Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We all know that global variables are anything but best practice. But there are several instances when it is difficult to code without them. What techniques do you use to avoid the use of global variables?

For example, given the following scenario, how would you not use a global variable?

JavaScript code:

var uploadCount = 0;

window.onload = function() {
    var frm = document.forms[0];

    frm.target = "postMe";
    frm.onsubmit = function() {
        startUpload();
        return false;
    }
}

function startUpload() {
    var fil = document.getElementById("FileUpload" + uploadCount);

    if (!fil || fil.value.length == 0) {
        alert("Finished!");
        document.forms[0].reset();
        return;
    }

    disableAllFileInputs();
    fil.disabled = false;
    alert("Uploading file " + uploadCount);
    document.forms[0].submit();
}

Relevant markup:

<iframe src="test.htm" name="postHere" id="postHere"
  onload="uploadCount++; if(uploadCount > 1) startUpload();"></iframe>

<!-- MUST use inline JavaScript here for onload event
     to fire after each form submission. -->

This code comes from a web form with multiple <input type="file">. It uploads the files one at a time to prevent huge requests. It does this by POSTing to the iframe, waiting for the response which fires the iframe onload, and then triggers the next submission.

You don't have to answer this example specifically, I am just providing it for reference to a situation in which I am unable to think of a way to avoid global variables.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 34 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to wrap your code in a closure and manually expose only those variables you need globally to the global scope:

(function() {
    // Your code here

    // Expose to global
    window['varName'] = varName;
})();

To address Crescent Fresh's comment: in order to remove global variables from the scenario entirely, the developer would need to change a number of things assumed in the question. It would look a lot more like this:

Javascript:

(function() {
    var addEvent = function(element, type, method) {
        if('addEventListener' in element) {
            element.addEventListener(type, method, false);
        } else if('attachEvent' in element) {
            element.attachEvent('on' + type, method);

        // If addEventListener and attachEvent are both unavailable,
        // use inline events. This should never happen.
        } else if('on' + type in element) {
            // If a previous inline event exists, preserve it. This isn't
            // tested, it may eat your baby
            var oldMethod = element['on' + type],
                newMethod = function(e) {
                    oldMethod(e);
                    newMethod(e);
                };
        } else {
            element['on' + type] = method;
        }
    },
        uploadCount = 0,
        startUpload = function() {
            var fil = document.getElementById("FileUpload" + uploadCount);

            if(!fil || fil.value.length == 0) {    
                alert("Finished!");
                document.forms[0].reset();
                return;
            }

            disableAllFileInputs();
            fil.disabled = false;
            alert("Uploading file " + uploadCount);
            document.forms[0].submit();
        };

    addEvent(window, 'load', function() {
        var frm = document.forms[0];

        frm.target = "postMe";
        addEvent(frm, 'submit', function() {
            startUpload();
            return false;
        });
    });

    var iframe = document.getElementById('postHere');
    addEvent(iframe, 'load', function() {
        uploadCount++;
        if(uploadCount > 1) {
            startUpload();
        }
    });

})();

HTML:

<iframe src="test.htm" name="postHere" id="postHere"></iframe>

You don't need an inline event handler on the <iframe>, it will still fire on each load with this code.

Regarding the load event

Here is a test case demonstrating that you don't need an inline onload event. This depends on referencing a file (/emptypage.php) on the same server, otherwise you should be able to just paste this into a page and run it.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
    <title>untitled</title>
</head>
<body>
    <script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
        (function() {
            var addEvent = function(element, type, method) {
                if('addEventListener' in element) {
                    element.addEventListener(type, method, false);
                } else if('attachEvent' in element) {
                    element.attachEvent('on' + type, method);

                    // If addEventListener and attachEvent are both unavailable,
                    // use inline events. This should never happen.
                } else if('on' + type in element) {
                    // If a previous inline event exists, preserve it. This isn't
                    // tested, it may eat your baby
                    var oldMethod = element['on' + type],
                    newMethod = function(e) {
                        oldMethod(e);
                        newMethod(e);
                    };
                } else {
                    element['on' + type] = method;
                }
            };

            // Work around IE 6/7 bug where form submission targets
            // a new window instead of the iframe. SO suggestion here:
            // http://stackoverflow.com/q/875650
            var iframe;
            try {
                iframe = document.createElement('<iframe name="postHere">');
            } catch (e) {
                iframe = document.createElement('iframe');
                iframe.name = 'postHere';
            }

            iframe.name = 'postHere';
            iframe.id = 'postHere';
            iframe.src = '/emptypage.php';
            addEvent(iframe, 'load', function() {
                alert('iframe load');
            });

            document.body.appendChild(iframe);

            var form = document.createElement('form');
            form.target = 'postHere';
            form.action = '/emptypage.php';
            var submit = document.createElement('input');
            submit.type = 'submit';
            submit.value = 'Submit';

            form.appendChild(submit);

            document.body.appendChild(form);
        })();
    </script>
</body>
</html>

The alert fires every time I click the submit button in Safari, Firefox, IE 6, 7 and 8.

share|improve this answer
    
Or provide some sort of accessor. I agree. –  Upperstage Dec 3 '09 at 18:35
2  
It's helpful when people vote stuff down for them to explain their reasoning for voting down. –  eyelidlessness Dec 3 '09 at 19:28
3  
I did not down-vote. However, saying window['varName'] = varName is the same as making a global var declaration outside of the closure. var foo = "bar"; (function() { alert(window['foo']) })(); –  Josh Stodola Dec 3 '09 at 19:50
    
You answered the title, not the question. I didn't like that. Putting the closure idiom within the context of references from the inline event handler (as the meat of the question is getting at) would have been nicer. –  Crescent Fresh Dec 3 '09 at 19:55
    
Josh Stodola, correct. That is because your inline event handler is calling a global function. With the closure, it is up to you to declare which variables (or functions) are global and which are not. It gives you full control over what (if anything) to make global. –  eyelidlessness Dec 3 '09 at 20:25

I suggest the module pattern.

YAHOO.myProject.myModule = function () {

    //"private" variables:
    var myPrivateVar = "I can be accessed only from within YAHOO.myProject.myModule.";

    //"private" method:
    var myPrivateMethod = function () {
    	YAHOO.log("I can be accessed only from within YAHOO.myProject.myModule");
    }

    return  {
    	myPublicProperty: "I'm accessible as YAHOO.myProject.myModule.myPublicProperty."
    	myPublicMethod: function () {
    		YAHOO.log("I'm accessible as YAHOO.myProject.myModule.myPublicMethod.");

    		//Within myProject, I can access "private" vars and methods:
    		YAHOO.log(myPrivateVar);
    		YAHOO.log(myPrivateMethod());

    		//The native scope of myPublicMethod is myProject; we can
    		//access public members using "this":
    		YAHOO.log(this.myPublicProperty);
    	}
    };

}(); // the parens here cause the anonymous function to execute and return
share|improve this answer
1  
I will +1 because I understand this and it is extremely helpful, but I am still unclear as to how effective this would be in the situation where I only use one global variable. Correct me if I am wrong, but executing this function and returning it causes the object returned to be stored in YAHOO.myProject.myModule, which is a global variable. Right? –  Josh Stodola Dec 3 '09 at 19:47
6  
@Josh: global variable is not evil. Global variable_S_ are evil. Keep the count of globals as few as possible. –  erenon Dec 3 '09 at 20:36
    
The whole anonymous function would be executed every time you wanted to access one of the 'modules' public properties/methods right? –  UpTheCreek Sep 5 '11 at 14:27
    
@UpTheCreek: no, it won't. It's executed only once, when the program encounters the closing () on the last line, and the returned object will be assigned to the myModule property with the closure containing the myPrivateVar and myPrivateMethod. –  erenon Sep 5 '11 at 15:37
    
@erenon: interesting - thanks for the clarification. –  UpTheCreek Sep 5 '11 at 17:16

First off, it is impossible to avoid global JavaScript, something will always be dangling the global scope. Even if you create a namespace, which is still a good idea, that namespace will be global.

There are many approaches, however, to not abuse the global scope. Two of the simplest are to either use closure, or since you only have one variable you need to keep track of, just set it as a property of the function itself (which can then be treated as a static variable).

Closure

var startUpload = (function() {
  var uploadCount = 1;  // <----
  return function() {
    var fil = document.getElementById("FileUpload" + uploadCount++);  // <----

    if(!fil || fil.value.length == 0) {    
      alert("Finished!");
      document.forms[0].reset();
      uploadCount = 1; // <----
      return;
    }

    disableAllFileInputs();
    fil.disabled = false;
    alert("Uploading file " + uploadCount);
    document.forms[0].submit();
  };
})();

* Note that incrementing of uploadCount is happening internally here

Function Property

var startUpload = function() {
  startUpload.uploadCount = startUpload.count || 1; // <----
  var fil = document.getElementById("FileUpload" + startUpload.count++);

  if(!fil || fil.value.length == 0) {    
    alert("Finished!");
    document.forms[0].reset();
    startUpload.count = 1; // <----
    return;
  }

  disableAllFileInputs();
  fil.disabled = false;
  alert("Uploading file " + startUpload.count);
  document.forms[0].submit();
};

I'm not sure why uploadCount++; if(uploadCount > 1) ... is necessary, as it looks like the condition will always be true. But if you do need global access to the variable, then the function property method I described above will allow you to do so without the variable actually being global.

<iframe src="test.htm" name="postHere" id="postHere"
  onload="startUpload.count++; if (startUpload.count > 1) startUpload();"></iframe>

However, if that's the case, then you should probably use an object literal or instantiated object and go about this in the normal OO way (where you can use the module pattern if it strikes your fancy).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for my favorite answer, clear, simple, concise. –  eighteyes Sep 4 '12 at 16:45
    
@eighteyes Thanks! –  Justin Johnson Sep 4 '12 at 22:20
1  
You absolutely can avoid global scope. In your 'Closure' example, simply remove 'var startUpload = ' from the beginning, and that function will be completely enclosed, with no accessibility at the global level. In practice, many people prefer to expose a single variable, within which are contained references to everything else –  derrylwc Jun 26 '13 at 4:58
1  
@derrylwc In this case, startUpload is that single variable that you are referring to. Removing var startUpload = from the closure example means that the inner function will never be able to be executed because there is no reference to it. The issue of avoiding global scope pollution is in regards to the internal counter variable, uploadCount which is used by startUpload. Moreover, I think that the OP is trying to avoid polluting any scope outside of this method with the internally used uploadCount variable. –  Justin Johnson Jul 17 '13 at 22:53

Sometimes it makes sense to have global variables in JavaScript. But don't leave them hanging directly off window like that.

Instead, create a single "namespace" object to contain your globals. For bonus points, put everything in there, including your methods.

share|improve this answer
    
how can I do that? create a single namespace object to contain my globals? –  p.matsinopoulos Aug 17 '13 at 11:53
window.onload = function() {
  var frm = document.forms[0];
  frm.target = "postMe";
  frm.onsubmit = function() {
    frm.onsubmit = null;
    var uploader = new LazyFileUploader();
    uploader.startUpload();
    return false;
  }
}

function LazyFileUploader() {
    var uploadCount = 0;
    var total = 10;
    var prefix = "FileUpload";	
    var upload = function() {
    	var fil = document.getElementById(prefix + uploadCount);

    	if(!fil || fil.value.length == 0) {    
    		alert("Finished!");
    		document.forms[0].reset();
    		return;
    	 }

    	disableAllFileInputs();
    	fil.disabled = false;
    	alert("Uploading file " + uploadCount);
    	document.forms[0].submit();
    	uploadCount++;

    	if (uploadCount < total) {
    		setTimeout(function() {
    			upload();
    		}, 100); 
    	}
    }

    this.startUpload = function() {
    	setTimeout(function() {
    		upload();
    	}, 100);  
    } 		
}
share|improve this answer
    
How do I increment the uploadCount inside of my onload handler on the iframe? This is crucial. –  Josh Stodola Dec 3 '09 at 19:30
    
OK, I see what you did here. Unfortunately this is not the same. This fires all uploads seperately, but at the same time (technically, there is 100ms in between them). The current solution uploads them sequentially, meaning the second upload does not start until the first upload is completed. That's why the inline onload handler is required. Programmatically assigning the handler does not work, because it only fires the first time. The inline handler fires every time (for whatever reason). –  Josh Stodola Dec 3 '09 at 19:41
    
I am still going to +1 though, because I do see that this is an effective method of hiding a global variable –  Josh Stodola Dec 3 '09 at 19:43
    
You could create an iframe for each upload to maintain the individual callbacks. –  Justin Johnson Dec 3 '09 at 20:31
1  
I think this is ultimately a great answer, just slightly clouded by the particular example's requirements. Basically the idea is to create a template (object) and use 'new' to instantiate it. This is probably the best answer because it genuinely avoids a global variable ie without compromise –  PandaWood May 9 '11 at 1:24

Use closures. Something like this gives you a scope other than global.

(function() {
    // Your code here
    var var1;
    function f1() {
        if(var1){...}
    }

    window.var_name = something; //<- if you have to have global var
    window.glob_func = function(){...} //<- ...or global function
})();
share|improve this answer

Some things are going to be in the global namespace -- namely, whatever function you're calling from your inline JavaScript code.

In general, the solution is to wrap everything in a closure:

(function() {
    var uploadCount = 0;
    function startupload() {  ...  }
    document.getElementById('postHere').onload = function() {
        uploadCount ++;
        if (uploadCount > 1) startUpload();
    };
})();

and avoid the inline handler.

share|improve this answer
    
The inline handler is required in this situation. When form submits to iframe, your onload handler set programmatically will not fire. –  Josh Stodola Dec 3 '09 at 19:29
    
@Josh: whoa, really? iframe.onload = ... is not equivalent to <iframe onload="..."? –  Crescent Fresh Dec 3 '09 at 19:54

Using closures might be OK for small to medium projects. However, for big projects, you might want to split your code into modules and save them in different files.

Therefore I wrote jQuery Secret plugin to solve the problem.

In your case with this plugin the code would look something like the following.

JavaScript:

// Initialize uploadCount.
$.secret( 'in', 'uploadCount', 0 ).

// Store function disableAllFileInputs.
secret( 'in', 'disableAllFileInputs', function(){
  // Code for 'disable all file inputs' goes here.

// Store function startUpload
}).secret( 'in', 'startUpload', function(){
    // 'this' points to the private object in $.secret
    // where stores all the variables and functions
    // ex. uploadCount, disableAllFileInputs, startUpload.

    var fil = document.getElementById( 'FileUpload' + uploadCount);

    if(!fil || fil.value.length == 0) {
        alert( 'Finished!' );
        document.forms[0].reset();
        return;
    }

    // Use the stored disableAllFileInputs function
    // or you can use $.secret( 'call', 'disableAllFileInputs' );
    // it's the same thing.
    this.disableAllFileInputs();
    fil.disabled = false;

    // this.uploadCount is equal to $.secret( 'out', 'uploadCount' );
    alert( 'Uploading file ' + this.uploadCount );
    document.forms[0].submit();

// Store function iframeOnload
}).secret( 'in', 'iframeOnload', function(){
    this.uploadCount++;
    if( this.uploadCount > 1 ) this.startUpload();
});

window.onload = function() {
    var frm = document.forms[0];

    frm.target = "postMe";
    frm.onsubmit = function() {
        // Call out startUpload function onsubmit
        $.secret( 'call', 'startUpload' );
        return false;
    }
}

Relevant markup:

<iframe src="test.htm" name="postHere" id="postHere" onload="$.secret( 'call', 'iframeOnload' );"></iframe>

Open your Firebug, you will find no globals at all, not even the funciton :)

For full documentation, please see here.

For a demo page, please see this.

Source code on GitHub.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.