Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My Spider Sense warns me that using eval() to parse incoming JSON is a bad idea. I'm just wondering if JSON.parse() - which I assume is a part of JavaScript and not a browser-specific function - is more secure.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 58 down vote accepted

You are more vulnerable to attacks if using eval: JSON is a subset of Javascript and json.parse just parses JSON whereas eval would leave the door open to all JS expressions.

share|improve this answer

Not all browsers have native JSON support so there will be times where you need to use eval() to the JSON string. Use JSON parser from http://json.org as that handles everything a lot easier for you.

Eval() is an evil but against some browsers its a necessary evil but where you can avoid it, do so!!!!!

share|improve this answer

All JSON.parse implementations most likely use eval()

JSON.parse is based on Douglas Crockford's solution, which uses eval() right there on line 469.

// In the third stage we use the eval function to compile the text into a
// JavaScript structure. The '{' operator is subject to a syntactic ambiguity
// in JavaScript: it can begin a block or an object literal. We wrap the text
// in parens to eliminate the ambiguity.

j = eval('(' + text + ')');

The advantage of JSON.parse is that it verifies the argument is correct JSON syntax.

share|improve this answer
33  
yeah, except that the line right before that verifies that it's a safe and valid string. –  nickf Apr 20 '10 at 22:56
2  
I tested JSON.parse() in Firefox 28 and Chromium 33 on my Linux Mint system. It was 2x as fast as eval() in Firefox and 4x as fast in Chromium. I'm not sure what source code you're posting, but they're not the same thing in my browsers. –  jbo5112 Apr 22 at 2:59

If you parse the JSON with eval, you're allowing the string being parsed to contain absolutely anything, so instead of just being a set of data, you could find yourself executing function calls, or whatever.

Also, JSON's parse accepts an aditional parameter, reviver, that lets you specify how to deal with certain values, such as datetimes (more info and example in the inline documentation here)

share|improve this answer

JSON is just a subset of JavaScript. But eval evaluates the full JavaScript language and not just the subset that’s JSON.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, I know that. Are you implying that JSON.parse() ONLY evaluates JSON and fails on all other incoming data? Or is it simply a wrapper for: var myObject = eval('(' + responseText + ')'); ?? –  Kevin Major Dec 3 '09 at 22:21
3  
@Kevin Major: Yes, the natively implemented JSON.parse (directly implemented into the JavaScript engine) parses only JSON. But other non-natively implementations use do some sanity checking and then use eval for performance reasons. –  Gumbo Dec 3 '09 at 22:33

There is a difference between what JSON.parse() and eval() will accept. Try eval on this:

var x = "{\"shoppingCartName\":\"shopping_cart:2000\"}"

eval(x)         //won't work
JSON.parse(x)   //does work

See this example.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.