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Simply put I want to know how to get the functionality on this page: in Microsoft Excel.

I tried with the FV functon but it does not seem to have support to increase the payments every year.

The increase in payments could be specified in percentage points (as in the page linked to) or even by a fixed amount every year (like "increase deposit by 10000 every year).

An illustration:
Year 1:

Monthly Deposit: 5000
No. of deposits in a year: 12
Interest rate: 10%
Interest compounded quarterly
Total deposited during the year: **60000**
Interest earned in first year: **3323**

Year 2:

Amount carried forward from first year: **603323** (principal + Interest)
Monthly Deposit: 5500 (increased by 10% or increased by a fixed value of 500 every year)
No. of deposits in a year: 12
Interest rate: 10%
Interest compounded quarterly
Total deposited during the year: 66000
Interest earned during year: 13552 (large, because we started the year with seed value from previous year)

and so on...

The FV function gives me correct value for year 1, but I could not find a way to extrapolate it to increase investment every year.

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I don't know how to do the quartlerly interest, it may be because I using excel 2003. I have a solution for a monthly compound that you should be able to modify. The formular in cells b10 is =FV($B$2/12, $B$3, $B$4+A9*$B$7, -$B9,$B$6) to add extra years put the year number in column A and copy and paste the formular in column B. It takes the previous years result as the pv and adds the value iin B7 to the payment rate for each additional year.

Screenshot

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