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For a client side search tool I need to find the Levenshtein distance of a word with millions of other words. A user should be able to compare a short text of about twenty words with a book. The user could do this by finding locations of the most characterizing words of the text in the book. 'Finding locations'does not mean looking for an exact match but nearly match as with levenshtein. I started with already available implementations but I needed more speed. I ended up with this:

var rowA = new Uint16Array(1e6);
var rowB = new Uint16Array(1e6);
function levenshtein(s1, s2) {
    var s1_len = s1.length, s2_len = s2.length, i1, i2 = 0, a, b, c, c2, i = 0;
    if (s1_len === 0)
        return s2_len;
    if (s2_len === 0)
        return s1_len;
    while (i < s1_len)
        rowA[i] = ++i;
    while (i2 < s2_len) {
        c2 = s2[i2];
        a = i2;
        ++i2;
        b = i2;
        for (i1 = 0; i1 < s1_len; ++i1) {
            c = a + (s1[i1] !== c2 );
            a = rowA[i1];
            b = b < a ? (b < c ? b + 1 : c) : (a < c ? a + 1 : c);
            rowB[i1] = b;
        }
        if (i2 === s2_len)
            return b;
        c2 = s2[i2];
        a = i2;
        ++i2;
        b = i2;
        for (i1 = 0; i1 < s1_len; ++i1) {
            c = a + (s1[i1] !== c2 );
            a = rowB[i1];
            b = b < a ? (b < c ? b + 1 : c) : (a < c ? a + 1 : c);
            rowA[i1] = b;
        }
    }
    return b;
}

As you see I used techniques like placing the objects out of the function in order to re use them. I also repeated myself a bit by linearizing the loop somewhat. Could it be faster? I am curious of your advice.

Update: After tips from Bergi and some more thinking I came to this solution:

    var row = new Uint16Array(1e6);
    function levenshtein(s1, s2) {
        var s1_len = s1.length, s2_len = s2.length, i2 = 1, a, b = 0, c, c2, i1 = 0;
        if (s1_len === 0)
            return s2_len;
        if (s2_len === 0)
            return s1_len;
        c2 = s2[0];
        if (s1[0] === c2) {
            while (i1 < s1_len) {
                row[i1] = i1++;
            }
            b = s1_len - 1;
        } else {
            row[0] = 1;
            ++b;
            if (s1_len > 1)
                for (i1 = 1; i1 < s1_len; ++i1) {
                    if (s1[i1] === c2) {
                        row[i1] = b;
                        for (++i1; i1 < s1_len; ++i1) {
                            row[i1] = ++b;
                        }
                    } else {
                        row[i1] = ++b;
                    }
                }
        }
        if (s2_len > 1)
            while (i2 < s2_len) {
                c2 = s2[i2];
                c = i2 + (s1[0] !== c2);
                a = row[0];
                ++i2;
                b = i2 < a ? (i2 < c ? i2 + 1 : c) : (a < c ? a + 1 : c);
                row[0] = b;
                if (s1_len > 1) {
                    for (i1 = 1; i1 < s1_len; ++i1) {
                        c = a + (s1[i1] !== c2);
                        a = row[i1];
                        b = b < a ? (b < c ? b + 1 : c) : (a < c ? a + 1 : c);
                        row[i1] = b;
                    }
                }
            }
        return b;
    }

This is again much faster. I cannot squeeze more out of it. I keep looking for other ideas and will try some more.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Renan, Jonas G. Drange, Vatine, rink.attendant.6, Lennart Regebro Aug 27 '13 at 12:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Are you familiar with this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/11919065/… ? – Jan.J Aug 26 '13 at 10:17
    
Yes I am, but levDist('knowledge','configured') gives me 8 while I expected 9. So I am not sure about it. – Marco de Wit Aug 26 '13 at 10:47
    
@MarcodeWit: The comments on the accepted answer explain that the code there does Damerau-Levensthein, which gives 8 for your words. – Bergi Aug 26 '13 at 10:56
    
@Bergi After deleting the Damerau transposition my algorithm is over six times as fast on Firefox. Mainly because of caching I suppose. – Marco de Wit Aug 26 '13 at 11:14
    
While I don't know how to make the algorithm itself faster I suggest you to try parallelize the task by using Web Workers. They sound like a ideal solution for your problem and will avoid freezing the UI. – Cesar Canassa Aug 26 '13 at 12:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you are comparing against the same word over and over, you can get a little performance improvement by using partial application and caching there:

function levenshtein(s1) {
    var row0 = [], row1 = [], s1_len = s1.length;
    if (s1_len === 0)
        return function(s2) {
            return s2.length;
        };
    return function(s2) {
        var s2_len = s2.length, s1_idx, s2_idx = 0, a, b, c, c2, i = 0;
        if (s2_len === 0)
            return s1_len;
        …
        return b;
    };
}

I also repeated myself a bit by linearizing the loop somewhat.

Not sure whether it gets lot faster, but you can omit one of the arrays - you do not need to read/write them in an alternating manner:

function levenshtein(s1) {
    var s1_len = s1.length, row = new Array(s1_len);
    if (s1_len === 0)
        return function(s2) {
            return s2.length;
        };
    return function(s2) {
        var s2_len = s2.length, s1_idx, s2_idx = 0, a, b, c, c2, i = 0;
        if (s2_len === 0)
            return s1_len;
        while (i < s1_len)
           row[i] = ++i;
        while (s2_idx < s2_len) {
            c2 = s2[s2_idx];
            a = s2_idx;
            ++s2_idx;
            b = s2_idx;
            for (s1_idx = 0; s1_idx < s1_len; ++s1_idx) {
                c = a + (s1[s1_idx] === c2 ? 0 : 1);
                a = row[s1_idx];
                b = b < a ? (b < c ? b + 1 : c) : (a < c ? a + 1 : c);
                row[s1_idx] = b;
            }
        }
        return b;
    };
}

I don't think further optimisations can be made without putting your millions of words in a dedicated data structure (e.g. a prefix trie).

share|improve this answer
    
Omitting one of the arrays was quite obvious. Strange I did not see it myself. – Marco de Wit Aug 26 '13 at 13:10
    
At first I had expected to need some additional code for accessing the previous-row overwritten value as well, before I noticed that it's already cached in a :-) If you need further optimisations, please tell us about the format of the million words, what exactly you are searching (sorting?) in them and what s1 values you are expecting – Bergi Aug 26 '13 at 14:05
1  
@MarcodeWit "putting your millions of words in a dedicated data structure (e.g. a prefix trie)" This is a huge win. – David Eisenstat Aug 26 '13 at 15:03
    
@bergi A user should be able to compare a short text of about twenty words with a book. The user could do this by finding locations of the most characterizing words of the text in the book. 'Finding locations'does not mean looking for an exact match but nearly match as with levenshtein. – Marco de Wit Aug 26 '13 at 15:10
    
@MarcodeWit: Oops, "finding words" is a little different task. Have you read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Approximate_string_matching already? – Bergi Aug 26 '13 at 15:56

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