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I have this code (I'm a Haskell newbie).

import Data.List.Split

padL :: Int -> String -> String
padL n s
    | length s < n = replicate (n - length s) '0' ++ s
    | otherwise = s

strInc :: String -> String -> String
strInc sep str = 
        let strarr = splitOn sep str
            zprefix = strarr !! 0
            znumber = strarr !! 1
        in zprefix ++ sep ++ padL ( length (znumber) ) ( show ( read ( znumber ) + 1 ) )

Is it bad, average or good Haskell code? How can it be improved? Thanks.

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2  
I think Stackoverflow is not the right place to ask this. The site is about questions, not code reviews. For code reviews, there is codereview.stackexchange.com. –  bennofs Aug 24 '13 at 12:57
1  
I'm asking about idiomatic Haskell I may not be aware of. There is already an accepted and answered "How should I refactor this Haskell..." question, similar to mine. I could reformulate without my code if it helps, the title is self explanatory about what my question is. –  itmitică Aug 24 '13 at 13:08
    
If at all possible, maintain the numeric part of the identifier separately and only add the string part later. Having an numeric increment function of type String -> String seems unpleasant. If you could wrap your number in a newtype with a custom read and show to achieve your end result, that would be nicer. (Not sure what you're using this for, which is why I'm uncertain.) –  AndrewC Aug 26 '13 at 18:21
    
This is a learning exercise. It's part of a "how do you do this in that language". I proposed the above code in Haskell, but I wanted to conduct a scrutiny for my own personal Haskell development. –  itmitică Aug 27 '13 at 19:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
import Data.List.Split

Not being afraid of using non-base packages: This is good.

-- Original code
padL :: Int -> String -> String
padL n s
    | length s < n = replicate (n - length s) '0' ++ s
    | otherwise = s

Unneeded cases: this is not "bad" but "silly". Consider instead:

-- New code
padL n s = replicate (n - length s) '0' ++ s

If length s >= n then replicate (0 or negative) '0' == "" and this answer is the same as your otherwise case.

-- Original code
strInc :: String -> String -> String
strInc sep str = 
        let strarr = splitOn sep str
            zprefix = strarr !! 0
            znumber = strarr !! 1
        in zprefix ++ sep ++ padL ( length (znumber) ) ( show ( read ( znumber ) + 1 ) )

Using indexing into lists (!!): this is bad because it is ugly and can fail (what if the list is shorter than you expected?).

Over-use of parens: This is annoying

How about:

-- New code
strInc :: String -> String -> String
strInc sep str =
    case splitOn sep str of
      (zprefix:znumber:_) -> zprefix ++ sep ++ padL (length znumber) (show (read znumber + 1))
      _ -> "" -- some error value

Over all very good work. Nicely done.

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So replicate works with negative values. Nice one. I'm really taken with your strInc function! One thing I have to ask, why the _ as the tail in the first test case for the case? And thank you! –  itmitică Aug 24 '13 at 16:33
    
Ahh, so the _ is just notation for an unamed variable in a pattern match, zprefix:znumber:restOfList == zprefix:znumber:_ Notice this is slightly different than [zprefix,znumber], which will only match on a list of two elements (instead of two OR MORE elements). –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Aug 24 '13 at 18:46
    
I see, if I use more than one separator, it will only manage the second element, and loose the tail. By the way, how do I handle the case where znumber doesn't convert to a number, i.e. znumber = 00001a? Thanks. –  itmitică Aug 24 '13 at 19:31
    
You can use readMaybe and pattern match or use the maybe function. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Aug 24 '13 at 19:46

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