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Without any code in the subclasses, I'd like an abstract class to have a different copy of a static variable for each subclass. In C#

abstract class ClassA
{
    static string theValue;

    // just to demonstrate
    public string GetValue()
    {
        return theValue;
    }
    ...
}
class ClassB : ClassA { }
class ClassC : ClassA { }

and (for example):

(new ClassB()).GetValue(); // returns "Banana"
(new ClassC()).GetValue(); // returns "Coconut"

My current solution is this:

abstract class ClassA
{
    static Dictionary<Type, string> theValue;
    public string GetValue()
    {
        return theValue[this.GetType()];
    }
    ...
}

While this works fine, I'm wondering if there's a more elegant or built-in way of doing this?

This is similar to Can I have different copies of a static variable for each different type of inheriting class, but I have no control over the subclasses

share|improve this question
    
You could probably do it by hacking a Dictionary<Type,...> and calling GetType(), but it would be horrible... –  Marc Gravell Dec 3 '09 at 21:46
    
For that virtual/abstract static members would be nice. see <dotnetrocks.com/text/0448/index9.html>; (search for "virtual static member") –  VolkerK Dec 3 '09 at 21:59
    
why not just make it NOT static? –  BlackTigerX Dec 3 '09 at 22:01
    
BlackTigerX, the value must be the same for each instance of ClassB - but different to ClassC's value –  ste Dec 3 '09 at 22:16
    
Using the Type within the base class dictionary will work. Thanks for the idea, I hadn't considered that as a way to make it work. –  enorl76 Feb 26 '13 at 4:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

While this works fine, I'm wondering if there's a more elegant or built-in way of doing this?

There isn't really a built-in way of doing this, as you're kind of violating basic OO principles here. Your base class should have no knowledge of subclasses in traditional object oriented theory.

That being said, if you must do this, your implementation is probably about as good as you're going to get, unless you can add some other info to the subclasses directly. If you need to control this, and you can't change subclasses, this will probably be your best approach.

share|improve this answer

What about this?



    class Base {
    protected static SomeObjectType myVariable;

    protected void doSomething()
    {
    Console.WriteLine( myVariable.SomeProperty );
    }
    }

    class AAA : Base
    {
    static AAA()
    {
    myVariable = new SomeObjectType();
    myVariable.SomeProperty = "A";
    }
    }

    class BBB : Base
    {
    static BBB()
    {
    myVariable = new SomeObjectType();
    myVariable.SomeProperty = "B";
    }
    }

It works for me. Would be even nicer with Interface.

share|improve this answer
    
Care to explain what is the code doing for benefit of others, a code dump with no explanation will not satisfy SO users :) –  t0mm13b Dec 12 '12 at 0:25
    
No, this would never work. Depending on when the VM sees the types, thats when the static constructor would be called, and hence 'myVariable' will contain the last-ran-static-constructor's value. And even worse, it'll be indeterminate who that last constructor will be. –  enorl76 Feb 26 '13 at 4:06

There's an alternative solution which might or might not be better than yours, depending on the use case:

abstract class ClassA
{
    private static class InternalClass<T> {
        public static string Value;
    }
    public string GetValue()
    {
        return (string)typeof(InternalClass<>)
              .MakeGenericType(GetType())
              .GetField("Value", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static)
              .GetValue(null);
    }
}

This approach is used in EqualityComparer<T>.Default. Of course, it's not used for this problem. You should really consider making GetValue abstract and override it in each derived class.

share|improve this answer
    
He mentioned that he can't override GetValue in each derived class... –  enorl76 Feb 26 '13 at 4:07
    
@enorl76 This question is very old so I don't recall the actual context, but I don't think this approach requires overriding GetValue. The final sentence of my answer is just a comment on the right approach, not part of the solution. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 26 '13 at 5:54

This is a little different than what you're asking for, but perhaps accomplishes the same thing.

    class Program
{
	static void Main(string[] args)
	{
		Console.WriteLine((new B()).theValue);
		Console.WriteLine((new C()).theValue);
		Console.ReadKey();
	}
}

public abstract class A
{
	public readonly string theValue;

	protected A(string s)
	{
		theValue = s;
	}
}

public class B : A
{
	public B(): base("Banana")
	{
	}
}

public class C : A
{
	public C(): base("Coconut")
	{
	}
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's the obvious + best way - unfortunately I can't alter classes B & C –  ste Dec 3 '09 at 22:17

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