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I've been looking at Go's goroutines lately and thought it would be nice to have something similar in Java. As far as I've searched the common way to parallelize a method call is to do something like:

final String x = "somethingelse";
new Thread(new Runnable() {
           public void run() {
                x.matches("something"); 			
	}
}).start();

Thats not very elegant. Is there a better way of doing this? I needed such a solution in a project so I decided to implement my own wrapper class around a async method call.

I published my wrapper class in J-Go. But I don't know if it is a good solution. The usage is simple:

SampleClass obj = ...
FutureResult<Integer> res = ...
Go go = new Go(obj);
go.callLater(res, "intReturningMethod", 10);         //10 is a Integer method parameter
//... Do something else
//...
System.out.println("Result: "+res.get());           //Blocks until intReturningMethod returns

or less verbose:

Go.with(obj).callLater("myRandomMethod");
//... Go away
if (Go.lastResult().isReady())                //Blocks until myRandomMethod has ended
    System.out.println("Method is finished!");

Internally I'm using a class that implements Runnable and do some Reflection work to get the correct method object and invoking it.

I want some opinion about my tiny library and on the subject of making async method calls like this in Java. Is it safe? Is there already a simplier way?

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Can you show your code of J-Go lib again? –  msangel Sep 11 '13 at 19:00

5 Answers 5

You may wish to also consider the class java.util.concurrent.FutureTask.

If you are using Java 5 or later, FutureTask is a turnkey implementation of "A cancellable asynchronous computation."

There are even richer asynchronous execution scheduling behaviors available in the java.util.concurrent package (for example, ScheduledExecutorService), but FutureTask may have all the functionality you require.

I would even go so far as to say that it is no longer advisable to use the first code pattern you gave as an example ever since FutureTask became available. (Assuming you are on Java 5 or later.)

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The thing is I just want to execute one method call. This way I would have to change the implementation of the target class. The thing I wanted is exactly call without having to worry about impĺementing Runnable or Callable –  Felipe Hummel Dec 4 '09 at 2:45
    
I hear you. Java does not (yet) have first-class functions, so this is the state of the art right now. –  shadit Dec 4 '09 at 5:11
    
thanks for the 'future' keywords... now I'm opening the tutorials about them... very useful. :D –  gumuruh Jun 7 '12 at 8:50
    
-1 as far as I can tell, FutureTask by itself is not sufficient to run anything asynchronously. You still need to create a Thread or Executor to run it, as in Carlos' example. –  MikeFHay Jul 10 '13 at 10:21

i don't like the idea of using Reflection for that.
Not only dangerous for missing it in some refactoring, but it can also be denied by SecurityManager.

FutureTask is a good option as the other options from the java.util.concurrent package.
My favorite for simple tasks:

    Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor().submit(task);

little bit shorter than creating a Thread (task is a Callable or a Runnable)

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The thing is I just want to execute one method call. This way I would have to change the implementation of the target class. The thing I wanted is exactly call without having to worry about impĺementing Runnable or Callable –  Felipe Hummel Dec 4 '09 at 2:44
    
then this would'nt help much :( but normally I would prefer using a Runnable or Callable instead of Reflection –  Carlos Heuberger Dec 4 '09 at 12:43
    
Just a short note: It's nicer to keep track of the ExecutorService instance, so you can call shutdown() when you have to. –  Daniel Szalay Jun 12 '12 at 9:36

I just discovered that there is a cleaner way to do your

new Thread(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        //Do whatever
    }
}).start();

(At least in Java 8), you can use a lambda expression to shorten it to:

Thread a = new Thread(() -> {
    //Do whatever
});

As simple as making a function in JS!

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Your answer helped my problem - stackoverflow.com/questions/27009448/…. Little tricky to apply my situatioin, but worked it out eventually :) –  Deckard Nov 19 '14 at 6:56

You can use @Async annotation from jcabi-aspects and AspectJ:

public class Foo {
  @Async
  public void save() {
    // to be executed in the background
  }
}

When you call save(), a new thread starts and executes its body. Your main thread continues without waiting for the result of save().

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This is not really related but if I was to asynchronously call a method e.g. matches(), I would use:

private final static ExecutorService service = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
public static Future<Boolean> matches(final String x, final String y) {
    return service.submit(new Callable<Boolean>() {

        @Override
        public Boolean call() throws Exception {
            return x.matches(y);
        }

    });
}

Then to call the asynchronous method I would use:

String x = "somethingelse";
try {
    System.out.println("Matches: "+matches(x, "something").get());
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (ExecutionException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

I have tested this and it works. Just thought it may help others if they just came for the "asynchronous method".

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