Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently have an AngularJS app with routing built in and it works perfectly with static controller property assignments. but what I really want to do is to dynamically assign controllers with different routes:

$routeProvider
 .when("/Dashboards/:dashboardName",{
    templateUrl:function(params) {
                 return "Dashboards/" + params.dashboardName;
                //some ASP.NET MVC calls to return partial views (this part works)
        }
  })

What I would like to do is to do the same thing about my controller property here, like:

$routeProvider
 .when("/Dashboards/:dashboardName",{
       templateUrl:function(params) {
             return "Dashboards/" + params.dashboardName;
            //some ASP.NET MVC calls to return partial views (this part works)
           },
       controller: function(params) {
             return params.dashboardName+"Controller"; (this part DOESN'T work)
           }
  })

but as it seems I am get an error saying paramsProvider is not found

so is there any way I could dynamically load my controller function name in route configuration?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

I solved this issue by not specifying the controller in $routeProvider but instead placing it in the file specified in templateURL.

$routeProvider
 .when("/Dashboards/:dashboardName",{
    templateUrl:function(params) {
                 return "Dashboards/" + params.dashboardName;
        }
  })

In DashboardsNAME.html

<div class="container" ng-Controller='DashboardsNAMEController'>Food</div>

This technique still requires that at some point before the route is instantiated you have registered DashboardsNAMEController. I suspect that the best place to do it is in the module.run() method with call to your own service but I do it in my main controller because it works and is a short controller anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
This works, but I do not understand why the other way does not work. –  Bradley Trager Jan 7 '14 at 19:05
    
@BradleyTrager Which other one? –  Nathaniel Johnson Jan 7 '14 at 19:10
    
The one in the question where the controller is specified in a function on the route provider. –  Bradley Trager Jan 7 '14 at 19:16
1  
He is linking a function that will act as a controller to the route. The routeParams are not available to that controller. If he wants the controller to be params.dashboardName+"Controller" he needs to turn that line into an expression like : controller: params.dashboardName+"Controller" and not wrap it in a function. –  Nathaniel Johnson Jan 7 '14 at 19:24
    
Thank you, I get it now! Now I am just wondering how to get the "params" without wrapping it in a function. –  Bradley Trager Jan 7 '14 at 19:28

I have been attempting this same thing. One solution I've found is to do this inside your routeProvider:

 $routeProvider
    .when("/Dashboards/:dashboardName",{
        templateUrl:function(params) {
            return "Dashboards/" + params.dashboardName;
        },
        controller: 'dynamicController'
 });

And then you do your calculation for what "pseudo-controller" (for lack of a better name) to load inside of the "dynamicController" definition.

var controllers = {
    unoController: function($scope, $routeParams, $rootScope) {
        // Do whatever
    },
    dosController: function($scope, $routeParams, $rootScope) {
        // Whatever for this controller
    }
}

app.controller('dynamicController', ['$scope', '$routeParams', '$rootScope', function($scope, $routeParams, $rootScope) {
    controllers[$routeParams.dashboardName+"Controller"]($scope, $routeParams, $rootScope);
}]);

This assumes that $routeParams.dashboardName is one of ["uno","dos"].

Take this with a grain of salt as I've only had about 3 days with Angular, but so far this approach has worked great for what I'm trying to accomplish.

share|improve this answer

I have been working on this same problem for some time now. Thanks to Nathaniel Johnson for helping me understand the problem. Here is the solution I am using.

The angular ui-router is in my opinion a much more sophisticated router than the standard one.

The ui-router lets you specify a "controllerProvider" to specify a function for providing a controller. So the solution would look like this:

$stateProvider
.state("/Dashboards/:dashboardName",{
   templateUrl:function($stateParams) {
         return "Dashboards/" + $stateParams.dashboardName;
       },
   controllerProvider: function($stateParams) {
         return $stateParams.dashboardName+"Controller";
       }
  })

I hope it helps!

share|improve this answer
    
ah, I reread the question and understand what was being asked (and removed my answer). Your solution will work to dynamically determine the controller's name, but the controller would still need to be fetched and loaded from the server dynamically which doesn't appear to be part of the question, but an FYI for future readers. –  TheSharpieOne Jan 7 '14 at 20:37

I don't know if it depends on AngularJS version but you can serve a function to the controller property, the function becoming the actual controller. Using this fact in conjunction with controller inheritance you can obtain a more condensed code like the one you were looking for, I think:

$routeProvider
.when("/Dashboards/:dashboardName",{
    templateUrl:function(params) {
        return "Dashboards/" + params.dashboardName;
    },
    controller: function($scope, $routeParams, $controller) {
        /* this creates a child controller which, 
           if served as it is, should accomplish 
           your goal behaving as the actual controller
           (params.dashboardName + "Controller") */
        $controller($routeParams.dashboardName + "Controller", {$scope:$scope});
    }
})

Disclaimer: I honestly don't know if this approach has any drawbacks. Doesn't look so though.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to play well with resolves. –  N13 Aug 25 '14 at 13:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.