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I have multiple lines like:

"390";"902";"from 4670000 to 4679999, from 4680000 to 4689999, from 9960000 to 9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 0770000 to 0779999, from 9170000 to 9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

What I need is:

"390";"902";"from 4670000 to 4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"from 4680000 to 4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"from 9960000 to 9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 0770000 to 0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 9170000 to 9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

As you can see I need to split variable3 on from/to tag (NOTE there is a space sometimes between ",").

Ideally, I need resulting output:

"390";"902";"4670000";"4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"4680000";"4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"9960000";"9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"0770000";"0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"9170000";"9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

I've already found out I can split via awk, but I'm not sure how to copy rest of the line:

awk -F\, '{                       
  for (i = 0; ++i <= NF;)
    print i, $i
  }' <<<'from 4670000 to 4679999, from 4680000 to 4689999, from 9960000 to 9969999'
1 from 4670000 to 4679999
2  from 4680000 to 4689999
3  from 9960000 to 9969999

Sorry, this is my first question here, feel free to point me how should I correct it in order to get it fully answered.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
+1 for sample input, required output and (gasp), an attempt to solve your problem. Keep posting! –  shellter Aug 25 '13 at 13:04
    
sorry, I'll add more examples next time! –  stackexch Aug 25 '13 at 16:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For an input of:

"390";"902";"from 4670000 to 4679999, from 4680000 to 4689999, from 9960000 to 9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 0770000 to 0779999, from 9170000 to 9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

This code

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN {
    FS = ";"
}

{
    t = $3
    gsub(/"/, "", t)
    n = split(t, a, /, /)
    for (i = 1; i <= n; ++i) {
        print $1 ";" $2 ";\"" a[i] "\";" $4 ";" $5 ";" $6
    }
}

Would give

"390";"902";"from 4670000 to 4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"from 4680000 to 4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"from 9960000 to 9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 0770000 to 0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 9170000 to 9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

Condensed form (I don't think it could really be called as a true "one-liner"):

awk -F ";" -- '{ t = $3; gsub(/"/, "", t); n = split(t, a, /, /); for (i = 1; i <= n; ++i) print $1 ";" $2 ";\"" a[i] "\";" $4 ";" $5 ";" $6 }'

And this code

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN {
    FS = ";"
}

{
    t = $3
    gsub(/"|from /, "", t)
    n = split(t, a, /, | to /)
    for (i = 1; i <= n; i += 2) {
        print $1 ";" $2 ";\"" a[i] "\";\"" a[i + 1] "\";"$4 ";" $5 ";" $6
    }
}

Would give

"390";"902";"4670000";"4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"4680000";"4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"9960000";"9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"0770000";"0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"9170000";"9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

Condensed form:

awk -F ";" -- '{ t = $3; gsub(/"|from /, "", t); n = split(t, a, /, | to /); for (i = 1; i <= n; i += 2) print $1 ";" $2 ";\"" a[i] "\";\"" a[i + 1] "\";"$4 ";" $5 ";" $6; }'

Script is tested with gawk, nawk and mawk.

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't work for that input: "390";"903";"from 0770000 to 0779999,from 9170000 to 9179999";"*";"something4";"09.09.04" –  Aleks-Daniel Jakimenko Aug 25 '13 at 12:58
    
@Aleks-DanielJakimenko I don't see that as part of the example. –  konsolebox Aug 25 '13 at 13:16
    
He said As you can see I need to split variable3 on from/to tag (NOTE there is a space sometimes between ","). which I understand like "sometimes there are spaces around ',' and sometimes there are no spaces" –  Aleks-Daniel Jakimenko Aug 25 '13 at 13:23
    
Assuming it's only sometimes and not always then you're correct. However it could it be easily solved by replacing any , expression to , ?. –  konsolebox Aug 25 '13 at 13:26

awk one-liner:

awk -F'";"' -v OFS='";"' '{n=split($3,a,/,\s*/);for(i=1;i<=n;i++){$3=a[i];print}}' file

outputs:

kent$  cat f
"390";"902";"from 4670000 to 4679999, from 4680000 to 4689999, from 9960000 to 9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 0770000 to 0779999, from 9170000 to 9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

kent$  awk -F'";"' -v OFS='";"' '{n=split($3,a,/,\s*/);for(i=1;i<=n;i++){$3=a[i];print}}' f
"390";"902";"from 4670000 to 4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"from 4680000 to 4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"from 9960000 to 9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 0770000 to 0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"from 9170000 to 9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"

EDIT

if you want the from...to to be parsed too, still an awk oneliner:

awk -F'";"' -v OFS='";"' '{n=split($3,a,/,\s*/);for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
{$3=a[i];sub(/\s*to\s*/,"\";\"",$3);sub(/\s*from\s*/,"",$3);print}}' file

test with same input file:

kent$  awk -F'";"' -v OFS='";"' '{n=split($3,a,/,\s*/);for(i=1;i<=n;i++){$3=a[i];sub(/\s*to\s*/,"\";\"",$3);sub(/\s*from\s*/,"",$3);print}}' f                              
"390";"902";"4670000";"4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"4680000";"4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"9960000";"9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"0770000";"0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"9170000";"9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
share|improve this answer
    
Note that he wants "from .. to .." field to be parsed as well. –  Aleks-Daniel Jakimenko Aug 25 '13 at 12:33
    
@Aleks-DanielJakimenko thx, I didn't notice he has actually two expected output in question. I added that part. –  Kent Aug 25 '13 at 12:38
    
for some reason your 2nd example leaves spaces in 3rd and 4th variables, e.g: gawk -F'";"' -v OFS='";"' '{n=split($3,a,/,\s*/);for(i=1;i<=n;i++){$3=a[i];sub(/\s*to\s*/,"\";\"",$3);sub(‌​/\s*from\s*/,"",$3);print}}' |head -2 "390";"901";" 6000000 ";" 6009999";"ОАО \"Ростелеком\" (ОАО \"Сибирьтелеком\")";"Республика Хакасия";"13.05.09" "";"954";" 1010000 ";" 1019999";"ЗАО \"Джи Ти Эн Ти\"";"Российская Федерация";"04.06.12" –  stackexch Aug 25 '13 at 15:58
$ cat tst.awk
BEGIN{ FS=OFS="\";\"" }
{
    gsub(/from /,"",$3)
    split($3,a,/ *, */)
    for (i=1;i in a;i++) {
        $3 = a[i]
        sub(/ to /,OFS,$3)
        print
    }
}
$
$ awk -f tst.awk file
"390";"902";"4670000";"4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"4680000";"4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"9960000";"9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"0770000";"0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"9170000";"9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
share|improve this answer

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/, /","/g;s/^(([^;]*;){2})([^,]*),([^;]*)(.*)/\1\3\5\n\1\4\5/;P;D' file
share|improve this answer
#!/bin/bash

filename='file.txt'
temp=$(mktemp)

sed 's/, */";"/g' "$filename" > "$temp" # replace commas with ;

echo -n > "$filename" # clear our file
while read line; do
    IFS=';' read -a fields <<< "$line" # make an array out of the string

    for ((i=2; i<${#fields[@]}-3; i++)); do
        from=$(echo "${fields[$i]}" | cut -d ' ' -f2)
        to=$(echo "${fields[$i]}" | cut -d ' ' -f4)
        echo "${fields[0]};${fields[1]};\"$from\";\"$to;${fields[-3]};${fields[-2]};${fields[-1]}" >> "$filename"
    done
done < "$temp"

rm "$temp"

exit 0

It is going to handle spaces before commas as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately it's not what I need. Please look more into the example I gave, I need to split the line via 3rd field and also copy rest of the line. I've already coded something in PHP, because I'm not that good in sed/awk, I'll post the solution here once I got it. –  stackexch Aug 25 '13 at 11:43
    
Got it. Hold on, I'll edit my answer –  Aleks-Daniel Jakimenko Aug 25 '13 at 11:53
1  
omg, all of those subprocesses you're creating to parse one line of text!? +1 for chutzpah in using shell and $() and ((...)) constructs, but learn about ${var/s/r}, ${var%x}, ${var%%x}, ${var#y}, ${var##y} (they probably have limited applicability on this question, and you may know about them already). Sadly, -1 for subprocesses, so . . . . a wash. Repent, repent and learn awk (or python or perl) ;-) Good luck to all. –  shellter Aug 25 '13 at 13:03
1  
@Aleks-DanielJakimenko I'm more of a fan of Bash than Awk but this time I don't think Bash could be simpler than Awk, and even more readable. Also, I think it's a waste to use cut and command substitution. You could have just used special parameter expansion methods like ${X##Y}, etc. –  konsolebox Aug 25 '13 at 13:18
2  
Would fail if something* contained commas or semi-colons or backslashes or .... A shell is for sequencing calls to tools, not for parsing text files - that's what awk was invented to do and is very good at it. –  Ed Morton Aug 25 '13 at 15:45

This is another way to do it in Bash:

#!/bin/bash

shopt -s extglob

IFS=';'

while read -a FIELDS; do
    TEMP=${FIELDS[2]//\"}
    read -a RANGES <<< "${TEMP//,?( )/;}"
    for A in "${RANGES[@]}"; do
        echo "${FIELDS[0]};${FIELDS[1]};\"$A\";${FIELDS[*]:3}"
    done
done

Run with

bash script.sh < file

That would give the first intended output.

Or

#!/bin/bash

shopt -s extglob

IFS=';'

while read -a FIELDS; do
    TEMP=${FIELDS[2]//@(\"|from )}
    read -a RANGES <<< "${TEMP//@(,?( )| to )/;}"
    for (( I = 0; I < ${#RANGES[@]}; I += 2 )); do
        echo "${FIELDS[0]};${FIELDS[1]};\"${RANGES[I]}\";\"${RANGES[I + 1]}\";${FIELDS[*]:3}"
    done
done

Which would get the second intended output.

share|improve this answer
    
That would fail if the text represented by something1, for example, contained a semi-colon. Separating the fields with the 3-char string ";" as shown in the sample input would be more robust. –  Ed Morton Aug 25 '13 at 15:42
    
@EdMorton Ok I made an update for the possibility. The solution does not necessarily need to be like your suggestion as Bash also has strengths over Awk even with text parsing or manipulation of strings. –  konsolebox Aug 25 '13 at 16:03
    
Interesting, that's not the solution I expected, I thought it'd be sed 's/";"/<some char>/g' | script | sed 's/<some char>/";"/g'. I actually can't see what that solution is doing! –  Ed Morton Aug 25 '13 at 16:17

Here is one way using . I know you didn't tag it, but seems easier for me to handle csv files with a good parser. It splits third field (row[2]) with commas, later it splits each string of that field in spaces and extract the odd ones (v.split()[1::2]).

Content of script.py:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import csv
import sys
import copy

with open(sys.argv[1], 'r') as f:
        csvfile = csv.reader(f, delimiter=';')
        csvout = csv.writer(sys.stdout, delimiter=';', quoting=csv.QUOTE_ALL)
        for row in csvfile:
                v3 = row[2].split(r', ')
                for v in v3:
                        newrow = copy.deepcopy(row)
                        fields = v.split()[1::2]
                        newrow[2:3] = fields
                        csvout.writerow(newrow)

Run it like:

python3 script.py infile

That yields:

"390";"902";"4670000";"4679999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"4680000";"4689999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"902";"9960000";"9969999";"something1";"something2";"20.09.04"
"390";"903";"0770000";"0779999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
"390";"903";"9170000";"9179999";"something3";"something4";"09.09.04"
share|improve this answer

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