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I've a .NET windows service that should start at 7:00 and stop at 23:00 each day, running continuously in background.

While I can code the service so that it sleep between 23 and 7, I would prefer a system configuration (something like cron in unix).

How can I do this on Windows 7?

Note that, if system boot up after 7:00, the service should start immediatly.

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Not sure I'd bother with this route unless I had a number of services I needed this sort of behavior and I wanted some way of externally managing their configurations –  Tony Hopkinson Aug 25 '13 at 11:33
    
Actually, I have 3 services that should start and stop at the same times. –  Giacomo Tesio Aug 26 '13 at 7:22
    
Scheduling service if you want to seem them in services.msc, or the ServiceHost and some sort of custom applet to manange it if you don't then. –  Tony Hopkinson Aug 26 '13 at 11:01

3 Answers 3

Seeing as you need another service to manage the scheduling of the services. Write a service, that hosts service like thingies. The host deals with starting and stopping, even restarting in the event of a crash. You can even get clever and get it to look up with "services" to load an run, and applet to see what's going on and tweak the schedule , register and unregister services with the host.

An approach anyway.

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Or you could write another service, let's call it guard which runs always und starts the other service depending on a config file for example.

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You could use Windows task scheduler for this task or a schedule task.

Also Windows AT command is very similar to Cron in Unix

"The AT command schedules commands and programs to run on a computer at a specified time and date. The Schedule service must be running to use the AT command."

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