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Lets say I'm interacting with a system that has two incrementing counters which depend on each other (these counters will never decrement): int totalFoos; // barredFoos plus nonBarredFoos int barredFoos;

I also have two methods: int getTotalFoos(); // Basically a network call to localhost int getBarredFoos(); // Basically a network call to localhost

These two counters are kept and incremented by code that I don't have access to. Let's assume that it increments both counters on an alternate thread but in a thread-safe manner (i.e. at any given point in time the two counters will be in sync).

What is the best way to get an accurate count of both barredFoos and nonBarredFoos at a single point in time?

The completely naive implementation:

int totalFoos = getTotalFoos();
int barredFoos = getBarredFoos();
int nonBarredFoos = totalFoos - barredFoos;

This has the issue that the system could increment both counters in between the two method calls and then my two copies would be out of sync and barredFoos would have a value of more than it did when totalFoos was fetched.

Basic double-checked implementation:

while (true) {
    int totalFoos = getTotalFoos();
    int barredFoos = getBarredFoos();

    if (totalFoos == getTotalFoos()) {
        // totalFoos did not change during fetch of barredFoos, so barredFoos should be accurate.
        int nonBarredFoos = totalFoos - barredFoos;
        break;
    }

    // totalFoos changed during fetch of barredFoos, try again
}

This should work in theory, but I'm not sure that the JVM guarantees that this is what actually happens in practice once optimization and such is taken into account. For an example of these concerns, see http://www.cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html (Link via Romain Muller).

Given the methods I have and the assumption above that the counters are in fact updated together, is there a way I can guarantee that my copies of the two counts are in sync?

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1  
You shouldn't rely on double-check to work properly in Java: cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html –  Romain Dec 3 '09 at 18:59
    
@RomainMuller thanks for the link. That's exactly the sort of thing I was referring to in my concerns about the latter sample above. –  Lawrence Johnston Dec 3 '09 at 19:01
    
I completely bookmarked that article the first time I've seen it... There are a lot of very common errors in Java that almost everybody commits without knowing that evil is lurking in the dark... –  Romain Dec 3 '09 at 19:06
    
Indeed, double-checked locking doesn't work in Java; however, that isn't an issue here. This is code that (unless I'm mistaken) is only run in a single thread. –  Gabriel Reid Dec 3 '09 at 19:10
    
it is multithreaded in that the values of the variables are changed on another host across the network - so it does apply (i think!) –  Joel Dec 3 '09 at 19:12
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, I believe your implementation will be sufficient; the real work is making sure that the values that are returned by getTotalFoos and getBarredFoos are indeed synchronized and always returning the latest values. However, as you've said, this is already the case.

Of course, one thing you could run in to with this code is an endless loop; you would want to be sure that the two values being changed in such a short time would be a very exceptional situation, and even then I think that it would definitely be wise to build in a safety (ie maximum number of iterations) to avoid getting into an endless loop. If the value coming out of those counter is in code that you don't have access to, you don't want to be totally relying on the fact that things will never go awry at the other end.

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+1. In order to not have to play the retry-hokey-pokey, you would need to synchronize your method with the methods from the system you're interacting with, which is of course, impossible in your situation. –  Chris Dec 3 '09 at 19:05
1  
His implementation isn't sufficient as the VM is allowed to reorder the calls such that the call to getBarredFoos() could appear to come after both calls to getTotalFoos(). See Brian Goetz's "Java Concurrancy in Practice" for details. –  Steve Emmerson Dec 3 '09 at 19:07
    
Thanks for the input. In the actual implementation I am taking the possible infinite loop into account. –  Lawrence Johnston Dec 3 '09 at 19:09
    
@Steve Emmerson Thank you, that was exactly the kind of thing I was concerned about. Is there anyway to insure that they do happen in the proper sequence? –  Lawrence Johnston Dec 3 '09 at 19:09
1  
@Steve Emmerson: true that the JVM can re-order operations, but only if that re-ordering does not influence the function of a single thread (ie without taking other threads into account). If I'm not mistaken, re-ordering those operations would greatly affect the logic in this thread, so that reordering could not happen. –  Gabriel Reid Dec 3 '09 at 19:20
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To guarantee read consitency across threads - and prevent code execution re-ordering, especially on muli-core machines, you need to synchronize all read and write access to those variables. In addition, to ensure that on a single thread you see the most up to date values of all variables being used in the current computation you need to synchronise on read access.

Update: I missed the bit about the calls to get the values of both variables being separate calls over the network - which renders this the double-checked locking problem (so without an api method available to you that returns both values at once you cann't absolutely guarantee consistency of both variables at any point in time).

See Brian Goetz's article on Java memory model.

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Which variables? The fields are declared in a system he has no access to, and making local variables volatile is senseless, since only one thread will access them. –  meriton Dec 3 '09 at 18:54
    
I don't think that there is any issue with the values of those variables, as they're only being accessed within a single thread –  Gabriel Reid Dec 3 '09 at 18:55
    
@meriton I changed my answer while you posted your comment.. –  Joel Dec 3 '09 at 18:56
    
Exactly meriton. And I also have to have the result from both methods at what is essentially the same point in time (it doesn't matter precisely what point in time, just that it's the same for both variables). totalFoos can't change before I access barredFoos, otherwise the subtraction to find nonBarredFoos will be thrown off. –  Lawrence Johnston Dec 3 '09 at 18:59
    
hmm, yeah, should have read the question more carefully - missed the bit about network calls. mea culpa. –  Joel Dec 3 '09 at 19:02
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You can probably not reliably do what you want unless the system you are interacting with has a method that enables you to retrieve both values at once (in an atomic way).

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Is that so? Can you give an example when his code would fail? –  meriton Dec 3 '09 at 19:05
    
@meriton - if barredFoos had changed after checking that totalFoos had not changed –  Joel Dec 3 '09 at 19:11
    
@Joel: why would that matter? The code does not retrieve the current barredFoos after checking that totalFoos has not changed, but uses the values retrieved earlier, which must be consistent, since totalFoos did not change. –  meriton Dec 3 '09 at 19:26
    
@meriton - you are assuming that totalFoos only changes if barredFoos changes (and vica versa) whereas I had assumed that this was not necessarily the case. –  Joel Dec 3 '09 at 19:40
    
This definitely makes sense. Though the example may be overly simplistic and certainly doesn't scale to a larger number of counters, does it? –  Romain Dec 3 '09 at 19:41
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I was going to mention AtomicInteger as well, but that won't work, because

1) you've got TWO integers, not just one. AtomicIntegers won't help you. 2) He doesn't have access to the underlying code.

My question is, even if you can't modify the underlying code, can you control when it's executed? You could put synchronization blocks around any functions that modify those counters. That might not be pleasant, (it could be slower then your loop) but that would arguably be the 'correct' way to do it.

If you can't even control the internal threads, then I guess your loop would work.

And finally, if you ever do get control of the code, the best thing would be to have one synchronized function that blocks access to both integers as it runs, and returns the two of them in an int[].

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Unfortunately, this is a situation where the system maintaining the counters is not controlled by my company. –  Lawrence Johnston Dec 3 '09 at 19:06
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Given that there's no way to access whatever locking mechanism is maintaining the invariant "totalFoos = barredFoos + nonBarredFoos", there's no way to ensure that the values you retrieve are consistent with that invariant. Sorry.

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Thinking further, can you guarantee that both the get...() methods use the same synchronization mechanism during value retrieval that is used when updating either value? If so, then I think your hack will work because the get...()'s will enforce ordering. –  Steve Emmerson Dec 3 '09 at 19:53
    
Interesting point. I'll look into it. –  Lawrence Johnston Dec 3 '09 at 20:42
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The method that contains the code

while (true) {    
 int totalFoos = getTotalFoos();    
 int barredFoos = getBarredFoos();    
 if (totalFoos == getTotalFoos()) {        
  int nonBarredFoos = totalFoos - barredFoos;        
  break;    
 }

}

Should be synchronized

private synchronized void getFoos()
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Why? What does synchronizing single-threaded code accomplish? –  meriton Dec 3 '09 at 19:31
    
@Meriton. Thnaks for pointing the mistake out. Staring at the ACORD schema for the last week has made my eyes hazy –  ChadNC Dec 3 '09 at 19:56
    
Please explain the reason for the downvote so that I can understand my errors. Downvoting without an explanation is ridiculous and should be considered spam. –  ChadNC Dec 4 '09 at 14:22
    
It wasn't me, but: You don't state why you think synchronization is needed. I happen to think it isn't, because there is only one thread in this virtual machine. –  meriton Dec 4 '09 at 15:55
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