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I have a small problem here on my register and/or login page. I can register, but I cannot login using the newly registered account. May I please ask for your advice guys?

execAddEmp.php

<?php
include ("./db_connect.php");
include ("./functions.php");

if(isset($_POST['email'], $_POST['username'], $_POST['status'])) { 

$username = $_POST['username'];
$firstname = $_POST['firstname'];
$lastname = $_POST['lastname'];
$mi = $_POST['mi'];
$email = $_POST['email'];
$status = $_POST['status'];

if($result = mysqli_query($mysqli, "SELECT * FROM employee WHERE email='$email'")){
$row_count = mysqli_num_rows($result);
//Now display errors

print ("Email is already in use!<br>");

}
$password = $_POST['password']; 
$random_salt = hash('sha512', uniqid(mt_rand(1, mt_getrandmax()), true));
$password = hash('sha512', $password.$random_salt);
print $password;
if ($insert_stmt = $mysqli->prepare("INSERT INTO members (username, firstname, lastname, MI, status, email, password, salt) VALUES (?, ?, ?, ?,?,?,?,?)")) { $insert_stmt->bind_param('ssssssss', $username, $firstname, $lastname, $mi, $status, $email, $password, $random_salt); 
// Execute the prepared query. 
$insert_stmt->execute();
}
if(!$insert_stmt){

die("There's little problem: ".mysqli_error($mysqli));

}

include("loading.php");
echo '<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1;url=addemployee.php">';
//echo "<a href='adddivisions.php'>back</a>";

}
  else{
     echo 'Invalid Request';}

?>

Functions.php

<?php
function sec_session_start() {
        $session_name = 'sec_session_id'; // Set a custom session name
        $secure = false; // Set to true if using https.
        $httponly = true; // This stops javascript being able to access the session id. 

        ini_set('session.use_only_cookies', 1); // Forces sessions to only use cookies. 
        $cookieParams = session_get_cookie_params(); // Gets current cookies params.
        session_set_cookie_params($cookieParams["lifetime"], $cookieParams["path"], $cookieParams["domain"], $secure, $httponly); 
        session_name($session_name); // Sets the session name to the one set above.
        session_start(); // Start the php session
        session_regenerate_id(); // regenerated the session, delete the old one.  
}

function login($email, $password, $mysqli) {
   // Using prepared Statements means that SQL injection is not possible. 
   if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT id, username, password, salt FROM members WHERE email = ? LIMIT 1")) { 
      $stmt->bind_param('s', $email); // Bind "$email" to parameter.
      $stmt->execute(); // Execute the prepared query.
      $stmt->store_result();
      $stmt->bind_result($user_id, $username, $db_password, $salt); // get variables from result.
      $stmt->fetch();
      $password = hash('sha512', $password.$salt); // hash the password with the unique salt.


      if($stmt->num_rows == 1) { // If the user exists
         // We check if the account is locked from too many login attempts
         if(checkbrute($user_id, $mysqli) == true) { 
            // Account is locked
            // Send an email to user saying their account is locked
            return false;
         } else {
         if($db_password == $password) { // Check if the password in the database matches the password the user submitted. 
            // Password is correct!
            echo $password;


               $user_browser = $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']; // Get the user-agent string of the user.

               $user_id = preg_replace("/[^0-9]+/", "", $user_id); // XSS protection as we might print this value
               $_SESSION['user_id'] = $user_id; 
               $username = preg_replace("/[^a-zA-Z0-9_\-]+/", "", $username); // XSS protection as we might print this value
               $_SESSION['username'] = $username;
               $_SESSION['login_string'] = hash('sha512', $password.$user_browser);
               // Login successful.
               return true;    
         } else {
            // Password is not correct
            // We record this attempt in the database
            $now = time();
            $mysqli->query("INSERT INTO login_attempts (user_id, time) VALUES ('$user_id', '$now')");
            return false;
         }
      }
      } else {
         // No user exists.  
         return false;
      }
   }
}

function checkbrute($user_id, $mysqli) {
   // Get timestamp of current time
   $now = time();
   // All login attempts are counted from the past 2 hours. 
   $valid_attempts = $now - (2 * 60 * 60); 

   if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT time FROM login_attempts WHERE user_id = ? AND time > '$valid_attempts'")) { 
      $stmt->bind_param('i', $user_id); 
      // Execute the prepared query.
      $stmt->execute();
      $stmt->store_result();
      // If there has been more than 5 failed logins
      if($stmt->num_rows > 5) {
         return true;
      } else {
         return false;
      }
   }
}

 function login_check($mysqli) {
   // Check if all session variables are set
   if(isset($_SESSION['user_id'], $_SESSION['username'], $_SESSION['login_string'])) {
     $user_id = $_SESSION['user_id'];
     $login_string = $_SESSION['login_string'];
     $username = $_SESSION['username'];

     $user_browser = $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']; // Get the user-agent string of the user.

     if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT password FROM members WHERE id = ? LIMIT 1")) { 
        $stmt->bind_param('i', $user_id); // Bind "$user_id" to parameter.
        $stmt->execute(); // Execute the prepared query.
        $stmt->store_result();

        if($stmt->num_rows == 1) { // If the user exists
           $stmt->bind_result($password); // get variables from result.
           $stmt->fetch();
           $login_check = hash('sha512', $password.$user_browser);
           if($login_check == $login_string) {
              // Logged In!!!!
              return true;
           } else {
              // Not logged in
              return false;
           }
        } else {
            // Not logged in
            return false;
        }
     } else {
        // Not logged in
        return false;
     }
   } else {
     // Not logged in
     return false;
   }
}

?>

Forms.js

function formhash(form, password) {
   // Create a new element input, this will be out hashed password field.
   var p = document.createElement("input");
   // Add the new element to our form.
   form.appendChild(p);
   p.name = "p";
   p.type = "hidden"
   p.value = hex_sha512(password.value);
   // Make sure the plaintext password doesn't get sent.
   password.value = "";
   // Finally submit the form.
   form.submit();

}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by NikiC, HamZa, tereško, Damien Overeem, Chris Sep 13 '13 at 19:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It looks like you are already sending a hash from js to your PHP script, so there is no need to hash it again in the login function. But there is also some problem with the salt it seems. Try to get rid of the javascript hash and try if it works then. –  schoash Aug 26 '13 at 12:26
    
In your login function , from where you get $salt value ? –  Charaf jra Aug 26 '13 at 12:28
    
@FaceOfJock: from the query. $stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT id, username, password, salt FROM members WHERE email = ? LIMIT 1"); $stmt->bind_result($user_id, $username, $db_password, $salt); –  JimL Aug 26 '13 at 12:30
    
Looks like the guide from here Seems to have forgotten to use the sha512.js file. Which as schoash said it could be done without it...as mentioned in the article that was done as to not send a plain/text version of the password (but then again what's the difference, it just becomes a longer password...) the js then would always be required... SSL would be the better option for this in either case as was also mentioned in the article. Looks like it is but really isn't secure. –  CrandellWS Apr 17 at 4:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

SHA512 is a hash algoritm, not encryption. I know this answer might be considered off topic, but you should really use the default PHP password class instead. Since you're probably not on PHP 5.5 yet you can use this: https://gist.github.com/marcoarment/1053158

Usage example:

// In a registration or password-change form:
$hash_for_user = Bcrypt::hash($_POST['password']);

// In a login form:
$is_correct = Bcrypt::check($_POST['password'], $stored_hash_for_user);
share|improve this answer
    
I'll try using bcrypt now. Judging from the usage example, I guess it's easy to use. Thank you. –  user2717993 Aug 26 '13 at 12:40
1  
If you are on php 5 >= 5.5 you can stick with password_hash and password_verify that gives you the option to use the hash algorithm you prefer (even bcrypt) plus some other options like salt, cost etc. Please refer to the PHP doc here and here –  Antonio E. Aug 26 '13 at 12:42
    
@AntonioE.: As I said in my answer I wrote assuming he wasn't yet on PHP 5.5, how many production enviroments are? (hopefully none) –  JimL Aug 26 '13 at 12:44
    
you are right :) –  Antonio E. Aug 26 '13 at 12:46

The funny thing is that your question is about Security but your code has multiple loopholes.

There is no validation what so ever on the input parameters (you simply paste the $_POST['email'] into a query (the SELECT one).

Then you talk about encryption, but actually mean hashing. SHA512 is not a food hash for storing passwords. The entire sha-family is bad for storing passwords. If you really want to have a strong way of hashing your passwords use Bcrypt or pkbdf2 with the built in hashing algo's in php as JimL allready suggested

You are using a Salt, good. But the way you calculate the hash... Don't use mt_rand. This function is time-based use mcrypt_create_iv and on't hash it, the hashing will only slow it down but won't add more security.

Hashing on client side will not make your application safer. It will simply tell everyone how ou are hashing your passwords. If you want the data to be encrypted when sent, use ssl.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for introducing me to bycrypt. Will try to use it now. –  user2717993 Aug 26 '13 at 12:38
    
True, in some cases there is plausible reason to hash passwords client side (too). I do this for a couple of projects atm, where I sha512 the password before sending it (over SSL), and then Bcrypt it before storing to DB. Simply because the user story demands that no passwords ever touch the server in plain text form. –  JimL Aug 26 '13 at 12:39
    
When hashing a hash with a different hash you actually diminish security... sha512 always returns the same length. So Bcrypt will always hash a string of the same length. This makes cracking it soooo much easier... –  Pinoniq Aug 26 '13 at 12:46
    
@Pinoniq: good luck, it's nowhere near plausible to crack Bcrypt anyway. And, since Bcrypt only handles the first 72 chars of the password you can change to use more bits pr char on the submitted sha512 hash and get a shorter string (fitting Bcrypt) with higher entropy :) –  JimL Aug 26 '13 at 12:51
    
When you know the length of a password, brute force cracking becomes a lot easier. Not only Bcrypt but also the ssl. Since you know the length of the password field (sha512) –  Pinoniq Aug 26 '13 at 12:56

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