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I am new to Java and I understand the underlying basic concepts of inheritance. I have a question regarding referencing through superclass. As the methods of class inherited from a superclass or implemented using an interface can be referenced through a superclass reference (interface or class). How would it work when both extends and implements are involved with a class?

class A {
  void test() {
    System.out.println("One");
  }
}

interface J {
  void first();
}

// This class object can referenced using A like A a = new B()
class B extends A {
  // code    
}

// This class object can referenced using J like J j = new B()
class B implements J {
  // code
}

// my question is what happens in case of below which referencing for runtime polymorphism?
class B extends A implements J {
  // code 
}

Which fails to compile with:

Main.java:16: error: duplicate class: B
class B implements J {
^
Main.java:21: error: duplicate class: B
class B extends A implements J {
^
2 errors
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Can you give an example of what you mean? –  arshajii Aug 24 '13 at 16:04
    
It is unclear what you are asking. An example? –  Narendra Pathai Aug 24 '13 at 16:04
    
Please check the link . . ideone.com/7xRRdR –  user2713902 Aug 24 '13 at 16:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There can be some differences when referencing super class method vs interface methods, notably when you use super to call them. Consider these interfaces/classes:

public interface MyIFace {
    void ifaceMethod1();
}


public class MyParentClass {
    void parentClassMethod1();
}

public class MyClass extends MyParentClass implements MyIFace {

    public void someChildMethod() {
        ifaceMethods(); // call the interface method
        parentClassMethod1(); // call the parent method just like you would another method. If you override it in here, this will call the overridden method
        super.parentClassMethod1(); // you can use for a parent class method. this will call the parent's version even if you override it in here
    }

    @Override
    public void ifaceMethod1() {
      // implementation
    }

}

public class AnExternalClass {
    MyParentClass c = new MyClass();
    c.parentClassMethod1(); // if MyClass overrides parentClassMethod1, this will call the MyClass version of the method since it uses the runtime type, not the static compile time type
}

In general, calling the method without super will call the method implemented by runtime version of the class (regardless of whether the method is from a class or interface)

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How would it work if I say MyIFace mif = new Myclass() ? –  user2713902 Aug 24 '13 at 16:25
    
Will call the Myclass version. Only the runtime type is used for polymorphic calls. –  Jeff Storey Aug 24 '13 at 16:26

How would it work when both extends and implements are involved with a class ?

Assuming that is your question.

The extends keyword is for extending a superclass.

The implements is for implementing an interface


The difference between an interface and a superclass is that in an interface you cannot specify an specific implementation of the whole (only its "interface"- Interfaces cannot be instantiated, but rather are implemented).So this means you can only specify methods you want to incorperate, but not implement them on your project in the same sense.

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