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I want a command that copies a form to the kill ring. In emacs-live, the closest thing I could find was this command / key-binding

(global-set-key (kbd "M-]") 'kill-ring-save)

However kill-ring-save has some wonky behaviour. Ii copies more than 1 form, past the cursor. Ultimately, I want a simple function along the lines of what's below (this doesn't quite work).

(defun copy-form () 
  (kill-ring-save (line-beginning-position) (live-paredit-forward))) 

(global-set-key (kbd "M-]") 'copy-form)

I've searched high and low ( SO question and Google search), but can't seem to find a simple, working command to copy a balanced expression. Has someone already done this?

Thanks

Tim

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Function sexp-at-point gives you the sexp ("form") at the cursor. Just copy that to the kill-ring, using kill-ring-save. E.g.:

(defun copy-sexp-at-point ()
  (interactive)
  (let ((bnds  (bounds-of-thing-at-point 'sexp)))
    (kill-ring-save (car bnds) (cdr bnds))))

Alternatively, just use kill-new:

(defun copy-sexp-at-point ()
  (interactive)
  (kill-new (thing-at-point 'sexp)))
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This looks really good. Except kill-ring-save expects this format (kill-ring-save BEG END). So I either need to i) use that or ii) use the another function that can save sexp-at-point results to the kill-ring. Any insights? –  Nutritioustim Aug 26 '13 at 12:10
    
So use (bounds-of-thing-at-point 'sexp) to get the BEG and END you need -- it returns (BEG . END), so pass the car and cdr to kill-ring-save. –  Drew Aug 26 '13 at 13:44
    
When I try that approach, emacs gives me the error Wrong type argument: symbolp, (one (two)). My code is online here. I should mention I'm an Emacs Lisp beginner. So I need very explicit explanations. Feel free to edit that code block, or do whatever's easiest. Thanks. –  Nutritioustim Aug 26 '13 at 15:46
    
Use the symbol sexp, not (sexp-at-point), as your arg to bounds-of-thing-at-point. –  Drew Aug 26 '13 at 16:39
    
Or just use kill-new. I've edited the answer to make it explicit for you. –  Drew Aug 26 '13 at 16:45
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The reason your copy-form cannot be bound to a key is that it is a function, not a command - it is missing an interactive form.

However, in your case you don't even need to write a new function.

Try a combination of

mark-sexp is an interactive compiled Lisp function in `lisp.el'.

It is bound to C-M-@, C-M-SPC.

and

M-w runs the command kill-ring-save, which is an interactive compiled Lisp function in `simple.el'.

It is bound to <C-insertchar>, M-w, <menu-bar> <edit> <copy>.

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When I use the command, emacs still gives the error: Wrong type argument: integer-or-marker-p, nil. I think it just has to do with kill-ring-save not getting back integers in the format (kill-ring-save BEG END). –  Nutritioustim Aug 26 '13 at 12:14
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I'm not sure I understand the question, but when I need to do what I consider as "copy a balanced form", I do: M-C-SPC M-w. If I want to cut it instead, I do M-C-SPC C-w.

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Here's what I generally use. Somehow it's more useful for me to kill the balanced expression instead of copying. If I want a copy instead, I first kill, then undo.

This function kills a string, if the point is inside string, otherwise the balanced expression, i.e. (),[],{},<> or whatever is defined by the syntax.

(defun kill-at-point ()
  "Kill the quoted string or the list that includes the point"
  (interactive)
  (let ((p (nth 8 (syntax-ppss))))
    (cond
      ;; string
      ((eq (char-after p) ?\")
       (goto-char p)
       (kill-sexp))
      ;; list
      ((ignore-errors (when (eq (char-after) ?\()
                        (forward-char))
                      (up-list)
                      t)
       (let ((beg (point)))
         (backward-list)
         (kill-region beg (point)))))))

I've also tried to add a special case for when the point is inside the comment, but I couldn't find a generic way to determine bounds of comment at point. If anyone knows, please tell me.

This other function can be relevant as well. It marks instead of killing, like the previous one. The nice thing that it extends the region each time it's called. I bind the first one to C-, and the second to C-M-,.

(defun mark-at-point ()
  "Mark the quoted string or the list that includes the point"
  (interactive)
  (let ((p (nth 8 (syntax-ppss))))
    (if (eq (char-after p) ?\")
    (progn
      (goto-char p)
          (set-mark (point))
      (forward-sexp))
      (progn
        (when (eq (char-after) 40)
          (forward-char))
        (condition-case nil
            (progn
              (up-list)
              (set-mark (point))
              (let ((beg (point)))
                (backward-list)
                (exchange-point-and-mark)))
          (error
           (when (looking-back "}")
             (exchange-point-and-mark)
             ;; assumes functions are separated by one empty line
             (re-search-backward "^[^A-Z-a-z]" nil t)
             (forward-char))))))))
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Heyya, thanks for responding. Killing the balanced expression, then undoing it, is what I currently do. So I wanted something beyond that. @Drew 's answer abouve, did the trick for me. I'm surprised it's not a standard thing in emacs / lisp. Anyways, thanks again. –  Nutritioustim Aug 26 '13 at 18:36
    
My function works differently than @Drews's. His approach gives an error when the point is on whitespace, or copies an symbol when on a symbol. My function kills the expression plus parens. Very useful for lisp/C++. –  abo-abo Aug 26 '13 at 18:43
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