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I wanted to compare two different ways of testing odd or even and I thought of testing which is faster so I tried using the clock() function and clock_t variables.

Nothing seemed to work. I searched a lot on the web and modified my code based on answers I found on stackoverflow, but still nothing.

This is my code:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<time.h>
#include<stdint.h>
clock_t startm, stopm;
#define START if ( (startm = clock()) == -1) {printf("Error calling clock");exit(1);}
#define STOP if ( (stopm = clock()) == -1) {printf("Error calling clock");exit(1);}
#define PRINTTIME printf( "%ju ticks used by the processor.", (uintmax_t)(stopm-startm));
#define COUNT 18446744073709551600
#define STEP COUNT/100

int timetest(void){
    unsigned long long int i = 0, y =0 , x = 76546546545541; // x  = a random big odd number
    clock_t startTime,stopTime;
    printf("\nstarting bitwise method :\n");
    START;
    for(i = 0 ; i < COUNT ; i++){
        if(x&1) y=1;
    }
    STOP;
    printf("\n");
    PRINTTIME;

    y=0;
    printf("\nstarting mul-div method :\n");
    START;  
    for(i = 0; i < COUNT ; i++){     
        if(((x/2)*2) != x ) y=1;
    }
    STOP;
    printf("\n");
    PRINTTIME;
    printf("\n\n");
    return 0;
}

I'm always getting 0 ticks used by the processor. as the output.

Any help would be highly appreciated.

edit :

iv had enough of compiler issues. created a java version of the above program. gives me answers. though its for the java platform.

public class test {
    private final static int count = 500000000;
    private final static long num = 55465465465465L;
    private final static int loops = 25;
    private long runTime;
    private long result;
    private long bitArr[] = new long[loops];
    private long mulDivArr[] = new long[loops];
    private double meanVal;

    private void bitwiser() {
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
            result = num & 1;
        }
    }

    private void muldiv() {
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
            result = (num / 2) * 2;
        }
    }

    public test() {
        // run loops and gather info
        for (int i = 0; i < loops; i++) {
            runTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            bitwiser();
            runTime = System.currentTimeMillis() - runTime;
            bitArr[i] = runTime;
            runTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            muldiv();
            runTime = System.currentTimeMillis() - runTime;
            mulDivArr[i] = runTime;
        }
        // calculate stats
        meanVal = stats.mean(bitArr);
        System.out.println("bitwise time : " + meanVal);
        meanVal = stats.mean(mulDivArr);
        System.out.println("muldiv time : " + meanVal);

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new test();
    }
}

final class stats {
    private stats() {
        // empty
    }

    public static double mean(long[] a) {
        if (a.length == 0)
            return Double.NaN;
        long sum = sum(a);
        return (double) sum / a.length;
    }

    public static long sum(long[] a) {
        long sum = 0L;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
            sum += a[i];
        }
        return sum;
    }

}

output (in millisecs) :

bitwise time : 1109.52
muldiv time : 1108.16

on average , bitwise seems to be a tad slower than muldiv.

share|improve this question
    
Have you printed the actual value of your clock_t variables? The spec doesn't guarantee that the processor clock time will be available. –  chrylis Aug 25 '13 at 10:26
    
Did you look at the warnings ? –  P0W Aug 25 '13 at 10:29
    
@chrylis , i dont know how to print clock_t , so i did this printf("start : %ju",(uintmax_t)startm); , however , this gave output as 0. –  Somjit Nag Aug 25 '13 at 10:47
    
@P0W , i didnt get any warnings. im using pelles C –  Somjit Nag Aug 25 '13 at 10:49
    
If you use a smaller value for COUNT (so that you can see results more quickly) do you still get 0 ticks ...? (I tried this and got non-zero values) –  Burhan Ali Aug 25 '13 at 11:01

1 Answer 1

This:

#define COUNT 18446744073709551600

will overflow, you must append ULL to make the literal have type unsigned long long.

share|improve this answer
    
like this ? #define COUNT 18446744073709551600ULL , well this do anything different. –  Somjit Nag Aug 25 '13 at 10:51
    
Indeed. Using gcc I got this warning: warning: integer constant is so large that it is unsigned –  Burhan Ali Aug 25 '13 at 10:51
    
@BurhanAli im using pelles C , i didnt get any warnings. something might be wrong here. –  Somjit Nag Aug 25 '13 at 10:53
    
@SomjitNag I don't know pelles-C, but have you enabled all warnings? Compilers don't generate all possible warnings by default. You should check your compiler's docs and see what command line arguments are needed to do that. –  Lorenzo Donati Aug 25 '13 at 13:03

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