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I know working with an orm would be better and I am planning to use it in the future. But for now, Im working with a structure like this:

Class Arcticle with title and date Class DataArticle for the database actions So Im not performing my database actions in my Article class but in a separate Data class.

Now, in all my Data.. classes I used code to perform database actions like this:

public function getArticle($id){        
        $query = "SELECT title,date from articles where id = ?";          
        if ($stmt = $this->database->getConnection()->prepare($query)) {            
            $stmt->bind_param('i',$id);
            $stmt->execute();
            $stmt->bind_result($title,$date);   
            $stmt->store_result();
            $stmt->fetch();         
            if(($stmt->num_rows) == 1){
                $article = new Article();
                $article->title = $title;
                $article->date = $date;
                $stmt->close();             
                return $article;
            }else{
                $stmt->close();
                return null;
            }           
        }else{          
            throw new Exception($this->database->getConnection()->error);
        } 
    }

But working this way means that in every function in my data classes I would connect, perform a statement and throw errors. That is a lot of repeated code which could be centralized using a wrapper.

Now I am following the advice (Throw an exception in a function or how to do descent error handling) on creating a database wrapper/handler to perform all the database stuff so it is all centralized in one class which makes it easier to maintain.

So I created this class to start using PDO:

<?php
class DatabasePDO
{
    private $connection;

    private $host = "";
    private $username = "";
    private $password = "";
    private $dbname = "";

    public function openConnection(){
        $this->connection = new PDO("mysql:host=$this->host;dbname=$this->dbname",$this->username,$this->password);
        $this->connection->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);     
    }

    public function getConnection(){
        return $this->connection;
    }

    public function closeConnection(){
        $this->connection = null;
    }

    public function insert($query, array $data){        
        $this->connection->prepare($query)->execute($data);     
        return $this->connection->lastInsertId();
    }

    public function update($query, array $data) {
        $stmt = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        $stmt->execute($data);
        return $stmt->rowCount();       
    }

    public function delete($query, array $data) {
        $stmt = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        $stmt->execute($data);
        return $stmt->rowCount();       
    }
    public function findOne($query, array $data = null){        
        $sth = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        if($data != null){
            $sth->execute($data);
        }else{
            $sth->execute();
        }       
        if($sth->rowCount() == 1){              
            return $sth->fetchObject();
        }else{
            return null;
        }
    }
    public function find($query, array $data = null){       
        $sth = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        if($data != null){
            $sth->execute($data);
        }else{
            $sth->execute();
        }
        if($sth->rowCount() > 0){
            while($res = $sth->fetchObject()){              
                $results[] = $res;
            }
            return $results;            
        }else{
            return null;
        }
    }
}
?>

But when reading some articles I found out that this isn't good practice because PDO already is a database wrapper.

However, by code is much more readable as before. Now it's just

public function getArticle($id){       
        $article = $this->database->find("select name, date from articles ?",array($id));       

        $article = new article($article->name, $article->date);
        return $article;
    }

this code is much shorter and all the database logic is handled in the PDO wrapper class, otherwise I would have to repeat the code of the wrapper in every function and my code would be in a lot of places instead of one wrapper.

So is there a better way to use my code or is it a good way I'm using it.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Dunno why do you ask or where your doubts from, but to create a database wrapper class is the only proper way to handle SQL queries.

Although implementation asks for some improvements, the general idea and usage almost excellent. Yes, to reduce the amount of code from whole screen to just one line is one of the main benefits of such a class.

Speaking of improvements - PDO has some nice tricks to shorten your code:

public function find($query, array $data = null){       
    $sth = $this->connection->prepare($query);
    $sth->execute($data);
    return $sth->fetchAll(); 
}

would work exactly the same way as your version but take three times less code

Answering your question from comments on the sensibility of the creation such a class based on PDO:
Look, PDO is already a semi-DAL. As you can see, it is already a great improvement compared to mysqli. While mysqli apparently and undoubtedly require such a class created upon, PDO has many required features out of the box. So, one can use raw PDO indeed. And many a classes created upon PDO, indeed being useless. But still, PDO can benefit from some improvements too.

Look, although I indeed improved your PDO code, reducing number of lines to only three, mysqli-based version cannot be improved and require all the dozens lines of code. So, 3 lines are better than a dozen, but still one line of the find() function is better than three, isn't it? Yet there are always a room for some greater improvements. Some ideas you can get from my List Of The Cases Where PDO Fails in the tag wiki.

share|improve this answer
    
I got confused reading this article: codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/29362/…, the wrapper looks a lot like mine. So I started to doubt wether it is good practice to use my wrapper? Thanks for your improvement, still stuck on the mysqli thinking and getting used to the PDO handyness :) –  randomizer Aug 25 '13 at 8:01
    
That's good question yet very easy to explain. See update. –  Your Common Sense Aug 25 '13 at 8:15
    
Thanks for the update, I understand. But it's not clear to me why my wrapper is ok and the wrapper in the link I provided is not because they are pretty similar. Is it because mine is used in combination to store and retrieve entities. Because I can understand that using the wrapper as a stand alone is indeed unnecessary and removing functionality. Just want to know if I'm on the right track :) –  randomizer Aug 25 '13 at 16:38
    
Ok, glanced at that class. It is quite all right, save for those insert/update/delete functions which I find useless and inflexible. Most of commenters there just have no clue. A class is a great thing to encapsulate A LOT of useful things AND avoid repetitions at the same time: Query logging. Query profiling. Additional placeholders support. Helper functions to get various kinds of data. Yes, PDO supports some of these features. that's why I called it a "semi-DAL". but it still can benefit from a wrapper a lot. One who said "PDO is as good as it gets" just have no imagination (nor experience) –  Your Common Sense Aug 25 '13 at 16:40

A better way to store your database connection is in a singleton-class.

http://php.net/manual/de/language.oop5.patterns.php

<?php
class DatabasePDO
{
    private static $instance;

    private $connection;

    private $host = "";
    private $username = "";
    private $password = "";
    private $dbname = "";

    public static function getInstance()
    {
        if (!isset(self::$instance)) {
            self::$instance = new DatabasePDO();
        }

        return self::$instance;
    }

    public function openConnection(){
        $this->connection = new PDO("mysql:host=$this->host;dbname=$this->dbname",$this->username,$this->password);
        $this->connection->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);     
    }

    public function getConnection(){
        return $this->connection;
    }

    public function closeConnection(){
        $this->connection = null;
    }

    public function insert($query, array $data){        
        $this->connection->prepare($query)->execute($data);     
        return $this->connection->lastInsertId();
    }

    public function update($query, array $data) {
        $stmt = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        $stmt->execute($data);
        return $stmt->rowCount();       
    }

    public function delete($query, array $data) {
        $stmt = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        $stmt->execute($data);
        return $stmt->rowCount();       
    }
    public function findOne($query, array $data = null){        
        $sth = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        if($data != null){
            $sth->execute($data);
        }else{
            $sth->execute();
        }       
        if($sth->rowCount() == 1){              
            return $sth->fetchObject();
        }else{
            return null;
        }
    }
    public function find($query, array $data = null){       
        $sth = $this->connection->prepare($query);
        if($data != null){
            $sth->execute($data);
        }else{
            $sth->execute();
        }
        if($sth->rowCount() > 0){
            while($res = $sth->fetchObject()){              
                $results[] = $res;
            }
            return $results;            
        }else{
            return null;
        }
    }
}
?>

With this code you can get your database connection from anywhere by calling DatabasePDO::getInstance()->getConnection();

public function getArticle($id){        
    $query = "SELECT title,date from articles where id = ?"; 

    $database = DatabasePDO::getInstance();

    if ($stmt = $database->getConnection()->prepare($query)) {            
        $stmt->bind_param('i',$id);
        $stmt->execute();
        $stmt->bind_result($title,$date);   
        $stmt->store_result();
        $stmt->fetch();         
        if(($stmt->num_rows) == 1){
            $article = new Article();
            $article->title = $title;
            $article->date = $date;
            $stmt->close();             
            return $article;
        }else{
            $stmt->close();
            return null;
        }           
    }else{          
        throw new Exception($database->getConnection()->error);
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
you completely missed the purpose of this class. –  Your Common Sense Aug 24 '13 at 18:36
    
I really don't want to use a singleton for my database but that's another discussion. –  randomizer Aug 25 '13 at 8:02

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