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I am short on funds and can only afford one. I am a total novice.

Thanks in advance for any help.

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closed as not constructive by Jeremy Banks, Ken Redler, Bill the Lizard Mar 14 '12 at 17:36

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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If your really hard up for cash then you can get just the electronic copy of Terence Parr's excellent book on Antlr from the pragmatic programmers. I ordered both the PDF and paper copy when it was announced.

One word of caution though is that the book covers v3 of ANTLR. I use v2 at work as it has better C++ support.

http://pragprog.com/titles/tpantlr/the-definitive-antlr-reference

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If money is a true problem, any that your local library has.

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Public libraries are a vastly underutilized resource. –  Todd Stout Jan 4 '11 at 2:37
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FWIW, this is a free article written by a colleague of mine. Parr has linked to it from his website. It may not replace a book but it is a solid introduction.

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Based on this SO post, looks like this books is best.

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Parr's ANTLR book is the definitive source but is not easy going for a "total novice." For a total novice, you're going to be better off studying the ANTLR wiki for tutorials and examples that are close to your problem, and see if you can derive from them.

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Sadly, Terence Parr's The Definitive Antlr Reference: Building Domain-Specific Languages (Pragmatic Programmers) is the best there is. I've rarely had to deal with a book so poorly laid out as this (making it a terrible reference), but ANTLR is so good that it's worth it to me to deal with the poor documentation problems and lack of any good book on the subject.

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" I've rarely had to deal with a book so poorly laid out as this " - You can get a way with a lot if your title is prof. it seems. –  ndroock1 Jan 20 '12 at 18:58
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