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Playing around with Lambdas I found an interesting behaviour that I do not fully understand.

Supose I have a struct Overload that derives from 2 template parameters, and has a using F1::operator(); clause.

Now if I derive from two functors I can only access the operator() of F1 (as I would expect)

If I derive from two Lambda Functions this is no longer true: I can access the operator() from F2 too.

#include <iostream>

// I compiled with g++ (GCC) 4.7.2 20121109 (Red Hat 4.7.2-8)
//
// g++ -Wall -std=c++11 -g main.cc
// g++ -Wall -std=c++11 -DFUNCTOR -g main.cc
// 
// or clang clang version 3.3 (tags/RELEASE_33/rc2)
// 
// clang++ -Wall -std=c++11 -g main.cc
// clang++ -Wall -std=c++11 -DFUNCTOR -g main.cc
// 
// on a Linux localhost.localdomain 3.9.6-200.fc18.i686 #1 SMP Thu Jun 13 
// 19:29:40 UTC 2013 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux box


struct Functor1
{
    void operator()() { std::cout << "Functor1::operator()()\n"; }
};

struct Functor2
{
    void operator()(int) { std::cout << "Functor2::operator()(int)\n"; }
};

template <typename F1, typename F2>
struct Overload : public F1, public F2
{
    Overload()
        : F1()
        , F2() {}

    Overload(F1 x1, F2 x2)
        : F1(x1)
        , F2(x2) {}

    using F1::operator(); 
};

template <typename F1, typename F2>
auto get(F1 x1, F2 x2) -> Overload<F1, F2>
{
   return Overload<F1, F2>(x1, x2);
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    auto f = get(Functor1(), Functor2());

    f();
#ifdef FUNCTOR
    f(2); // this one doesn't work IMHO correctly
#endif

    auto f1 = get(
                  []() { std::cout << "lambda1::operator()()\n"; },
                  [](int) { std::cout << "lambda2::operator()(int)\n"; }
                  );
    f1();
    f1(2); // this one works but I don't know why


  return 0;
}

The standard states that:

The type of the lambda-expression (which is also the type of the closure object) is a unique, unnamed non- union class type

So every Lambda's types should be unique.

I cannot explain why this is so: can anyone shed some light on this please?

share|improve this question
9  
Welcome to Stack Overflow, very nice question! –  Mat Aug 25 '13 at 19:12
    
Very much. We're a tough crowd and you just taught a lot of us a new thing. –  zneak Aug 25 '13 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted

In addition to operator(), a the class defined by a lambda can (under the right circumstances) provide a conversion to a pointer to function. The circumstance (or at least the primary one) is that the lambda can't capture anything.

If you add a capture:

auto f1 = get(
              []() { std::cout << "lambda1::operator()()\n"; },
              [i](int) { std::cout << "lambda2::operator()(int)\n"; }
              );
f1();
f1(2);

...the conversion to pointer to function is no longer provided, so trying to compile the code above gives the error you probably expected all along:

trash9.cpp: In function 'int main(int, char**)':
trash9.cpp:49:9: error: no match for call to '(Overload<main(int, char**)::<lambda()>, main(int, char**)::<lambda(int)> >) (int)'
trash9.cpp:14:8: note: candidate is:
trash9.cpp:45:23: note: main(int, char**)::<lambda()>
trash9.cpp:45:23: note:   candidate expects 0 arguments, 1 provided
share|improve this answer
    
Wait. Are you saying you can inherit from function pointer types? –  zneak Aug 25 '13 at 19:02
    
@zneak: No, not at all. You can inherit from a lambda because it defines a class, not a function. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 25 '13 at 19:03
    
struct Overload : public F1, public F2, with F1 and F2 deduced as function pointer types, according to your hypothesis, if I read it right. –  zneak Aug 25 '13 at 19:04
6  
@zneak: no - the lambdas have operator (function-pointer-type)() members in this case. These members are inherited and "visible" in the derived class. So f1(2) is "two-step" conversion to function pointer + function call. (If I got that right.) –  Mat Aug 25 '13 at 19:07
6  
@jrok: This answer is completely correct. The two calls to f1 in the OP's example are doing different things. One is calling the lambda's operator() (pulled in by the using clause). The other is calling a function pointer (the result of an implicit conversion). Jerry is pointing out that lambdas provide more than just operator() (like OP's Functor1 and Functor2); they also provide an implicit conversion to a function pointer when they are stateless. –  Nemo Aug 25 '13 at 19:13

A lambda generates a functor class.

Indeed, you can derive from lambdas and have polymorphic lambdas!

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    auto overload = make_overload(
        [](int i)          { return '[' + std::to_string(i) + ']'; },
        [](std::string s)  { return '[' + s + ']'; },
        []                 { return "[void]"; }
        );

    std::cout << overload(42)              << "\n";
    std::cout << overload("yay for c++11") << "\n";
    std::cout << overload()                << "\n";
}

Prints

[42]
[yay for c++11]
[void]

How?

template <typename... Fs>
   Overload<Fs...> make_overload(Fs&&... fs)
{
    return { std::forward<Fs>(fs)... };
}

Of course... this still hides the magic. It is the Overload class that 'magically' derives from all the lambdas and exposes the corresponding operator():

#include <functional>

template <typename... Fs> struct Overload;

template <typename F> struct Overload<F> {
    Overload(F&& f) : _f(std::forward<F>(f)) { }

    template <typename... Args>
    auto operator()(Args&&... args) const 
    -> decltype(std::declval<F>()(std::forward<Args>(args)...)) {
        return _f(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

  private:
    F _f;
};

template <typename F, typename... Fs>
   struct Overload<F, Fs...> : Overload<F>, Overload<Fs...>
{
    using Overload<F>::operator();
    using Overload<Fs...>::operator();

    Overload(F&& f, Fs&&... fs) :  
        Overload<F>(std::forward<F>(f)),
        Overload<Fs...>(std::forward<Fs>(fs)...)
    {
    }
};

template <typename... Fs>
   Overload<Fs...> make_overload(Fs&&... fs)
{
    return { std::forward<Fs>(fs)... };
}

See it Live on Coliru

share|improve this answer
8  
Although this is interesting, I do not see how it answers the question. –  Nemo Aug 25 '13 at 19:20
    
@Nemo ah. Apparently I misread the question slightly. Nevertheless, the code in my answer seems to contradict the claim by the OP that "If I derive from two Lambda Functions this is no longer true: I can access the operator() from F2 too". If you lose the using base::operator() line the code won't work anymore. I do suppose this is because I opted for chained inheritance, rather than multiple inheritance –  sehe Aug 25 '13 at 20:12

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