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Using TypeScript 0.9.1.1, when trying to access a static variable from another module/file it is undefined.

Example code:

App.ts:

import Game = require('Game');

var game = new Game();

Game.ts:

import Grid = require('Grid');

class Game
{
    public Grid: Grid;
    public static Game: Game;

    constructor()
    {
        Game.Game = this;
        this.Grid = new Grid();
        this.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();
    }
}

export = Game;

Grid.ts:

import Game = require('Game');

class Grid
{
    public SeeIfStaticWorks()
    {
        var shouldNotBeUndefined = Game.Game;
    }
}

export = Grid;

Inspecting Game.Game before calling this.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks(); shows that it is defined:

But when trying to access it from inside SeeIfStaticWorks() it is undefined:

Question is: How to be able to access static variables from other modules?


Update:

Running all the code from one file allows using the static variable across modules (demo here):

class Grid
{
    public SeeIfStaticWorks()
    {
        console.log(Game.Game);
        if (Game.Game)
            alert('Instance is defined!');
        else
            alert('Instance is undefined!');
    }
}

class Game
{
    public Grid: Grid;

    private static game : Game;
    public static get Game() : Game
    {
        if (this.game == null)
        {
            this.game = new Game();
        }

        return this.game;
    }

    constructor()
    {
        this.Grid = new Grid();
    }
}

var game = Game.Game;

game.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();

If I use the same logic with AMD RequireJS the static variable is undefined when calling SeeIfStaticWorks():

App.ts:

import Game = require('Game');

var game = Game.Game;

game.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();

Game.ts:

import Grid = require('Grid');

class Game
{
    public Grid: Grid;

    private static game : Game;
    public static get Game() : Game
    {
        if (this.game == null)
        {
            this.game = new Game();
        }

        return this.game;
    }

    constructor()
    {
        this.Grid = new Grid();
    }
}

export = Game;

Grid.ts:

import Game = require('Game');

class Grid
{
    public SeeIfStaticWorks()
    {
        console.log(Game.Game);
        if (Game.Game)
            alert('Instance is defined!');
        else
            alert('Instance is undefined!');
    }
}

export = Grid;
share|improve this question

This is because that when the file Game.ts is parsed Game.Game is not set. You can see that in the generated javascript:

var Game = (function () {
    function Game() {
        Game.Game = this;
        this.Grid = new Grid();
        this.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();
    }
    return Game;
})();

To have static variables be available when you export something you must set them at the point of definition (not lazily as in your case). So :

class Game
{
    public Grid: Grid;
    public static Game: Game = new Game(); // set it outside the constructor

    constructor()
    {
        this.Grid = new Grid();
        this.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();
    }
}

You can see the generated javascript:

var Game = (function () {
    function Game() {
        this.Grid = new Grid();
        this.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();
    }
    Game.Game = new Game(); // Now this statement will execute when this javascript is parsed
    return Game;
})();

How to manage the singletons is a separate discussion. But I believe the above code is sufficient. (you can put in additional checks if you want a true singleton).

share|improve this answer
    
It won't work that way either because SeeIfStaticWorks() would be run before Game.Game is instantiated. I posted an update to the question with code closer to what I might use. Problem looks like it might be RequireJS related. Nice AngularJs / TS videos btw :) – Răzvan Panda Aug 25 '13 at 13:30
    
Since it doesn't work this way, could you please delete the answer? That would help getting a correct answer faster. – Răzvan Panda Aug 31 '13 at 16:28
    
see my other answer – basarat Aug 31 '13 at 23:22

In case it may help anyone, I've managed to create static variables using AMD within dojo framework by wrapping its 'declare' function (dojo's native function for creating 'classes').

(function () {
'use strict';

define([
    'dojo/dom',
    'dojo/_base/lang',
    'dojo/_base/declare'
], function (dom, lang, declare) {


    var constants = {
        SOME_CONSTANT: 'Here is it!'
    };

    var Car = declare(null, {
        constructor: function() {

        },

        throttle: function() {
            console.log('Vrrr!');
        }
    });

    lang.mixin(Car, constants);
    return Car;

});

}());

in client:

(function () {
'use strict';
define([
    'model/Car',
    'dojo/domReady!'
], function (Car) {
    var c = new Car();
    c.throttle();
    console.log(Car.SOME_CONSTANT);
});

}());

share|improve this answer

The following order independent code works. Demo Game before Grid:

class Game
{
    public Grid: Grid;
    public static Game;

    constructor()
    {
        Game.Game = this;
        this.Grid = new Grid();
        this.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();
    }
}
class Grid
{
    public SeeIfStaticWorks()
    {
        console.log(Game.Game);
        if (Game.Game)
            alert('Instance is defined!');
        else
            alert('Instance is undefined!');
    }
}
// Finally 
var daGame = new Game(); 

Or Grid before Game:

class Grid
{
    public SeeIfStaticWorks()
    {
        console.log(Game.Game);
        if (Game.Game)
            alert('Instance is defined!');
        else
            alert('Instance is undefined!');
    }
}
class Game
{
    public Grid: Grid;
    public static Game;

    constructor()
    {
        Game.Game = this;
        this.Grid = new Grid();
        this.Grid.SeeIfStaticWorks();
    }
}
// Finally 
var daGame = new Game(); 

Try it online.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, I don't want to sound rude but this is not using RequireJS and having the Game and Grid modules in different files. My current understanding is that the problem has to do with circular references in RequireJS but the solution there can't be applied since required is a keyword in TypeSCript. – Răzvan Panda Sep 1 '13 at 0:53

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