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I'm starting to work with node.js and express for some restful API. I'm breaking my logic up into controllers. Each controller has some methods in to that correspond to what my API is doing. I don't want to have to update my routes every time I add a new functionality to and existing controller or a whole new feature with a new controller. To that end I'm trying to have my restful api defined by a simple set of routes and smart enough to figure things out based on the existing controllers and methods. To that end I have this...

"use strict";

module.exports = function (app) {
    var routes = [
        {
            'get'        : true,
            'put'        : false,
            'post'       : false,
            'update'     : false,
            'delete'     : false,
            'controller' : '',
            'action'     : 'search',
            'url'        : '/:controller/search/:query/:page?'
        },
        {
            'get'        : true,
            'put'        : false,
            'post'       : false,
            'update'     : false,
            'delete'     : false,
            'controller' : '',
            'action'     : '',
            'url'        : '/:controller/'
        },
        {
            'get'        : true,
            'put'        : false,
            'post'       : true,
            'update'     : true,
            'delete'     : true,
            'controller' : '',
            'action'     : '',
            'url'        : '/:controller/:id'
        },
        {
            'get'        : true,
            'put'        : false,
            'post'       : true,
            'update'     : false,
            'delete'     : false,
            'controller' : '',
            'action'     : '',
            'url'        : '/:controller/:id/:action'
        }
    ];

    function setupRoute(method, item) {
        if (method in item && item[method]) {
            console.log('Init route: ' + method.toUpperCase() + ' ' + item.url);
            app[method](item.url, function(req, res) {
                var c = '';
                if ('controller' in item) {
                    c = item.controller;
                }
                var a = '';
                if ('action' in item) {
                    c = item.action;
                }

                if ('controller' in req.params) {
                    c = req.params.controller;
                }
                if ('action' in req.params) {
                    a = req.params.action;
                }
                if (c == '') {
                    c = 'default';
                }
                if (a != '') {
                    a += '_';
                }
                a += req.method.toLowerCase();

                c = c.toLowerCase();
                a = a.toLowerCase();

                if (c in app.controllers) {
                    if (a in app.controllers[c]) {
                        app.controllers[c][a](req, res);
                    } else {
                        console.log('Unknown action on controller ' + a);
                        res.status(400).send('Bad Request');
                    }
                } else {
                    console.log('Unknown Controller  ' + c);
                    res.status(404).send('Not found');
                }
            });
        } else {
            app[method](item.url, function(req, res) {
                res.status(405).send('Method Not Allowed');
            }
        }
    }

    routes.forEach(function(item) {     
        setupRoute('get', item);
        setupRoute('put', item);
        setupRoute('post', item);
        setupRoute('update', item);
        setupRoute('delete', item);
    });
}

Are there any problems with setting things up this way?

Is there a better way to go about doing this?

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2 Answers 2

It looks like to me that you prefer to have a configuration file with all the routes rather than going down the usual way to build apps in express. If that is the case, I would recommend switching to Hapi. Hapi is a configuration centric framework that let you easily build APIs from configuration objects. Which sounds exactly what you're trying to do.

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Or locomotive (locomotivejs.org) which is similar to Rails (Express is more like Sinatra). –  tandrewnichols Aug 24 '13 at 14:01

I've experimented with a number of different methods for breaking up routes in node.js. If you're doing a small app, putting them right in app.js makes sense, but if you start to have a LOT of different routes that are handled by a lot of different controllers, it can get messy quickly. If what you're trying to do works (and I'd recommend extensive testing), then I think it's fine to do it that way, but keep in mind that complicated "magic" that just works can be slow, difficult to maintain, and difficult to debug. I was trying, for a while, to do a similar thing, but ultimately opted to simplify by adding a "register_routes" method to every controller. So something like this:

module.exports = {
    register_routes: function(app, callback) {
        app.get('/something', function(req, res){
            // Do stuff
        });
        callback();
    }
}

And then in routes/index.js

module.exports = [
    require('./something'),
    require('./something_else') // etc...
];

And then in app.js

var controllers = require('routes');
async.eachSeries(controllers, function(controller, cb){
    controller.register_routes(app, cb);
}, function(err){
    // done
});

Note that using a callback inside register_routes is recommended so that routes are registered in the correct order.

There are probably ways to structure routes in express that are BAD, but in general, if it works, it should be fine (especially if it's YOUR project).

However, like danielepolencic suggested, you might like at other frameworks that handle routing more naturally.

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