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As suggested here, http://www.sitepoint.com/jquery-vs-raw-javascript-3-events-ajax/, is loading scripts at the bottom of a page just before the closing body tag a very reliable way of knowing that the DOM is ready?

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My understanding was that the benefit of loading scripts just before the closing </body> tag was to ensure the HTML/page rendering was completed before executing the scripts, so as to minimise the time it takes to display content to the user –  Alfie Aug 25 '13 at 23:22
    
No. Its best practice to add any script that relies on being available during dom using the onload event –  cgatian Aug 25 '13 at 23:22
    
Loading scripts at end of html is "perceived" performance. The script still will execute and lock the dom, the only difference is the visuals are available. –  cgatian Aug 25 '13 at 23:24
    
@cgatian sorry if I was unclear, but I think that is what I meant - it will mean that the user 'sees' a page as soon as possible, but not necessarily when the page has finished loading/executing all scripts –  Alfie Aug 25 '13 at 23:25
    
@Alfie yes you are right. –  cgatian Aug 25 '13 at 23:28
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1 Answer

To summarise comments above:

Loading scripts at the bottom of the page is not a reliable way of knowing that the DOM is ready. As suggested by @cgatian, using an onload or document.ready event is better for this.

The typical benefit of loading scripts just before the closing </body> tag is to ensure the HTML/page rendering is completed before executing the scripts, so as to minimise the time it takes to display content to the user: this means that the user 'sees' a page as soon as possible, but not necessarily when the page has finished loading/executing all scripts.

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onload is a very good candidate except for its obvious limitation of allowing only one listener per the event. onload in particular isn't executed until every asset has been loaded. A more efficient way will be to use the DOM Level 2 event model syntax to register listeners for the DOMContentLoaded event document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", init);. And by document.ready, are you referring to the jQuery $(document).ready() idiom? –  Rayreprise Aug 26 '13 at 0:26
    
I suppose it depends on your context, afaik DOMContentLoaded is only compatible with IE9+; if this isn't a problem, it sounds a good option, but with regards to your original question, deferring script loading is not equivalent to a 'dom loaded check'. And yes @ jquery/document.ready .. sorry for the lack of clarification there –  Alfie Aug 26 '13 at 0:30
    
Well grasped. The safest approach is to perform a dom ready check. Ughh...IE has always been a huge pain in the ass. –  Rayreprise Aug 26 '13 at 1:00
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