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I've got a Global Resource file with many values

Currently in code I call the value like this

TxtSuccess.Text =  (string) GetGlobalResourceObject("GlobalResource", "msgSuccess");

But if later in the design we needed to rename variables then maintaining will be a pain.

would it be better to do something like this?

public class AppGlobalConstants
{
    public string MsgSuccess{ get; private set; }

    public AppGlobalConstants()
    {
       MsgSuccess= (string) GetGlobalResourceObject("GlobalResource", "msgSuccess");
    }
}

Then if later on the team wanted to change the name of some of these global resources they could do so without having to modify any pages which used these resources.

We want to use globals as there are plans for our web application (asp.net web forms 4.5) to be available to additional countries and languages in the future.

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Any particular reason not to use VS and its built in support to auto generate resource classes from RESX for regular localization? –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 24 '13 at 18:17
    
if the names need changing. and we have already started referencing through the application - –  TheTiger Aug 24 '13 at 18:36
    
I see. I personally prefer compile time failures to complete manual testing on every resource string rename, but some people like manual testing... –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 24 '13 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

I would rather do something like this:

public static class AppGlobalConstants
{
    public static string MsgSuccess
    {
        get
        {
            return (string) GetGlobalResourceObject("GlobalResource", "msgSuccess");
        }
    }
}

This way, the values are static. In case the name changes, you simply modify the strings in this class. Because everything is static in this class, you could do something like this:

Console.WriteLine(AppGlobalConstants.MsgSuccess);

If you want, you could also add a set accessor to the properties. Because everything is static, there's no need to create instances of this class.

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Yes this is what i was thinking –  TheTiger Aug 24 '13 at 18:35
    
Seems the most effective to me. –  Swen Kooij Aug 24 '13 at 19:14

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