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So I was playing around with the linked list in JS and came up with the following question:

Lets say, that we have an array and a linked list both with 5000 elements. We want to insert new element at index 10. The array way is pretty simple. We insert the new element at the given index and move the rest of the elements one index forward. So I tried doing this with linked list and end it up with the following:

Getting the implementation of linked list from Nicholas Zakas and adding additional method addOnPosition(data,index). At the end here is the code:

function LinkedList() {
this._head = null;
this._length = 0;
}

LinkedList.prototype = {

constructor: LinkedList,

add: function(data) {

    var node = {
            data: data,
            next: null
        },
        current;

    if (this._head === null) {
        this._head = node;
    }
    else {
        current = this._head;
        while (current.next) {
            current = current.next;
        }
        current.next = node;
    }
    this._length++;
},

remove: function(index) {

    if (index > -1 && index < this._length) {

        var current = this._head,
            previous,
            i = 0;


        if (index === 0) {
            this._head = current.next;
        }
        else {
            while (i++ < index) {
                previous = current;
                current = current.next;
            }
            previous.next = current.next;
        }

        this._length--;
        return current.data;
    }
    else {
        return null;
    }
},

item: function(index) {

    var current = this._head,
        i = 0;

    if (index > - 1 && index < this._length) {

        while (i++ < index) {
            current = current.next;
        }
        return current.data;

    }
    else {
        return null;
    }
},

addOnPosition: function(data,index) {

    if (index > -1 && index <= this._length) {
        var node = {
                data: data,
                next: null
            },
            current = this._head,
            i = 0,
            temp,
            previous;

        if (this._head === null) {
            this._head = node;
        }
        else {
            if (index === 0) {
                this._head = node;
                node.next = current;
            }
            else {
                while (i++ < index) {
                    previous = current;
                    current = current.next;
                }
                previous.next = node;
                node.next = current;
            }
        }
        this._length++;
    }
    else {
        return null;
    }
},

toArray: function() {
    var result = [],
        current = this._head;

    while (current) {
        result.push(current.data);
        current = current.next;
    }
    return result;
},
toString: function() {
    return this.toArray().toString();
}
}

At the end, my question is: Is this method faster than doing all this with array and if it is, what is the complexity for both? And probably the more important, did I missed something with the adOnPosition method implementation?

share|improve this question
1  
Why didn't you use the item method to select the index in addOnPosition (seems like you're repeating yourself)? This could be faster for large lists, why don't you write a test on jsperf.com? –  RoryKoehein Aug 26 '13 at 10:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_array#Performance for complexity of LinkedList and ArrayList data structures. For funzies, also check out When to use LinkedList<> over ArrayList<>?


Inserting after a node in a singly-linked list is a constant-time operation. If you have a node in a doubly-linked list, inserting before it is also a constant-time operation.

However, your addOnPosition function runs down the linked list 'index' times; that is, you jump from one node to the next that many times. As such, your algorithm's complexity is basically O(index) - we'd write that as O(n).

To explain my point: If you wish to insert a node at the 0th element, your operation basically runs at constant time; you get the this._front node and you're done. To insert to the end of your linear, singly-linked list, you must iterate down to the end of the list, performing more "jumps" from one node to the next. You can use circular linked lists to optimize this case.

As for performing a similar insertion with an arraylist, insertion complexity is basically O(length - index) as length-index elements must be shifted down the array, we write this as O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
Great! Thanks for the links :) –  sla55er Aug 26 '13 at 16:31

Actually insertion into the middle of a linked list is O(n) time complexity, meaning the time it will take on average or in the worst case is proportional to the number of elements already in the list (i.e. n). "O(index)" is not even a real time complexity.

The time complexity for inserting into the middle of an array is also O(n). "O(length - index)" is also not a real time complexity. The number of operations involved in shifting elements in the list in the average or worst case is going to be proportional to the number of items in the list (i.e. n).

The advantage to a linked list over an array is that prepending/appending elements to the front/back of the list is O(1) time complexity, but O(n) for an array.

The advantage of an array over a linked list is that retrieving an element from an array by it's index is O(1), but O(n) for a linked list.

The simplest way to decide between a linked list and an array, is to determine if you need fast appending/prepending or fast index based retrieval of data. If you need both, then there are some variations on these data structures that provide good performance/compromises in both areas.

share|improve this answer
1  
Additionally, the list is O(1) if you want to insert at a known insertion point. –  Lukas Bünger Jan 28 '14 at 15:54
    
Appending to an array is definitely not O(n). Let's say when you run out of space you move the array to a new location with 10 spaces more, then it is O(n/10) because only 1 appending out of 10 will be O(n). When you initialize the array with the proper size at the beginning, it will always be O(1). Prepending or inserting is always O(n) though. –  Johnride Nov 4 '14 at 3:52

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