Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I was wondering if you know about any good and accurate PHP library or file I can include in my script in order to analyse the content of X file and then check if it is an especific type like .doc, .docx .jpg, etc.

I know PHP offers a big number of libraries that we could use to check them, but they're not that accurate at all, some just checks the file extension or the file header (they don't even know if the file is broken or not)

What I request is for something very accurate, simple and faster (probably I'm requesting too much) but any link or suggestion will be accepted and appreciated, Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
For the level of accuracy that you want, you will probably need to use a full-blown library for each format, one that actually parses the file. It's always going to be slower than a header check though. Why is this necessary though - is a file header check not sufficient? Why not? –  Pekka 웃 Aug 25 '13 at 18:12
    
Pekka, what you said is right about use a different dedicated library for each format, but the header is not sufficient for me because let's say I have jpeg image I would like to analyse, the headers probably would be okay but the image itself is broken, and when I want to convert them or cut them for thumbnails (with the GD library which is the one I use) the functions (mostly imagecreatefromjpeg) will throw me errors, and in order to create a good thumbnail I need a valid image. Apart I would like to have it to prevent virus or code injection.. –  Neo Aug 25 '13 at 18:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I know, no such library exists; it also wouldn't make sense to have one.

let's say I have jpeg image I would like to analyse, the headers probably would be okay but the image itself is broken, and when I want to convert them or cut them for thumbnails (with the GD library which is the one I use) the functions (mostly imagecreatefromjpeg) will throw me errors, and in order to create a good thumbnail I need a valid image.

The best place to catch a malformed JPG file with malformed headers is when GD errors out while trying to process it. Just deal with that in a transparent and useful way (= let the user know that something went wrong). Why add extra code that would essentially have to do the same thing?

By handling the error when it occurs, you can also catch issues that a simple analysis of the file wouldn't reveal anyway - for example, GD can't deal with CMYK JPGs. Still, CMYK JPGs are perfectly valid files. Another example is files that are too big to be processed on your server.

Of course, you can do header or size checks beforehand on every uploaded file. But a separate check that goes as deeply as you want it doesn't make sense.

Apart I would like to have it to prevent virus or code injection..

This isn't a realistic goal. What if the library you open the file with to check it is vulnerable to the injection?

Also, injections like this are very rare; library vulnerabilities tend to be widely publicized, and patches quickly provided. Just keep your machine up to date.

If you really need enterprise-grade virus protection, get a server-side virus detection product.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I was catching the errors from imagecreatefromstring (apart imagecreatefromjpeg) and it's very difficult to handle the errors, firstable because that functions returns a boolean in case of failure but the error gets fired by the PHP compiler (shows the message) I added the @ operator to avoid it's visibility and sometimes throws errors with valid images too! and apart (and the big part of the headache) is that it also uses notices that could be like the "warnings" of PHP, it throws a notice instead of an error when the file is corrupt or not valid something that makes it hard to validate –  Neo Aug 25 '13 at 18:50
    
@Neo I realize this stuff is a pain in the arse, but it should all be fixable. imagecreatefromstring() will always return false if something goes wrong. That's basically the starting point. The warnings and notices can be caught, but maybe it's not necessary at all - if an image passes a header check (e.g. using getimagesize() ) and fails afterwards, then something is deeply wrong with it and there may be no need to tell the user exactly what is wrong. All the major image uploading services I know either accept the image, or say something like "something went wrong. Try another image" –  Pekka 웃 Aug 25 '13 at 18:54
    
Probably is my only way out, but I need to study the behaviour of that function, notices are fired even with the @ operator, I also get the error of "missing bytes" with valid images, I don't know why GD didn't design that function with a simple integer return reporting the state of the process.. –  Neo Aug 25 '13 at 18:55
1  
It's enough, and simple, I know but what I meant to say is that the function reports each error in a different way (Warnings, Notices, etc), but yeah, you're right, I'll try that, if the functions accepts it then it's valid, the only thing i just need is to handle the exceptions.. –  Neo Aug 25 '13 at 18:59
1  
Well Pekka, I guess this is it, thank you sooo much for your help, I will accept your answer and try what you suggest.. Greetings! :) –  Neo Aug 25 '13 at 19:04

What i did for this was to open the file, read it, and search for the file headers. most of them are available in their wikipedia format definition.

%PDF for pdf, first 4 chars. %PNG for png, first 4 chars.

Havent seen yet a library to do that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.