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i have a problem with my RemoveMid function in my linked list.. the code seems ok and there's no syntax error, but when i call this function, the program stops working.. i think there's something wrong with the logic of the function. i hope you may help me to correct it. this is the implementation of the RemoveMid function

template<typename T>
bool LinkedList<T>::RemoveMid(T& target)
{
    Node<T> *current = new Node<T>;
    bool found = false;
    current = start;
    while(current != NULL && !found)
    {
        if(current->next->info == target)
            found = true;
        if(!found)
            current = current->next;
    }
    if(found)
    {
        Node<T> *Ptr;
        Ptr = current->next;
        current = current->next;
        delete Ptr;
        return true;
    }
    else
        cout<<"target not found\n";

}
share|improve this question
2  
The description of the function seems to imply that you want to remove something: why are you allocating a new node? Especially, as you are dropping the allocated memory on the ground rather fast creating a memory leak. – Dietmar Kühl Aug 26 '13 at 14:33
    
Have you stepped through your test case with a debugger? – Adam Burry Aug 26 '13 at 14:35
    
It looks as if you want to use the old trick of maintaining a pointer to the pointer to the element so you can deal with both the pointer to the head and a pointer to the next node. In that case you need to use &start and to update it you'd use &current->next. – Dietmar Kühl Aug 26 '13 at 14:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm guessing this is a Singly Linked List (that is, it only goes forward) since you do not have a Previous pointer. With that in mind:

template<typename T> bool LinkedList<T>::Remove(T& target) // name changed as removing from anywhere in a linked list is effectively the same
{
    Node<T>* current = start; // your allocation caused a memory leak here
    Node<T>* previous = NULL;
    bool found = false;
    while(current != NULL)
    {
        if (current->info == target) // you should be looking at the current node, not the next node
        {
            found = true;
            break;
        }

        previous = current;
        current = current->next;
    }

    if (found)
    {
        if (previous == NULL)  // deleting head node
        {
            start = current->next;
        }
        else
        {
            previous->next = current->next;
        }

        delete current;
    }
    else
    {
        cout<<"target not found\n";
    }

    return found;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A lot of useless lines here. Found for example. If nothing is found current->next will give NULL. You should use that to your advantage. Look at my code below to see what I mean. Also there is no need to play around with previous current->next->next is a trick that works best with linked lists. :) – Void Aug 26 '13 at 14:57
    
@Void: I left his code largely in tact (hence a lot of lines I would not use otherwise). current->next->next is not a "trick", it is a logical fallacy. If you are checking current, you cannot assume that current->next is non-NULL. – Zac Howland Aug 26 '13 at 15:06
    
The code is wrong! If the first element is being deleted, the list is left in an inconsistent state because the start now points to a deleted node! (actually, it also dereferences previous which is null if the found element is the first element) The way to fix the problem is in my comment above: do not use pointer to the node but use a pointer to the pointer of the node. Otherwise you need special treatment for deleting the first node. – Dietmar Kühl Aug 26 '13 at 15:08
    
@Deitmar: Updated to be more complete. And having a pointer to a pointer to a pointer is rather overkill, especially when you still need to handle the head node slightly different. – Zac Howland Aug 26 '13 at 15:19
    
@ZacHowland: That's the point: You don't need to treat is separately when you do as I see (see my response). – Dietmar Kühl Aug 26 '13 at 15:23

Here is properly working version (I think; I haven't tested it, though, and in my experience untested software is buggy) which seems to resemble the original intent (i.e., no special case when removing the first element):

template<typename T>
bool LinkedList<T>::RemoveMid(T const& target)
{
    for (Node<T> **current(&this->start); *current; current = &(*current)->next) {
        if ((*current)->info == target) {
            std::auto_ptr<Node<T>> tmp(*current);
            *current = (*current)->next;
            return true;
        }
    }
    std::cout<<"target not found\n";
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Bare in mind that this is almost certainly a homework assignment meant to convey the needed operations of a linked list. Though this is clever. – Zac Howland Aug 26 '13 at 15:38

There are quite a few probs with this code:

  1. You're checking the next node in your linked list here if(current->next->info == target) this will miss your start node.
  2. You assign new Node<T> to your current pointer and then reassigning start to it two lines latter.
  3. You then incorrectly delete the next node to the one you found with Ptr = current->next; followed two lines later with delete Ptr.
  4. In between those lines you assign to the node you wanted to remove a pointer to the node you are about to delete!

There're probably more errors but fixing all these is a good start.

share|improve this answer

I think there are several places I don't understand

      Node<T> *current = new Node<T>;

Why you want to allocate a new Node to current since current will be assigned to start anyway?

Secondly,

    if(current->next->info == target)
        found = true;

Why you use current->next instead of current? And current->next could be NULL which makes current->next->info invalid.

BTW, why don't you use the linked list provided by STL?

share|improve this answer
    
The answer to that last question is likely because it is a homework assignment. – Zac Howland Aug 26 '13 at 14:50
    
current->next->info cant be invalid because of "while(current != NULL)" – Void Aug 26 '13 at 14:59
    
@Void: current->next can be invalid when current is non-NULL. If current is the last item in the list, next points to null, therefore there is no next->info. – Zac Howland Aug 26 '13 at 15:05

Regarding your error: this assignment current = current->next; should be current->next = current->next->next; Because if you delete the node that is after your current node you want your current node (current->next) to point at the node that is after the one you delete (current->next->next)

Also there might be some problem with the code. First of all current->next->info will crash your program if the Node is still not found and current->next is NULL (current points to the last element), obviously in this case current->next->info would be illegal. Also you might concerning adding return false; after the cout

share|improve this answer

Here is a better version of your code. Less variables and all. Try it and see if it works now. :)

template<typename T>
bool LinkedList<T>::RemoveMid(T& target)
{
    Node<T> *current = new Node<T>;
    current = start;
    while(current != NULL)
    {
        if(current->next->info == target)
            break; //stops while loop = faster since the whole list doesnt have to be parsed once we found the target

        current = current->next;
    }

    if(current!=NULL)
    {
        current->next = current->next->next; //we "unlinked" target from the list and linked the rest of list instead
        return true;
    }
    else
        cout<<"target not found\n";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You are allocating a new node in your first line (memory leak). You are also skipping the first item entirely. Finally, if current is the last item in the list, current->next is null, and thus, current->next->next won't work. – Zac Howland Aug 26 '13 at 15:04

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