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I was trying to answer another SO question and was suddenly faced with the following problem. Points should be assigned to the 3 highest scoring (mrk) groups (grp) of each class (sec). The highest scoring groups get 5 points, the second ranking ones 3 points and the groups in 3rd rank only 1 point. For all others pts should be set to null.

| ID | SEC | GRP | MRK |    PTS |
|----|-----|-----|-----|--------|
|  1 | cl2 |  ge |  32 | (null) |
|  2 | cl1 |  gb |  22 | (null) |
|  3 | cl1 |  gd |  22 | (null) |
|  4 | cl1 |  ge |  18 | (null) |
|  5 | cl2 |  ga |  26 | (null) |
|  6 | cl1 |  ga |  55 | (null) |
|  7 | cl2 |  gb |  66 | (null) |
|  8 | cl2 |  gc |  15 | (null) |
|  9 | cl1 |  gc |  12 | (null) |
| 10 | cl2 |  gf |   5 | (null) |
| 11 | cl2 |  ge |  66 | (null) |

I chose to work with user-defined variables as they provide maximum flexibility regarding the allocation scheme and soon came up with the following solution:

SELECT id,sec,grp,mrk,
CASE WHEN @s=sec THEN          -- whenever there is a new class ...
 CASE WHEN @m=mrk THEN @i ELSE -- issue the same points for 
                               -- identical scorers, otherwise ...
  CASE WHEN IF(@m:=mrk,@i,@i)>2 THEN @i:=@i-2  -- store mrk in @mrk and 
                               -- while @i>2 return points: 3 or 1 ...
                                ELSE @i:=null  -- no points for the rest
  END
 END
 ELSE NULLIF(@i:=5,(@s:=sec)=(@m:=mrk)) -- store sec in @s and mrk in @m
                                        -- and return points: 5
END pts
FROM tbl ORDER BY sec,mrk desc

Explanation of NULLIF(@i:=5,(@s:=sec)=(@m:=mrk)):

The expressions @s:=sec and @m:=mrk are both evaluated and then their values are compared by =. The result can either be 0 (false) or 1 (true) but it will definitely be unequal to 5, the other argument of the NULLIF function, therefore in the end only the first argument (5) will be returned. I chose the construct to make the two variable assignments happen without returning anything.

OK, maybe not the most straightforward solution ;-), but I did pay attention to define each variable only once for each record that is being processed, since "the order of evaluation for expressions involving user variables is undefined" mysql manual. The select indeed gives me the desired

result:

| ID | SEC | GRP | MRK |    PTS |
|----|-----|-----|-----|--------|
|  6 | cl1 |  ga |  55 |      5 |
|  2 | cl1 |  gb |  22 |      3 |
|  3 | cl1 |  gd |  22 |      3 |
|  4 | cl1 |  ge |  18 |      1 |
|  9 | cl1 |  gc |  12 | (null) |
|  7 | cl2 |  gb |  66 |      5 |
| 11 | cl2 |  ge |  66 |      5 |
|  1 | cl2 |  ge |  32 |      3 |
|  5 | cl2 |  ga |  26 |      1 |
|  8 | cl2 |  gc |  15 | (null) |
| 10 | cl2 |  gf |   5 | (null) |

Now, my question is:

How do I write an UPDATE statement along the same lines that will store the above calculated results in column pts?

My attempts so far have all failed:

UPDATE tbl SET pts=
CASE WHEN @s=sec THEN
 CASE WHEN @m=mrk THEN @i ELSE
  CASE WHEN IF(@m:=mrk,@i,@i)>2 THEN @i:=@i-2 
                                ELSE @i:=null 
  END
 END
 ELSE NULLIF(@i:=5,(@s:=sec)=(@m:=mrk)) 
END
ORDER BY sec,mrk desc

result:

| ID | SEC | GRP | MRK | PTS |
|----|-----|-----|-----|-----|
|  6 | cl1 |  ga |  55 |   5 |
|  2 | cl1 |  gb |  22 |   5 |
|  3 | cl1 |  gd |  22 |   5 |
|  4 | cl1 |  ge |  18 |   5 |
|  9 | cl1 |  gc |  12 |   5 |
|  7 | cl2 |  gb |  66 |   5 |
| 11 | cl2 |  ge |  66 |   5 |
|  1 | cl2 |  ge |  32 |   5 |
|  5 | cl2 |  ga |  26 |   5 |
|  8 | cl2 |  gc |  15 |   5 |
| 10 | cl2 |  gf |   5 |   5 |

Why does the update statement only get a single value (5) for pts?!?

You can find all the data and SQL statements in my SQLfiddle.

share|improve this question
    
what your wished update result. –  echo_Me Aug 25 '13 at 14:25
    
@echo_Me my desired UPDATE result is listed in my post under "The select indeed gives me the desired result:". FYI: I also tried inserting the SELECT output into a (temporary) table -> same result as shown at the bottom of my post :-( –  cars10 Aug 25 '13 at 15:38
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have tried to debug this case.
I've added 6 new columns to the tbl table: b_s, b_m, b_i and a_s, a_m, a_i
b_* - means "before", a_* - means "after",
and I've modified the query to:

UPDATE tbl SET 
   b_s = @s,
   b_m = @m,
   b_i = @i, 
pts=
CASE WHEN @s=sec THEN
 CASE WHEN @m=mrk THEN @i ELSE
  CASE WHEN IF(@m:=mrk,@i,@i)>2 THEN @i:=@i-2 
                                ELSE @i:=null 
  END
 END
 ELSE NULLIF(@i:=5,(@s:=sec)=(@m:=mrk)) 
END,
a_s = @s,
a_m = @m,
a_i = @i 
ORDER BY sec,mrk desc

My intent was to log values of variables before and after of the expression evaluation.

It's strange - I don't know why, but it seems that when you assign values to all variables before the execution of the update then the update works as expected.
Compare these two demos:

1 - wrong: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/2db3e4/1
2 - fine: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/37ff5/1

The only difference is this code fragment before the update:

set @i='alamakota';
set @m='alamakota';
set @s='alamakota';

Some kind on "magic string" :)

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting obervation and good idea with the before and after columns! I will play around with the fiddle too ... –  cars10 Aug 25 '13 at 21:16
    
Strange thing. Is it documented anywhere?!? Will there be a possibility of writing everything in a single statement (without the SET ... commands before)? –  cars10 Aug 25 '13 at 21:26
    
Well, that probably is the answer then: Variables you want to use in an UPDATE must be declared (they are also bound to a char-type) using some kind of SET statement before. (SET @s:=@m:=@i:='a' also works.) Although I have found a (simpler) example in the posts under the UPDATE section of the MySQL manual for switching columns: UPDATE tbl SET sec=(@v:=sec), sec=grp, grp=@v;. (This statement works without the previous SET.) However, in this example, the variable @v is never tested (has its value checked) in a CASE construct. –  cars10 Aug 26 '13 at 5:38
    
It seems a problem by not initializing user-defined variables, here's a curious example SQL Fiddle. The same query returns a wrong result but causes the UPDATE to work properly. On my server I reproduced the problem, but only happens the first time after restarting MySQL, the following sometimes works as expected. Similarly initializing variables to NULL SET @i := @s := @m := NULL; works as expected. –  wchiquito Aug 26 '13 at 13:42
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