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This question already has an answer here:

The following code doesn't work. What's wrong with this code? Compiler complains in the for loop that NumberList isn't a Iterable class.

What kind of class can be used in for-each loop? How to make NumberList iterable? I tried making NumberList implement Iterable, but it doesn't seem to work because I don't know how to define the Iterator properly.

If someone could demonstrate how to make this code work, or link me to a tutorial that'd be great.

public class Test{
    public class NumberList{
        private int numItems;
        private Number[] numbers;

        public NumberList(int size){
            this.numbers = new Number[size];
            this.numItems=0;
        }

        public void add(Number n){
            this.numbers[this.numItems++]=n;
        }
    }

    public void printPairs() {
        ArrayList<Integer> num=new ArrayList<Integer>();

        NumberList numbers = new NumberList(50);
        numbers.add(4);
        numbers.add(5);
        numbers.add(6);

        for(Number n1: numbers){
            System.out.println(n1);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Joshua Taylor, Narendra Pathai, Mena, T I, CoolBeans Sep 13 '13 at 19:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Why do you define your own list, and not using an ArrayList? – JB Nizet Aug 25 '13 at 21:38
    
First, definitely use the list that comes with the JDK. No use defining your own as the previous commenter said. But if you want to fix your code, the compiler gave you the answer. Just implement Iterable and fill out the required methods. – exabrial Aug 25 '13 at 21:45
    
There are other questions on SO about ways to implement Iterable, including Implementing the Iterable interface. – Joshua Taylor Aug 26 '13 at 20:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

NumberList does not implement Iterable. As far as the compiler is concerned its just any other class.

You need to do something like this

public class NumberList implements Iterable<Number> {

    private int numItems;
    private Number[] numbers;

    public NumberList(int size) {
        this.numbers = new Number[size];
        this.numItems = 0;
    }

    public void add(Number n) {
        this.numbers[this.numItems++] = n;
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<Number> iterator() {
        return Arrays.asList(numbers).subList(0, numItems).iterator();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Answer is fine, but illustrates the futility of this exercise: All you have is a thin delegation layer adding no value. – Bohemian Aug 26 '13 at 1:49
    
And the answer is not really fine, since the iterator iterates through all the elements of the array, and not just to the first numItems elements. – JB Nizet Aug 26 '13 at 7:51
1  
@JB You're right of course, updated answer. With these silly toy examples its easy to be lulled into a false sense that you cannot get it wrong. – monkjack Aug 26 '13 at 20:22

Your class NumberList need to implement the Iterable interface:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Iterator;

public class Test {
    public class NumberList implements Iterable<Number> {
        private int numItems;
        private Number[] numbers;

        public NumberList(int size) {
            this.numbers = new Number[size];
            this.numItems = 0;
        }

        public void add(Number n) {
            this.numbers[this.numItems++] = n;
        }

        @Override
        public Iterator<Number> iterator() {
            return Arrays.asList(numbers).iterator();
        }

    }

    public void printPairs() {

        ArrayList<Integer> num = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        NumberList numbers = new NumberList(50);
        numbers.add(4);
        numbers.add(5);
        numbers.add(6);

        for (Number n1 : numbers) {
            System.out.println(n1);
        }
    }
}    
share|improve this answer
    
I have a question, why is it that the "implements Iterable<Number>" requires a generic type? Why can't I just leave it as Iterable? In my compiler it seems that I can leave iterator method to be raw type, but needs to put <Number> as generic type in "Implement". – turtlesoup Aug 25 '13 at 22:12
3  
@Jimster if you implemented the raw Iterable rather than Iterable<Number> then you would only be able to say for(Object o : numbers), the compiler would reject for(Number n : numbers) – Ian Roberts Aug 25 '13 at 23:02
    
In general, even if the compiler will let you, it is never a good idea to leave anything as a raw type if there's any alternative. – Louis Wasserman Aug 26 '13 at 1:58

You need to implement the Iterable interface. In this case, that just means you need to add a method Iterator<T> iterator() to your NumberList class. Since your list only contains numbers in this case, the generic type parameter T is just Number.

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