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I'm going to include() a php file in a wordpress theme file. The file is header.php, and the function is like:

<?php
error_reporting(E_ALL);
$filename = "path/to/file.php";
if (file_exists($filename)){
echo 'Ok';
include($filename);
} ?>

"Ok" is printed in resulting html, but output stops immediately after. I used both a relative and an absolute path with the same result. Am I missing something about home themes work?

File permissions are ok.

EDIT: display_errors is set off in wordpress. I had to enable it to find the error and resolve. It was a FATAL.

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Fatal error: Call to a member function function_name() on a non-object in /path/to/file.php on line # It took me a while to find it: display_error was set off in wordpress. Thank you, @Zaffy –  Thundar Aug 29 '13 at 14:23
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4 Answers

$filename = "file.php"; // First of all that needs to be quoted

// then its $filename, not filename. Missing $ before variable name

if (file_exists($filename)){  
echo 'Ok';
include($filename);
}
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My fault. Development code was already ok about this two things. I'm editing the question. –  Thundar Aug 26 '13 at 15:26
    
After your edit there is nothing in the code which would cause the mentioned behavior, that code is fine. Only things that can now be a problem are whether the file is accessible and whether it is a valid PHP code file? since you mentioned its a blank file then that shouldn't be a problem. –  Hanky 웃 Panky Aug 26 '13 at 15:30
    
Unfortunately the file is accessible and the code, when it was not blank, was ok: I can navigate directly to the file, without errors. Anyway it is blank at now. I thought include shouldn't raise any fatal error, but the output looks like it. –  Thundar Aug 26 '13 at 15:45
    
After a lot of search, it looked up that errors were disabled by wordpress. And my test with blank file was completely wrong. There is something wrong about a global variable inside the include.. –  Thundar Aug 29 '13 at 14:45
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okay 2 things here .. if you have a piece of code after include statement request you to change it to the following format ..

include('".$filename."');

And secondly even if its a blank file, it always best to have quotes in it.

Also could let paste any specific error logs for this issue ..

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Can you explain why about the quotes please? I cannot understand your example –  Thundar Aug 29 '13 at 7:03
    
for comments aspects .. its a good coding convention as all includes files are within quotes .. Secondly in the php file please add <?php ?> in it . –  Shiva Aug 29 '13 at 10:21
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I would also recommend to use include_once() instead of include() if in function, otherwise the file will be included as many times as the function is called, possibly causing errors and definitely causing server resource waste.

Another advice is to use file name without path at all if both files caller and called are located in the same folder. In most cases this would be a better option (unless current working directory of the script differs from directory of the caller file) as when moving your files to another server your paths might change causing your scripts to stop working properly. That's when you're going to need to go file by file fixing up your paths.

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if your file is inside your template, then just include the file as follow

<?php include (TEMPLATEPATH . '/path/to/file.php'); ?>
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