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I have a simple code which doesn't work correctly with reference (polymorphism).

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class Base {
public:
    Base() {}
    virtual ~Base() {}
    virtual std::string text() const {
        return "Base";
    }
};

class Derived: public Base {
public:
    Derived(Base& _b): b(_b) {}
    virtual ~Derived() {}
    virtual std::string text() const {
        return b.text() + " - Derived";
    }

private:
    Base& b;
};

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    Base b;
    Derived d1(b);
    std::cout << d1.text() << std::endl;

    Derived d2(d1);
    std::cout << d2.text() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

And output:

Base - Derived
Base - Derived

The second line in output I expected: Base - Derived - Derived. I read some resources and polymorphism work perfectly with reference and pointer but in this situation, it doesn't. If I replace reference by pointer, it work again. So, anybody can give me some explainations?

Thanks so much!

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2  
It looks like you're invoking the default copy-ctor of Derived since you never provided one. The default is a better fit in the second example than the first (which explicitly is type Base). To prove this, set a breakpoint or output a debug msg in Derived(Base&). You should see it is NOT fired in the second example. In other words d1 is just a copy of d2. –  WhozCraig Aug 24 '13 at 5:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're invoking the default copy constructor to Derived. Therefore when finished d2 will be a simple member-copy of d1, and both their b members will reference the same Base instance.

To prove this, add this to your Derived class

class Derived: public Base {
public:
    Derived(Derived& d) : b(d) {}
    Derived(Base& _b): b(_b) {}
    virtual ~Derived() {}
    virtual std::string text() const {
        return b.text() + " - Derived";
    }

private:
    Base& b;
};

With this your output will become:

Base - Derived
Base - Derived - Derived

And just note, this is not a grand idea or a stellar learning example of polymorphism. (But it is an interesting example of construction overriding). Also note this is NOT a typical override of default copy-construction (where the parameter is a const-ref-type). Thus part of the reason this is not the greatest sample.

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If you instrument the code you will see that when you call Derived d2(d1) the Derived::Derived(Base&) constructor is not being called. This is because the d1 argument is a better match for the implicit copy constructor, which just copies the b member from d1 to d2.

In order to see the behavior you expect, you can explicitly cast the d1 to (Base&)d1. If you do so you will get code like the following (with the instrumentation):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class Base {
public:
    Base() {}
    virtual ~Base() {}
    virtual std::string text() const {
        return "Base";
    }
};

class Derived: public Base {
public:
    Derived(Base& _b): b(_b) {std::cout << "init'ed with: " << _b.text() << std::endl;}
    virtual ~Derived() {}
    virtual std::string text() const {
        return b.text() + " - Derived";
    }

private:
    Base& b;
};

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{

    std::cout << "Creating Base" << std::endl;
    Base b;

    std::cout << "Creating d1" << std::endl;
    Derived d1(b);
    std::cout << d1.text() << std::endl;

    std::cout << "Creating d2" << std::endl;
    Derived d2(d1);
    std::cout << d2.text() << std::endl;

    std::cout << "Creating d3" << std::endl;
    Derived d3((Base&)d1);
    std::cout << d3.text() << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

And this gives the expected output:

Creating Base
Creating d1
init'ed with: Base
Base - Derived
Creating d2
Base - Derived
Creating d3
init'ed with: Base - Derived
Base - Derived - Derived
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Ugh. Another reason not to have a D(B&) constructor! –  sfjac Aug 24 '13 at 6:00

Your d1 and d2 both have type Derived so this is working correctly. Typically the references are reversed; e.g.

Base b;
Derived d;
Base &dr = d;

std::cout << b.text() << std::endl;
std::cout << dr.text() << std::endl;

Here text() is invoked through a Base type but the latter will call the version in Derived.

Note that it doesn't typically make sense to allow a derived class to be initialized via a base class. Suppose you add type Derived2 that has abilities or state much different from Derived. This constructor would allow

Derived2 d2;
Derived d1(d2);

which is likely a very bad idea.

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1  
I believe he knows this, and he was wondering why the current way is not working he presented. –  lpapp Aug 24 '13 at 5:45

As noted correctly in the comment, it is now using the default copy constructor, and that is the reason for your observation with the same output for both. So, d1 is just copied into d2 rather than used for the base member variable inside d2.

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