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I'm just getting back into C++ after a 10 year absence and so decided to try and program an ASCII BlackJack game. I decided to use a vector to hold both the deck and the players hand but am finding that when I call the initial deal function which should assign 2 cards to both the DEALER vector hand and PLAYER vector hand, it writes the cards just fine but when it comes out and later on I want to print the hand, i get an out of bounds exception.

Code snippets below!

void deck::initialDeal(player dealer, player player1)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 2 ; i++)
    {
        dealer.addHand(myDeck[i]);
        myDeck.erase(myDeck.begin());
        player1.addHand(myDeck[i]);
        myDeck.erase(myDeck.begin());
    }
}

The above just takes a couple of cards from my main deck and calls the addHand routine to add the card to the players vector hand:

void player::addHand(card dealtCard)
{
    hand.push_back(dealtCard);
}

If I put in a routine to output the hand vector inside the addHand function, it works fine and shows that data was put in.

However, later on I want to print the hand to the screen and so have another function called printHand()

void player::printHand()
{
    if (dealer == true)
    {
        cout << hand[0].getNumber() << hand[0].getSuit() << " ";
        cout << hand.size() << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        for(std::vector<card>::size_type x = 0 ; x != hand.size() ; x++)
        {
            cout << hand[x].getNumber() << hand[x].getSuit() << " ";
        }
    }
}

At the moment I am just dealing with the Dealer side, so it goes into the dealer branch of the function and thats when I get the error.

I have the feeling that I should maybe have used pointers here because the data created in the addHand() function gets deleted once its done?

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1 Answer 1

You seem to pass all arguments by copy, and not by reference (and by reference I do not mean pointers). This means you are only modifying the copies and not the originals.

If you modify the function prototype like this:

void initialDeal(player& dealer, player& player1)

the arguments are passed by reference instead, and allows you to modify the original objects being passed as arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah I knew it was something to do with the scope like that. Thanks buddy! Much appreciated! I'll give it a go. –  user2718166 Aug 26 '13 at 13:16
    
Worked a treat and a half - thanks Joachim! –  user2718166 Aug 26 '13 at 13:20
2  
@user2718166: Note that functions that modify their arguments generally make the code difficult to maintain, because you need to think a lot about what is modified where. I'd recommend wrapping the vectors in a class and using properly named methods to modify it. –  Jan Hudec Aug 26 '13 at 13:23

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