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Let's say I have 2 classes, classA and classB. Object A (of classA) contains some objects B (of classB). B objects have an event, and object A has subscribed a delegate which is executed when the event (of any of those B objects) is raised.

private void fooEventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
...
}

After doing something in fooEventHandler (which must be done inside A), I want to signal to the B object which has raised the event the outcome of what I've done in fooEventHandler. So I do the following:

private void fooEventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e)  
    {
    ...

        if (allOK)
           ((classB)sender).isOK();
        else
          ((classB) sender).isNotOK();
    }

So I'm actually using the sender to call a specific method on objectB after the event rising. I'm doing all this to avoid passing to objectB (in his constructor) some objectA members which from a design point of view shouldn't be in objectB. Is this a reasonable way to handle the issue? Is it common to use (object sender) in this way?

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2  
isNotOK(). Take a look at the CancelEventHandler delegate as an example. –  Hans Passant Aug 25 '13 at 18:46
    
Hmm..may you be a little more specific? I'm looking through CancelEventHandler but I don't understand what you mean... –  Carlo Arnaboldi Aug 25 '13 at 18:54
    
If it's your event, better define a handler that has classB as an argument instead of object –  Vadim Aug 25 '13 at 18:56
    
Nice suggestion Vadim, but doesn't Microsoft best practises suggest that each eventhandler method has a signature like (object sender someEventargs e)? Anyway, apart from that, my code is ok? Still wondering about what Hans Passant meant... –  Carlo Arnaboldi Aug 25 '13 at 20:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's a solution but i think is not the better way do it.

Here is another solution

Step 1 : - Create an inherit class of a EventArgs and add on it some properties that define the treatment to do in class B

For sample :

public class ClassBEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    bool treatmentIsOK = false;
}

Step 2 : In the same namespace of Class B create a new Delegate Event definition and use it to declare the event

For sample :

namespace ClassBNameSpace
{
   public delagate fooEventHandlerDelegate void (object sender, ClassBEventArgs e);

   public ClassB 
   {

   public event fooEventHandlerDelegate fooEventHandler;

   .........

Step3 : In ClassB raise the fooEventHandler Event with a ClassBEventArgs object. In ClassA event handler set the correct value of treatmentIsOK EventArgs. When the event callback from ClassA to ClassB, you can exploit the value of treatmentIsOK propertie

For Sample :

.......
if (this.fooEventHandler != null)
{
    ClassBEventArgs customEventArgs = new ClassBEventArgs();
     this.fooEventHandler (this,customEventArgs);
     if (customEventArgs.treatmentIsOK )
     {
        this.isOK();  ==> Your code
     }
     else
     {
        this.isOK();  ==> Your code
     }
}
.......
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This is what @Hans told in first comment of the question. It can be done easily with CancelEventArgs isn't it? Why not use CancelEventArgs –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 25 '13 at 19:44
    
Of course !! you can use it. My solution offers just the possibility to customize EventArgs more finely. –  tdelepine Aug 25 '13 at 19:50
    
Though your solution is correct. Why to reinvent the wheel? –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 25 '13 at 19:53
    
Just for future use. The CancelEventArgs it's a good solution –  tdelepine Aug 25 '13 at 19:56
    
Very well, I wasn't aware of the fact that you could check for the value of your custom eventArg members after rising the event. (I was already using a custom eventHandler, I didn't put it in the example because I thought it was just distracting from the subject at hand, clearly it was not). Thanks, I've just implemented your idea, I'll be able to really test it after some other parts will be written, still I'll flag this as a soluton, for now =) –  Carlo Arnaboldi Aug 26 '13 at 14:58

I think you make your A class too coupled with your B class. If all you need A to do after handling the event is call a certain callback - then pass the callback. This way, you could pass in lambda expressions for example, or pass methods of classes related to B or whatever.

So -

private void fooEventHandler(Action p_okCallback, Action p_notOkCallback)  
{
    ...

    if (allOK)
       p_okCallback();
    else
      p_notOkCallback();
}

or -

private void fooEventHandler(Action<bool> p_callback)  
{       
    ...

    p_callback(allOk);
}

If the event is not under your control, you could do like suggested by Helmer and Inherit from EventArgs. But again - I would pass in the callbacks, not the classes themselves.

Another option - if you feel like you'll need multiple methods and feel awkward passing a dozen callbacks around - consider passing an interface with exactly the methods you need.

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Why not create your own EventArgs class and put B in there?

Like:

public class ClassBEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public classB classBObject { get; set; }
}
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