Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Boost.Signals is no longer being actively maintained, so it has been deprecated. Do not use Boost.Signals for new development (use Boost.Signals2 instead). If you have existing Boost.Signals-based code, it will continue to work, but consider moving to Boost.Signals2.

http://www.boost.org/users/history/version_1_54_0.html

So, Signals are deprecated. I'm confused about this. As far as I know, Signals2 is multi-threaded version of Signals. But what if I don't need multi-threading usage of Signals? Will I get some overhead? Can I use boost::signals2::trackable? Will I get any disadvantages using Signals2 in single-thread application?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I know, Signals2 is multi-threaded version of Signals. But what if I don't need multi-threading usage of Signals? Will I get some overhead?

In a single-threaded environment use dummy_mutex, as described here.

Can I use boost::signals2::trackable?

Yes, you can use it, but keep in mind that it won't be thread-safe approach. So if you eventually decide to adjust your module to a mutli-threaded environment, you'll have to re-design your slots.

share|improve this answer

Using multithread safe code in a single threaded app is always ok. You might gain some overhead due to being either overly careful or through useless locking, but it will always work. And I wouldn't worry about the performance hit- its very unlikely to be a bottleneck.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.