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I'm looking to remove all punctuation from a string and make all uppercase letters lower case in C, any suggestions?

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1  
Do you need to do it in-place or can you work in a new buffer? –  Jason Dec 3 '09 at 18:08
    
Jason, eliben's answer would work fine when the source==destination ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 3 '09 at 18:09
2  
Are you doing this in English? Some languages have problems with lowercasing characters. –  David Thornley Dec 3 '09 at 18:14
    
sounds a lot like homework... –  Dima Dec 3 '09 at 22:43
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Just a sketch of an algorithm using functions provided by ctype.h:

#include <ctype.h>

void remove_punct_and_make_lower_case(char *p)
{
    char *src = p, *dst = p;

    while (*src)
    {
       if (ispunct((unsigned char)*src))
       {
          /* Skip this character */
          src++;
       }
       else if (isupper((unsigned char)*src))
       {
          /* Make it lowercase */
          *dst++ = tolower((unsigned char)*src);
          src++;
       }
       else if (src == dst)
       {
          /* Increment both pointers without copying */
          src++;
          dst++;
       }
       else
       {
          /* Copy character */
          *dst++ = *src++;
       }
    }

    *dst = 0;
}

Standard caveats apply: Completely untested; refinements and optimizations left as exercise to the reader.

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1  
Don't forget to add that '\0' in the end !! –  Eli Bendersky Dec 3 '09 at 18:12
    
Nice catch. Fixed. –  asveikau Dec 3 '09 at 18:13
1  
You should cast the argument of the is* or to* functions to unsigned char. That is not a refinement or optimization! –  pmg Dec 3 '09 at 18:14
    
@pmg Or I could say this is restricted to ASCII strings. Like I say, it's a sketch of an algorithm. :-) At any rate, I was going to update it but it looks like Sinan beat me to it. Thanks guys. –  asveikau Dec 3 '09 at 18:18
1  
Since tolower() is usually implemented as a macro, you want to take the post-increment operator out of there, otherwise you'll have some nasty side-effects. –  Ferruccio Dec 3 '09 at 20:32
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Loop over the characters of the string. Whenever you meet a punctuation (ispunct), don't copy it to the output string. Whenever you meet an "alpha char" (isalpha), use tolower to convert it to lowercase.

All the mentioned functions are defined in <ctype.h>

You can either do it in-place (by keeping separate write pointers and read pointers to the string), or create a new string from it. But this entirely depends on your application.

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more detail here: stackoverflow.com/questions/421616/… –  TStamper Dec 3 '09 at 18:08
    
TStamper, there seems to be no C example there! C#, C++, but no C –  Eli Bendersky Dec 3 '09 at 18:10
    
@eliben- I was meaning in detail as for examples, not language specific –  TStamper Dec 3 '09 at 18:12
    
By the time I wrote full compilable program and tested it, there was already another answer doing basically the same thing. So, I deleted mine and upvoted @asveikau's answer. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 3 '09 at 18:19
    
SO... you snooze - you lose, survival of the fit^H^Hastest. :-) –  Eli Bendersky Dec 3 '09 at 18:20
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The idiomatic way to do this in C is to have two pointers, a source and a destination, and to process each character individually: e.g.

#include <ctype.h>

void reformat_string(char *src, char *dst) {
    for (; *src; ++src)
        if (!ispunct((unsigned char) *src))
            *dst++ = tolower((unsigned char) *src);
    *dst = 0;
}

src and dst can be the same string since the destination will never be larger than the source.

Although it's tempting, avoid calling tolower(*src++) since tolower may be implemented as a macro.

Avoid solutions that search for characters to replace (using strchr or similar), they will turn a linear algorithm into a geometric one.

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Arguments to ctype.h functions must be cast to unsigned char. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 3 '09 at 18:20
    
The argument to the is* and to* function should be cast to unsigned char. –  pmg Dec 3 '09 at 18:22
    
thanks, it's been a long time since I've written production C code –  Ferruccio Dec 3 '09 at 18:24
    
Searching for characters to replace will not make the algorithm exponential. Perhaps you are thinking it will change O(n) to O(n^2). This would be a geometric algorithm, not exponential (O(2^n)). But unless the characters to be replaced depends on the input in some way, the searching version will only multiply the algorithm's time by some constant (the number of such characters), which is still O(n) (though, obviously, a much less efficient O(n)). –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 3 '09 at 18:56
    
@Jeffrey - you're right. I was thinking of O(n^2) as exponential. –  Ferruccio Dec 3 '09 at 19:59
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Here's a rough cut of an answer for you:

void strip_punct(char * str) {
    int i = 0;
    int p = 0;
    int len = strlen(str);
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    	if (! ispunct(str[i]) {
    		str[p] = tolower(str[i]);
    		p++;
    	}
    }
}
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See Shlemiel the painter's algorithm: joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html –  Sinan Ünür Dec 3 '09 at 18:20
    
The argument to the is* and to* function should be cast to unsigned char. –  pmg Dec 3 '09 at 18:22
    
Shlemiel does not apply here: the strlen() function is used once outside the loop. –  pmg Dec 3 '09 at 18:26
    
@pmg It is not strictly Shlemiel but the function does traverse the string twice: Once to find the length and then to transform. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 3 '09 at 18:51
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