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The System.Collections.ObjectModel.KeyedCollection class is a very useful alternative to System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary, especially when the key data is part of the object being stored or you want to be able to enumerate the items in order. Unfortunately, the class is abstract, and I am unable to find a general concrete implementation in the core .NET framework.

The Framework Design Guidlines book indicates that a concrete implementation should be provided for abstract types (section 4.4 Abstract Class Design). Why would the framework designers leave out a general concrete implementation of such a useful class, especially when it could be provided by simply exposing a constructor that accepts and stores a Converter from the item to its key:

public class ConcreteKeyedCollection<TKey, TItem> : KeyedCollection<TKey, TItem>
{
    private Converter<TItem, TKey> getKeyForItem = null;
    public ConcreteKeyedCollection(Converter<TItem, TKey> getKeyForItem)
    {
        if (getKeyForItem == null) { throw new ArgumentNullException("getKeyForItem"); }
        this.getKeyForItem = getKeyForItem;
    }
    protected override TKey GetKeyForItem(TItem item)
    {
        return this.getKeyForItem(item);
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are concrete implementations, including (but not limited to):

To the spirit of your question, no there is no generic implementation and since I do not work for Microsoft I could only speculate. Since the concrete implementation is as easy as you've shown, I won't offer any speculation (as it would probably be wrong).

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Here is the implementation I came up with

public class LookupKeyedCollection<TKey, TItem> : KeyedCollection<TKey, TItem>
{
    private Func<TItem, TKey> _getKeyFunc;

    public LookupKeyedCollection(Func<TItem, TKey> getKeyFunc)
    {
        _getKeyFunc = getKeyFunc;
    }

    //Required KeyedCollection implementation
    protected override TKey GetKeyForItem(TItem item)
    {
        return _getKeyFunc(item);
    }

    public bool TryGetItem(TKey key, out TItem item)
    {
        if (Dictionary == null)
        {
            item = default(TItem);
            return false;
        }

        return Dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out item);
    }

    public void AddOrUpdate(TItem item)
    {
    Remove(_getKeyFunc(item));
    Add(item);
    }

    public new bool Contains(TItem item)
    {
        return base.Contains(_getKeyFunc(item));
    }
}

The reasoning behind the methods can be mostly found in the following:

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What's the public new bool Contains(TItem item) method for? –  HappyNomad Mar 10 at 21:09
    
See the first link (it was broken, so I switched to the wayback machine ) –  Ohad Schneider Mar 15 at 11:42
    
Better call it TryGetItem. –  nawfal May 19 at 13:53
    
@nawfal I believe the point is to mask the original Contains, which arguably has the wrong semantics. –  Ohad Schneider May 19 at 17:55
1  
Sure, that makes sense - thanks! Edited –  Ohad Schneider May 20 at 15:59

Here is one that I came up with. It either hard codes the property names or you can use the [Key] attribute if you'd like.

    ///// <summary>
///// Creates an indexed list.  Requires that [Key] attribute be applied to a property in TValue object.
///// </summary>
///// <example>
///// public class Test
///// {
/////     [Key]
/////     public int Id { get; set; }
///// }
///// 
///// IndexedList<int, Test> tests;
///// </example>
///// <typeparam name="TKey"></typeparam>
///// <typeparam name="TValue"></typeparam>
public class IndexedList<TKey, TValue> : KeyedCollection<TKey, TValue>
{
    PropertyInfo keyProperty;

    public IndexedList()
    {
        foreach (var property in typeof(TValue).GetProperties())
        {
            // this requires .net 4, which I couldn't use due to the WPF shadow effect deprication
            //if (property.PropertyType == typeof(TKey) && property.IsDefined(typeof(KeyAttribute), true))

            if (property.PropertyType == typeof(TKey) && (property.Name.ToUpper() == "ID" || property.Name.ToUpper() == "KEY"))
            {
                keyProperty = property;
                return;
            }
        }

        throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("Unable to find a property in {0} that is named Id or Key and is of type {1}.", typeof(TValue).Name, typeof(TKey).Name));
    }

    protected override TKey GetKeyForItem(TValue item)
    {
        return (TKey)keyProperty.GetValue(item, null);
    }
}
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"IndexedList" sounds a little redundant. A list is basically indexed in .NET. It doesnt give the idea of keyed indexing either. "KeyedList" sounds better. –  nawfal May 19 at 14:19

The reason that there's no concrete implementation is that it won't be serializable (you can't serialize a delegate). All collections in the BCL are serializable.

That's why it's better to inherit and override the method, especially when you can't predict how the collection is going to be used.

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