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public AreaModel(Int64 AreaId)
{
    CurrentAreaId = AreaId;
    CurrentSet = true;
    var c = Client;
}

private ManagementServiceClient Client
{
    get
    {
        if (_client == null || _client.State == (CommunicationState.Closed | CommunicationState.Faulted))
        {
            _client = new ManagementServiceClient();
            _client.Open();
        }

        var c = Areas;

        return _client;
    }
}

public Management_Area[] Areas
{
    get
    {
        return Client.GetAreaHeaders();
    }
}

This code is an exert of a custom Model which is passed into an MVC view.

We had a developer who wrote a lot of weird (to us) code at our company before leaving somewhat abruptly. A lot of his code is written in such a specific way that it's hard for us to know if he actually knew what he was doing, or just didn't at all.

The reason I'm asking this question is because I see what he was doing here, but I'm not sure if it works, or what the point of it really is.

The first question I have is: When AreaModel's constructor is called, does Client.GetAreaHeaders() get called? Because I see why it might, but I'm not entirely convinced that it actually does. I placed a breakpoint inside GetAreaHeaders on the service side, which should have triggered if it got called, so I'm leaning towards saying "No, it does not get called"... but I'm not sure my breakpoints were actually correctly done or 'hitting' (I just set this service up in IIS, I had no reason to debug it before), so I wanted to know from someone more familiar, "should it have been called?" and why, or why not. Because I can tell from this code that the guy who wrote it definitely expected that it was going to be called.

It looks to me like he was thinking about the idea of implementing some sort of cache of the result of the service call, but never really got around to saving it anywhere useful (Because when he tries to read it, isn't GetAreaHeaders() just going to get called a second time?). So my second question if anyone is familiar is, does it even make sense to cache something like this, if it were fully working? When the model gets re-created on every page load, why would it be better to have "Areas" pre-populated at Model creation, versus just accessing it once in the View/Controller and storing it in some variable that is within the scope of the page? To me it seems like they would take the same amount of time.

I hope this question is well explained and makes sense. Please let me know if there is any way I can edit the question to be more beneficial to everyone.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Client.GetAreaHeaders() will be called when AreaModel's constructor is called. It will be called because the Client property is accessed and Client's getter has this statement, var c = Areas; This statement access the Areas property which will call Client.GetAreaHeaders(). That being said the statement var c = Client; is unnecessary because it creates the local variable c that is never used. He may have done this in order to initialize the Client property, although it is an unconventional way to do so, it should just be initialized in the constructor itself.

  2. Caching can make sense anytime there is a reasonable amount of work that is performed and hence caching the result will improve the response time on the second access. That being said, as with every cache, it can become dirty which may or may not be something to consider. Whether or not this caching is helping depends on the exact controller/action logic and view logic that uses this model. I would say that in most scenarios you are right, this is probably unnecessary because it being a web application everything is created and destroyed on every request, unless you store the data somewhere more permanent such as the session or the database. Also, the statement var c = Areas; is even more useless than the similar call in the constructor because the Areas getter doesn't store anything and the local variable c is, once again, never used.

So to some up, the caching of the service call into the variable _client will only be useful if a) the initialization of the service is expensive and b) if the Client property on a single instance of AreaModel will be accessed multiple times within the same request.

Reviewing the code again it seems like it would cause an infinite loop because the Client property accesses the Areas property which then accesses the Client property again.

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