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Possible Duplicate:
How do I determine if my python shell is executing in 32bit or 64bit mode?

I'm doing some work with the windows registry. Depending on whether you're running python as 32-bit or 64-bit, the key value will be different. How do I detect if Python is running as a 64-bit application as opposed to a 32-bit application?

Note: I'm not interested in detecting 32-bit/64-bit Windows - just the Python platform.

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marked as duplicate by Bill the Lizard Sep 26 '12 at 12:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
the question marked as duplicate is targetted on OSX, this question is different. Vote to reopen – CharlesB May 29 '13 at 9:38
up vote 69 down vote accepted
import platform
platform.architecture()

From the Python docs:

Queries the given executable (defaults to the Python interpreter binary) for various architecture information.

Returns a tuple (bits, linkage) which contain information about the bit architecture and the linkage format used for the executable. Both values are returned as strings.

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While it may work on some platforms, be aware that platform.architecture is not always a reliable way to determine whether python is running in 32-bit or 64-bit. In particular, on some OS X multi-architecture builds, the same executable file may be capable of running in either mode, as the example below demonstrates. The quickest safe multi-platform approach is to test sys.maxsize on Python 2.6, 2.7, Python 3.x.

$ arch -i386 /usr/local/bin/python2.7
Python 2.7.9 (v2.7.9:648dcafa7e5f, Dec 10 2014, 10:10:46)
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import platform, sys
>>> platform.architecture(), sys.maxsize
(('64bit', ''), 2147483647)
>>> ^D
$ arch -x86_64 /usr/local/bin/python2.7
Python 2.7.9 (v2.7.9:648dcafa7e5f, Dec 10 2014, 10:10:46)
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import platform, sys
>>> platform.architecture(), sys.maxsize
(('64bit', ''), 9223372036854775807)
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Cool thanks for the detail. – nbolton Dec 3 '09 at 20:36
    
Interesting gotcha. That smells a bit like a bug though. Is it supposed to work that way? – John La Rooy Dec 3 '09 at 20:44
2  
I would consider it a bug. Looking at the code in the platform module, it seems to be a bit fragile and in this case it has to do with the way Apple implemented their multi-arch selection feature. I'm adding a note to ensure we look at this when the python.org OS X multi-arch selection feature is finalized. – Ned Deily Dec 3 '09 at 20:59
    
(I've also opened a bug with Apple.) – Ned Deily Dec 3 '09 at 21:44
4  
On Windows x64 Python, sys.maxint == 2147483647 so no dice there. That's because a C int on Windows is 32 bits for 32 and 64 bit. – David Heffernan Mar 21 '12 at 13:07

You can try platform.architecture

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