Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand it is useful to preallocate a vector or a matrix, because they are always stored in a contiguous memory block.

However, in terms of a list, it can contains elements of difference length and modes. So my first guess is that a list might merely contains pointers to the true address of its elements. Am I correct? A related question here What is the internal implementation of lists? It says the list is essentially an array, but it does't cover how the elements are stored in a list while size of each element may change.

Example 1: If a list contains a,b,c,d,e, and when myList$a<-1:1000000, is the list modified in place (which means only a is updated) or the whole list are copied and updated?

Example 2

> system.time( { myList <- list()
+                myList$a <- 1:10000000
+                myList$b <- 1:10000100
+                myList$c <- 1:10000200 
+                myList$d <- 1:10000300})
   user  system elapsed 
   0.01    0.02    0.03

> system.time({ myList2<-list(a=1:10000000,b=1:10000100,c=1:10000200,d=1:10000300) })
   user  system elapsed 
   0.00    0.03    0.03 

would myList be very inefficient compared to myList2 due to no preallocation? Or no noticeable performance difference at all no matter how large a,b,c,d are because the first one copies only pointers a few times more?

Here comes to preallocation. How does it look like for a list? Does it only preallocate the memory for the pointers? If that's the case, I don't see any use since there won't be much data copying for pointers anyway.

> system.time( { myList <- vector("list", 4)
+                myList[[1]] <- 1:10000000
+                myList[[2]] <- 1:10000100
+                myList[[3]]  <- 1:10000200 
+                myList[[4]] <- 1:10000300
+                names(myList) <- letters[1:4]})
   user  system elapsed 
   0.01    0.02    0.03 
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of What's the internal implement of R list –  Ferdinand.kraft Aug 25 '13 at 1:25
2  
A side note to your question, if you do want something which stores pointers to the elements you should use environments rather than lists. –  Scott Ritchie Aug 25 '13 at 12:32
1  
This may be useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/17046336/… –  Ferdinand.kraft Aug 25 '13 at 14:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is too long for a comment -- but not a complete answer.

Named lists are treated differently to unnamed lists in terms of copying when modified.

Copying (for large objects)

This is a complex issue. See http://radfordneal.wordpress.com/2013/07/02/fixing-rs-named-problems-in-pqr/ for a reasonable explanation and note that some of these changes are being implemented in the development version of R. Also see http://r.789695.n4.nabble.com/Confused-about-NAMED-td4103326.html for more understanding of the underlying complexities

Here are some timings for various possibilities of preallocation

# preallocated contents so timing is list related only
.a <- seq_len(1e6); .b <- seq_len((1e6 + 1))
.c <- seq_len((1e6 + 2)); .d <- seq_len((1e6 + 3))



f1 <- function(){
# using `$<-` empty list
  x <- list()
  x$a <- .a
  x$b <- .b
  x$c <- .c 
  x$d <- .d
  x
}


f2 <- function(){
  # using `[[<-` on empty list
  x <- list()
  x[['a']] <- .a
  x[['b']] <- .b
  x[['c']] <- .c
  x[['d']] <- .d
  x
}


f3 <- function(){
  # using `[[<-` on empty list, naming later
  x <- list()
  x[[1]] <- .a
  x[[2]] <- .b
  x[[3]] <- .c
  x[[4]] <- .d
  names(x) <- letters[1:4]
  x
}

f4 <- function(){ 
  # just define the list
  x <- list(a = .a, b = .b,
            c = .c, d = .d)
}


f5 <- function(){ 
  # create a list of length 4, then fill and name
  x <- vector(mode = 'list', length = 4)
  x[[1]] <- .a
  x[[2]] <- .b
  x[[3]] <- .c
  x[[4]] <- .d
  names(x) <- letters[1:4]
  x
}

# f6 <- function(){
#  # this doesn't work!
#  # it creates a list of length 8
#  x <- vector(mode = 'list', length = 4)
#  x[['a']] <- .a
#  x[['b']] <- .b
#  x[['c']] <- .c
#  x[['d']] <- .d
#  x
# }


f7 <-function(){
# pre allocate list, name then fill
x <- vector(mode = 'list', length = 4)
  names(x) <- letters[1:4]
  x[[1]] <- .a
  x[[2]] <- .b
  x[[3]] <- .c
  x[[4]] <- .d
  x
}

f8 <- function(){
# preallocate correct length and then name
# and fill by name
  x <- vector(mode = 'list', length = 4)
  names(x) <- letters[1:4]
  x[['a']] <- .a
  x[['b']] <- .b
  x[['c']] <- .c
  x[['d']] <- .d
  x
}

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(f1(),f2(),f3(),f4(),f5(),f7(),f8(),times=100)


microbenchmark(f1(),f2(),f3(),f4(),f5(),f7(),f8(),times=100)
# Unit: microseconds
#   expr      min       lq   median       uq       max neval
#   f1()    6.038   11.169   12.980   14.791    34.110   100
#   f2() 2528.881 4387.962 4707.014 6472.823 74586.266   100
#   f3() 2532.805 4537.376 4714.258 5353.722 74903.206   100
#   f4() 2475.756 4531.489 4721.503 6331.860 74460.395   100
#   f5() 2508.959 4512.474 4759.535 6673.551  7966.668   100
#   f7() 2545.181 4477.761 4709.127 6372.610  7964.856   100
#   f8() 2508.053 4467.799 4669.131 6181.993 74236.726   100
#
#  All results are identical.
all(identical(f1(),f2()),identical(f1(),f3()),
    identical(f1(),f4()),identical(f1(),f5()),
    identical(f1(),f7()),identical(f1(),f8()))

# [1] TRUE

All results are identical.

Clearly using $<-` on an empty list is the clear winner. This goes against my thinking of what should be quickest

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I came from the world of C# and F#. But I have to use R at work. The more I learned about R, the more I hate R. –  colinfang Aug 26 '13 at 1:04
 system.time( { myList <- list()
   myList$a <- 1:100000
   myList$b <- 1:100001
   myList$c <- 1:100002 
   myList$d <- 1:100003})
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.019   0.001   0.022 

 system.time({ myList<-list(a=1:100000,b=1:100001,c=1:100002,d=1:100003) })
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.001   0.001   0.002 

Generally pre-allocation is advised, although what you did didn't look like what I think of as pre-allocation. This is what I would have given that description.

system.time( { myList <- vector("list", 4)
   myList[[1]] <- 1:100000
   myList[[2]] <- 1:100001
   myList[[3]]  <- 1:100002 
   myList[[4]] <- 1:100003
   names(myList) <- letters[1:4]})
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.001   0.001   0.001 

BTW: I do not think that the mental model of a list being just a pointer is useful. Many times simple assignment creates an entirely new temporary copy which then gets reassigned that name.

share|improve this answer
    
I was not able to reproduce you result... –  colinfang Aug 25 '13 at 12:01
    
I wasn't able to reproduce on a different machine, and I think the example may be too small to demonstrate a real difference anyway. It's possible that R may effective preallocate some number of leaves and it is only when you exceed that number that the advantage appears. Timings in this case may be overwhelmed by other aspects of evaluation and assignment. I would think you might want to preallocate a 50 element lsit vector and comapre times to extending a list to reach 50 elements and see if the difference appears. –  BondedDust Aug 25 '13 at 21:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.