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Consider this code:

namespace FastReflectionTests
{
    public class Test
    {
        public void Method1()
        {
            var x = 10;
            var y = 20;
             if (x == 10 && y == 20)
            {

            }
        }

        public void Method2()
        {
            var x = 10;
            var y = 20;
            if (x == 10 && y == 20)
            {

            }
        }
    }
}

Now consider the IL Code:

This is method1:

    instance void Method1 () cil managed 
    {
    // Method begins at RVA 0x3bd0
    // Code size 17 (0x11)
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
    [0] int32 x,
    [1] int32 y
    )

    IL_0000: ldc.i4.s 10
    IL_0002: stloc.0
    IL_0003: ldc.i4.s 20
    IL_0005: stloc.1
    IL_0006: ldloc.0
    IL_0007: ldc.i4.s 10
    IL_0009: bne.un.s IL_0010

    IL_000b: ldloc.1
    IL_000c: ldc.i4.s 20
    IL_000e: pop
    IL_000f: pop

    IL_0010: ret
    } // end of method Test::Method1

This is method2:

    instance void Method2 () cil managed 
    {
    // Method begins at RVA 0x3bf0
    // Code size 17 (0x11)
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
    [0] int32 x,
    [1] int32 y
    )

    IL_0000: ldc.i4.s 10
    IL_0002: stloc.0
    IL_0003: ldc.i4.s 20
    IL_0005: stloc.1
    IL_0006: ldloc.0
    IL_0007: ldc.i4.s 10
    IL_0009: bne.un.s IL_0010

    IL_000b: ldloc.1
    IL_000c: ldc.i4.s 20
    IL_000e: pop
    IL_000f: pop

    IL_0010: ret
    } // end of method Test::Method2

method1 get 00:00:00.0000019 second for invoke.

method2 get 00:00:00.0000006 second for invoke.

I write this code for test

public class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var test = new Test();
            test.Method1();
            test.Method2();
            System.Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }


    public class Test
    {
        public void Method1()
        {
            var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopwatch.Start();
            var x = 10;
            var y = 20;
            if (x == 10)
            {
                if (y == 20)
                {

                }
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("Time Method1: {0}",
                stopwatch.Elapsed);
        }

        public void Method2()
        {
            var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopwatch.Start();
            var x = 10;
            var y = 20;
            if (x == 10 && y == 20)
            {

            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Time Method2: {0}",
                stopwatch.Elapsed);
        }
    }

I change the place of method1 and method2.

 test.Method2();
 test.Method1();

and re-run the test.

method1 get 00:00:00.0000006 second for invoke.

method2 get 00:00:00.0000019 second for invoke.

When I change the place of methods, the second method spends more time than the first method! What is the reason?

share|improve this question
1  
Wait, do you mean that the first method you call is slower? Because it seems like your second example output is the first one copy-pasted, not the result of you running your code after changing the order of calls. (It still lists method1 before method2.) In that case, duh, on the second call its code is probably in the CPU cache or was JITted already. –  millimoose Aug 24 '13 at 10:50
1  
Agree that the 2 methods have the same calculations, so the first call is always slower than the second because the calculations may be cached in CPU cache after the first call. –  King King Aug 24 '13 at 11:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You're timing a trivial amount of code, in such a way that any number of tiny incidental things will be disturbing the results - a page fault or cache miss could become relevant at that point... and that could easily be affected by the ordering of methods.

You should really benchmark multiple calls - or any way of doing enough work to take a reasonable amount of time. Any benchmark which measures time less than a second or so is dubious, IMO.

Additionally:

  • You almost certainly don't want to include JIT compilation time.
  • JIT compilation should be able to remove code which is basically pointless, most of the time. I typically add some sort of accumulator and output the result at the end of the test (after stopping the Stopwatch) to keep the JIT compiler "honest".

See Eric Lippert's benchmarking series for more details (and other pitfalls like GC):

share|improve this answer
    
I write a loop 0 to 100000 in the function and again get same result the first method get more time –  Test Aug 24 '13 at 10:47
1  
@ShahroozJefriㇱ A loop from 0 to 100000 that does nothing could be removed during optimisation. –  millimoose Aug 24 '13 at 10:49
    
@ShahroozJefriㇱ: Does that happen if you call the methods twice? Bear in mind there's JIT compilation time as well... and optimization of a loop which does nothing useful, as millimoose has said. I suggest you edit your question with what you believe to be a valid test. You might want to read Eric Lippert's series on benchmarking, starting here: tech.pro/blog/1293/c-performance-benchmark-mistakes-part-one –  Jon Skeet Aug 24 '13 at 10:49
    
@JonSkeet Poking at this in IDEone I think the OP is just phrasing things badly and means that the first method that gets called is slower. –  millimoose Aug 24 '13 at 10:52
3  
@millimoose: which is quite possibly to do with JIT compilation. That's the problem - there are enough perils in benchmarking that it's tricky to write a good one, and we need to see the complete code of what the OP considers "done" before it's really worth picking it apart too much. –  Jon Skeet Aug 24 '13 at 10:55

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