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CLEANED UP TEXT:

How can I create m=5 random numbers that add upp to, say n=100. But, the first random number is say, 10 < x1 < 30, the second random nr is 5 < x2 < 20, the third random nr is 10 < x3 < 25, etc. So these five random numbers add up to 100. How can I create these constrained five numbers?

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[[

Related problem A1): The standard way to create five random numbers that add up to 100, is to sample four numbers between [0,100], and add the boundaries 0 and 100, and then sort these six numbers [0,x1,x2,x3,x4,100]. The five random numbers I seek, are the deltas. That is,

100 - x[4] = delta 5
x[4]- x[3] = delta 4
x[3]- x[2] = delta 3
x[2]- x[1] = delta 2
x[1] - 0   = delta 1

These five deltas will now add up to 100. For instance, they might be 0,1,2,7,90. Here is some code that solves this problem:

total_sum = 100
n = 5
v = numpy.random.multinomial(total_sum, numpy.ones(n)/n)

]]

.

For my problem, I can not allow wide intervals to occur, the largest spread above is 90-7 = 83 which is too wide. So, I have to specify a tighter spread, say [10,30]. This means the largest random number is 30, which disallows large spreads such as 83.

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[[

Related problem A2): A partial solution to create five numbers with identical boundaries, 10 < x_i < 30, that adds up to 100 is like this: Just do like in A1) but add the lower boundary 10, to the deltas. So I get the five random numbers that I seek like this:

100 - x[4] = delta 5 + 10
x[4]- x[3] = delta 4 + 10
x[3]- x[2] = delta 3 + 10
x[2]- x[1] = delta 2 + 10
x[1] - 0   = delta 1 + 10

Basically, I do exactly like in A1) but do not start from 0, but start from 10. Thus, each number has the lower boundary 10, but they dont have an upper boundary, it can be large, too large. How to limit the upper boundary to 30? Here the problem is how to limit the upper boundary

]]

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To recapitulate, the type of the problem I try to solve looks like this: I need five random numbers adding up to 100 and I need to specify the boundaries separately for each number, say [10,30] for the first random number, and then [5,10] for the second random number, and [15,35] for the third random number, etc. And they must all add up to 100.

But the real data I am using, has ~100 numbers x_i (m=50), all of them adding up to say ~400,000. And the range is typically [3000,5000] for a number x_i. These numbers are not really accurate, I am only trying to convey something about the problem size. The purpose is to do a MCMC simulation so these numbers need to be quickly generated. People have suggested very elegant solutions that really do work, but they take too long time, so I can not use them. The problem is still unsolved. Ideally I would like an O(m) solution and O(1) memory solution.

This problem should not be NP-hard, it doesnt feel like it. There should be a polynomial time solution, right?

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1  
Must the random numbers be integers? It may be easier if you allow all real numbers. –  Kevin Aug 26 '13 at 16:16
    
You need some additional constraints on the bounds or it might not even be possible to satisfy them. In any case, if you have a target sum, you can really only make at most 4 random choices, and then the last one is forced. So you might try just doing 4 choices within your constraints, and then picking the last one and seeing if it fits the constraint it's supposed to. –  BrenBarn Aug 26 '13 at 16:17
    
I think there was an off-by-one error in your description of the standard approach, you need 4 numbers to create 5 intervals. –  Adam Burry Aug 26 '13 at 16:34
    
It is definitely a polynomial time problem. See below. I couldn't make a partitioning-type combinatoric approach work, but fairly small discrete convolutions come to the rescue! –  Mike Housky Aug 27 '13 at 5:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Suppose you need n_1 in [10,30], n_2 in [20,40], n_3 in [30,50] and n1+n2+n3=90

If you need each possible triplet (n_1, n_2, n_3) to be equally-likely, that's going to be difficult. The number of triples of the form (20, n_2, n_3) is greater than the number of triples (10, n_2, n_3), so you can't just pick n_1 uniformly.

The incredibly slow but accurate way is to generate the all 5 randoms in the correct ranges and reject the whole group if the sum is not correct.

. . . AHA!

I found a way to parametrize the choice effectively. First, though, for simplicity note that the sum of the low bounds is the minimum possible sum. If subtract the sum of the low bounds from the target number and subtract the low bound from each generated number, you get a problem where each number is in the interval [0, max_k-min_k]. That simplifies the math and array (list) handling. Let n_k be the 0-based choice with 0<=n_k<=max_k-min_k.

The order of the sums is lexicographic, with all sums beginning with n_1=0 (if any) first, then n_1==1 sums, etc. Sums are sorted by n_2 in each of those groups, then by n_3, and so on. If you know how many sums add to the target (call that T), and how many sums start with n_1=0, 1, 2, ... then you can find the starting number n1 of sum number S in in that list. Then you can reduce the problem to adding n_2+n_3+... to get T-n_1, finding sum number S - (number original sums starting with number less than n_1).

Let pulse(n) be a list of n+1 ones: (n+1)*[1] in Python terms. Let max_k,min_k be the limits for the k'th choice, and m_k = max_k-min_k be the upper limit for 0-based choices. Then there are 1+m_1 different "sums" from the choice of the first number, and pulse(m_k) gives the distribution: 1 was to make each sum from 0 to m_1. For the first two choices, there are m_1+m_+1 different sums. It turns out that the convolution of pulse(m_1) with pulse(m_2) gives the distribution.

Time to stop for some code:

    def pulse(width, value=1):
        ''' Returns a vector of (width+1) integer ones. '''
        return (width+1)*[value]

    def stepconv(vector, width):
        ''' Computes the discrete convolution of vector with a "unit"
            pulse of given width.

            Formula: result[i] = Sum[j=0 to width] 1*vector[i-j]
            Where 0 <= i <= len(vector)+width-1, and the "1*" is the value
            of the implied unit pulse function: pulse[j] = 1 for 0<=j<=width.
        '''
        result = width*[0] + vector;
        for i in range(len(vector)):
            result[i] = sum(result[i:i+width+1])
        for i in range(len(vector), len(result)):
            result[i] = sum(result[i:])
        return result

That's coded specifically for only doing convolutions with a "pulse" array, so every linear combination in the convolution is just a sum.

Those are used only in the constructor of the final class solution:

class ConstrainedRandom(object):
    def __init__(self, ranges=None, target=None, seed=None):
        self._rand = random.Random(seed)
        if ranges != None: self.setrange(ranges)
        if target != None: self.settarget(target)

    def setrange(self, ranges):
        self._ranges = ranges
        self._nranges = len(self._ranges)
        self._nmin, self._nmax = zip(*self._ranges)
        self._minsum = sum(self._nmin)
        self._maxsum = sum(self._nmax)
        self._zmax = [y-x for x,y in self._ranges]
        self._rconv = self._nranges * [None]
        self._rconv[-1] = pulse(self._zmax[-1])
        for k in range(self._nranges-1, 0, -1):
            self._rconv[k-1] = stepconv(self._rconv[k], self._zmax[k-1])

    def settarget(self, target):
        self._target = target

    def next(self, target=None):
        k = target if target != None else self._target
        k = k - self._minsum;
        N = self._rconv[0][k]
        seq = self._rand.randint(0,N-1)
        result = self._nranges*[0]
        for i in range(len(result)-1):
            cv = self._rconv[i+1]
            r_i = 0
            while k >= len(cv):
                r_i += 1
                k -= 1
            while cv[k] <= seq:
                seq -= cv[k]
                r_i += 1
                k -= 1
            result[i] = r_i
        result[-1] = k # t
        return [x+y for x,y in zip(result, self._nmin)]

    # end clss ConstrainedRandom

Use that with:

ranges = [(low, high), (low, high), ...]
cr = ConstrainedRandom(ranges, target)
seq = cr.next();
print(seq)
assert sum(seq)==target

seq = cr.next(); # get then get the next one.

...etc. The class could be trimmed down a bit, but the main space overhead is in the _rconv list, which has the stored convolutions. That's roughly N*T/2, for O(NT) storage.

The convolutions only use the ranges, with a lot of randoms generated with the same constraints, the table construction time "amortizes away" to zero. The time complexity of .next() is roughly T/2 on average and O(T), in terms of the number of indexes into the _rconv lists.


To see how the algorithm works, assume a sequence of 3 zero-based choices, with max values (5,7,3), and a 0-based target T=10. Define or import the pulse and stepconv functions in an Idle session, then:

>>> pulse(5)
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> K1 = pulse (5)
>>> K2 = stepconv(K1, 7)
>>> K3 = stepconv(K2, 3)
>>> K1
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> K2
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
>>> K3
[1, 3, 6, 10, 14, 18, 21, 23, 23, 21, 18, 14, 10, 6, 3, 1]
>>> K3[10]
18
>>> sum(K3)
192
>>> (5+1)*(7+1)*(3+1)
192

K3[i] shows the number of different choice n_1, n_2, n_3 such that 0 <= n_k <= m_k and Σ n_k = i. Letting * mean convolution when applied to two of these lists. Then pulse(m_2)*pulse(m_3) is gives the distribution of sums of n_2 and n_3:

>>> R23 = stepconv(pulse(7),3)
>>> R23
[1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 3, 2, 1]
>>> len(R23)
11

Every value from 0 to T=10 is (barely) possible, so any choice is possible for the first number and there are R23[T-n_1] possible triplets adding to T=10 that start with N1. So, once you've found that there are 18 possible sums adding to 10, generate a random number S = randint(18) and count down through the R23[T:T-m_1-1:-1] array:

>>> R23[10:10-5-1:-1]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4]
>>> sum(R23[10:10-5-1:-1])
18

Note the sum of that list is the total computed in K3[10] above. A sanity check. Anyway, if S==9 was the random choice, then find how many leading terms of that array can be summed without exceeding S. That's the value of n_1. In this case 1+2+3 <= S but 1+2+3+4 > S, so n_1 is 3.

As described above, you can then reduce the problem to find n_2. The final number (n_3 in this example) will be uniquely determined.

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Wow! This was really diligent. I dont really understand your solution yet, as it seems very advanced. I am impressed! :) Three questions: A) Could you please provide a high level overview to your approach, so I can read some and be able to understand your solution? B) Could you please provide a manual how to use your solution? An example with some constraints and how to get the solution. C) Does your solution have any constraints? –  Orvar Korvar Sep 1 '13 at 22:14
    
Clarification regarding A) something like "I am using discrete convolutions, because they have the property that adding two numbers will produce a third looking like this... " –  Orvar Korvar Sep 1 '13 at 22:27
    
@OrvarKorvar: The "manual" is already in there, under "Use that with:" after the class definition. Type/paste the two functions and class into constrainedrandom.py, then from contrainedrandom import *, then try a few samples. –  Mike Housky Sep 5 '13 at 20:27
    
@orvarKorvar: I use discrete convolutions because they compute the distribution of the sum of two randoms. If random A has distribution D_A and random B has distribution D_B, then the distribution of the random sum (A+B) is the convolution of D_A and D_B. All of the material below the horizontal line, starting with "To see how the algorithm works" is my attempt at showing exactly what tables are needed and why. Import the pulse and stepconv functions and step through that. –  Mike Housky Sep 5 '13 at 20:48

First, define your ranges:

ranges = [range(11,30), range(6,20), range(11,25)]

Then enumerate all possibilities:

def constrainedRandoms(ranges):
    answer = []
    for vector in itertools.product(*ranges):
        if sum(ranges) == 100:
            answer.append(vector)
    return answer

Equivalent one-liner:

answer = [v for v in itertools.product(*ranges) if sum(v)==100]

Then pick a random element from them:

myChoice = random.choice(answer)

EDIT:

The cartesian product (computed with itertools.product) itself doesn't eat much RAM (this is because itertools.product returns a generator, which uses O(1) space, but a lot of time as you pointed out). Only computing the list (answer) does. The bad news is that in order to use random.choice, you do need a list. If you really don't want to use a list, then you might need to come up with a decaying probability function. Here's a very simple probability function that you could use:

def constrainedRandoms(ranges):
    choices = (v for v in itertools.product(*ranges) if sum(v)==100) # note the parentheses. This is now a generator as well

    prob = 0.5
    decayFactor = 0.97 # set this parameter yourself, to better suit your needs
    try:
        answer = next(choices)
    except StopIteration:
        answer = None
    for choice in choices:
        answer = choice
        if random.uniform(0,1) >= prob:
            return answer
        prob *= decayFactor
    return answer

The decaying probability allows you increase the probability with which you will select the next vector that fits your constraints. Think about it this way: you have a bunch of constraints. Chances are, that you'll have a relatively small number of vectors that satisfy these constraints. This means that every time you decide not to use a vector, the probability that there is another such vector decreases. Therefore, over time, you need to be progressively more biased towards returning the current vector as "the randomly selected vector". Of course, it is still possible to go through the entire loop structure without ever returning a vector. This is why the code starts with a default of the first vector that fits the constraints (assuming one exists) and returns the last such vector if the decaying probability never allows for a vector to be returned.
Note that this decaying probability idea allows you to not have to iterate through all candidate vectors. With time, the probability of the code returning the current vector under consideration increases, thus reducing the probability of it continuing on and considering other vectors. This idea therefore helps mitigate your concerns about the runtime as well (though, I'm embarrassed to add, not by very much)

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What is the asterisk in (*ranges) about? –  jeremynealbrown Aug 26 '13 at 16:31
    
it does list and tuple unpacking. So in this case, it sends the sublists contained in ranges as individual arguments to itertools.product as opposed to sending ranges by itself, which is a list of lists –  inspectorG4dget Aug 26 '13 at 16:34
    
Nice, that is a great feature. Thanks. –  jeremynealbrown Aug 26 '13 at 16:36
    
@jeremynealbrown: check this out –  inspectorG4dget Aug 26 '13 at 16:59
    
Your suggestion solves the problem I asked for, in a very neat way. Thank you. However, the time complexity is quite bad. Basically, you are creating the cartesian product (all possible combinations) and if one of the combination adds up to 100, it is a valid answer. I have many numbers so the cartesian product would be quite large, eating up RAM. Anyway, if I cant find a more efficient way, I will use your solution. At last I have a solution! Thanks! :o) –  Orvar Korvar Aug 26 '13 at 19:36

Try this:

import random
a = random.randint(10, 30)
b = random.randint(5, 20)
c = random.randint(10, 25)
d = random.randint(5, 15)
e = 100 - (a+b+c+d)

EDIT:

Here's how you'd generate a list of n random numbers, given n range constraints and the desired target sum:

def generate(constraints, limit):
    ans = [random.choice(c) for c in constraints]
    return ans if sum(ans) == limit else generate(constraints, limit)

This is how you'd use it:

generate([range(10,31),range(5,21),range(10,26),range(5,16),range(10,26)], 100)
=> [25, 20, 25, 12, 18]

Be aware, though: if the constraints don't guarantee that the sum is eventually reached, you'll get an infinite loop and a stack overflow error, for example:

generate([range(1,11), range(10, 21)], 100)
=> RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded while calling a Python object
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the right way to get started, but note that this doesn't guarantee that e satisfies whatever constraints might exist on it (e.g., he might have a constraint that says 10 < e < 20, but with some random choices for the others, e could be forced to be 70). –  BrenBarn Aug 26 '13 at 16:18
    
@BrenBarn I'm aware of that, but all the constraints must be explicitly specified (no "etc." as in the question). With that, it'd be possible to keep generating the 5 numbers in a loop until all constraints are satisfied –  Óscar López Aug 26 '13 at 16:21
    
@BrenBarn I updated my answer with a more general solution addressing your concerns –  Óscar López Aug 26 '13 at 16:36
    
Thanks for your 2nd edited suggestion. It solves the problem too. As I understand it, you are basically generating random numbers and if they add up to 100, you are done. Otherwise, you generate some new numbers and try again. That might take time though. I would prefer a more efficient way. But I might use your solution if I cant find a more efficient way. Thanks! :) –  Orvar Korvar Aug 26 '13 at 19:47
    
@OrvarKorvar for a few numbers (say, 10? 100?) it's perfectly fine to retry until you find a set of numbers that match the given constraints. Granted, it's a brute-force approach, but it might be quick enough for your needs. Use it, profile it and if it's good enough, leave it as it is. Only optimize if it truly becomes a bottleneck, remember - early optimization is the root of all evil! –  Óscar López Aug 26 '13 at 20:02

Here is a generalized solution:

import random
def constrained_rndms(constraints, total):
    result = []
    for x, y in constraints:
        result.append(random.randint(x,y))
    result.append(total - sum(result))
    return result

s = constrained_rndms([(10,20),(5,20),(10,25),(5,15)],100) # -- [19, 5, 16, 15, 45]
sum(s) # -- 100
share|improve this answer
    
A question, you are specifying four constraints, but your solution produce five random numbers. So the fifth number, how does it look like, what are it's constraints? I need to specify the fifth number too. –  Orvar Korvar Aug 26 '13 at 19:56
    
Ok, I get it. You are basically doing: x5 = 100 - (x1+x2+x3+x4), so the value of x5 is what is leftover. Right? So, basically, x1, x2,x3, x4 could all have very low values, which makes x5 very large, maybe take the value 90? So this solution allows x5 to be very large. So I cant use your solution, but thanks for your suggestion! :) –  Orvar Korvar Aug 26 '13 at 20:14
    
x5 is only going to be as large as you allow it to be based on the constraints given. In the example, the largest x5 could be is 70. If that is too high just change the lowest number in each constraint. –  jeremynealbrown Aug 26 '13 at 22:58

One could count the number of ways to make each possible total using two spans, four spans, eight spans, and so forth (where a span is a range of integers including its endpoints). With those numbers tabulated, you can work backwards toward a sample. For example, suppose there are 16 spans, each including numbers 1 to 9. One finds there are w = 202752772954792 ways to make a total of t = 100. Choose a random number r in the range 1 to w. Search (or lookup) to find a number J such that the sum with J>j of leftways(t-j)*rightways(j)) exceeds r and the sum with J>j+1 does not, where leftways(i) is the number of ways of making i using the first 8 spans, and rightways(j) is the number of ways of making j using the last 8 spans. Recurse using i = t-j with the first 8 spans and j with the last 8, etc. Base cases occur whenever there is only one way of making a required total.

The code below can be revised to run more efficiently by sorting the spans into descending order by width (that is, list the widest spans first) and removing some swaps. Note that if spans are not in descending order by width, the result vector will not be in the same order as the spans. Also, it might be possible to replace the linear for j ... search in findTarget by a binary search but I haven't figured out how to do so without using quite a bit more space.

The code could be made cleaner and more clear by using objects to store the tree structures, instead of just tuples.

Space used probably is O(s²·(lg m)) if there are m spans whose maxima total up to s. Time used is O(s²·(lg m)) for the initial tabulation of sums of products and probably O(m+(lg m)·(s/m)) or O(m+(lg m)·s) for each sample. (I haven't properly analyzed space and time requirements.) On a 2GHz machine, the code as shown produces about 8000 samples per second if there are 16 identical spans 1...10; about 5000 samples per second if there are 32 identical spans 1...3; and about 2000 samples per second if there are 32 identical spans 1...30. Some sample outputs for various target totals and sets of spans are shown after the code.

from random import randrange
def randx(hi):   # Return a random integer from 1 to hi
    return 1+randrange(hi) if hi>0 else 0

# Compute and return c with each cell k set equal to 
# sum of products a[k-j] * b[j], taken over all relevant j
def sumprods(lt, rt):
    a, b = lt[0], rt[0]
    (la,ma,aa), (lb,mb,bb) = a, b
    if ma-la < mb-lb:           # Swap so |A| >= |B|
        la, ma, aa, lb, mb, bb = lb, mb, bb, la, ma, aa
    lc, mc = la+lb, ma+mb
    counts = [0]*(mc+1)
    for k in range(lc,mc+1):
        for j in range(max(lb,k-ma), min(mb,k-la)+1):
            counts[k] += aa[k-j] * bb[j]
    return (lc, mc, counts)

def maketree(v):
    lv = len(v)
    if lv<2:
        return (v[0], None, None)
    ltree = maketree(v[:lv/2])
    rtree = maketree(v[lv/2:])
    return (sumprods(ltree, rtree), ltree, rtree)


def findTarget(tototal, target, tree):
    global result
    lt, rt = tree[1], tree[2]
    # Put smaller-range tree second
    if lt[0][1]-lt[0][0] < rt[0][1]-rt[0][0]: lt, rt = rt, lt
    (la,ma,aa), (lb,mb,bb) = lt[0], rt[0]
    lc, mc = la+lb, ma+mb
    count = 0
    for j in range(max(lb,tototal-ma), min(mb,tototal-la)+1):
        i = tototal-j
        count += aa[i] * bb[j]
        if count >= target: break
    # Suppose that any way of getting i in left tree is ok
    if lt[1]: findTarget(i, randx(aa[i]), lt)
    else: result += [i]
    # Suppose that any way of getting j in right tree is ok
    if rt[1]: findTarget(j, randx(bb[j]), rt)
    else: result += [j]

spans, ttotal, tries = [(1,6), (5,11), (2,9), (3,7), (4,9), (4,12), (5,8),
                        (3,5), (2,9), (3,11), (3,9), (4,5), (5,9), (6,13),
                        (7,8), (4,11)],  100, 10

spans, ttotal, tries = [(10*i,10*i+9) for i in range(16)], 1300, 10000

spans, ttotal, tries = [(1,3) for i in range(32)],  64, 10000

spans, ttotal, tries = [(1,10) for i in range(16)], 100, 10

print 'spans=', spans
vals = [(p, q, [int(i>=p) for i in range(q+1)]) for (p,q) in spans]
tree = maketree(vals)
nways = tree[0][2][ttotal]
print 'nways({}) = {}'.format(ttotal, nways)
for i in range(1,tries):
    result = []
    findTarget(ttotal, randx(nways), tree)
    print '{:2}: {}  {}'.format(i, sum(result), result)

In the output samples shown below, the lines with colons contain a sample number, a sample-total, and a sample-values array. Other lines show the set of spans and the number of ways of making a desired total.

spans= [(1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10), (1, 10)]
nways(100) = 202752772954792
 1: 100  [8, 9, 1, 2, 8, 1, 10, 6, 6, 3, 6, 10, 6, 10, 10, 4]
 2: 100  [2, 6, 10, 3, 1, 10, 9, 5, 10, 6, 2, 10, 9, 7, 4, 6]
 3: 100  [1, 6, 5, 1, 9, 10, 10, 7, 10, 2, 8, 9, 10, 9, 2, 1]
 4: 100  [10, 7, 6, 3, 7, 8, 6, 5, 7, 7, 5, 1, 9, 6, 9, 4]
 5: 100  [7, 1, 10, 5, 5, 4, 9, 5, 3, 9, 2, 8, 6, 8, 10, 8]
    spans= [(1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3), (1, 3)]
nways(64) = 159114492071763
 1: 64  [2, 2, 1, 3, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 2, 3, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 1, 2, 3, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2]
 2: 64  [1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 2, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 2]
 3: 64  [2, 1, 3, 2, 3, 3, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 3, 1, 3, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 3, 2, 2, 3, 2, 3, 1]
 4: 64  [2, 3, 3, 2, 3, 2, 1, 3, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 2, 2, 3, 3, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1, 3]
 5: 64  [1, 1, 1, 3, 2, 2, 3, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 3, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 1, 3, 3, 1]
spans= [(0, 9), (10, 19), (20, 29), (30, 39), (40, 49), (50, 59), (60, 69), (70, 79), (80, 89), (90, 99), (100, 109), (110, 119), (120, 129), (130, 139), (140, 149), (150, 159)]
nways(1323) = 5444285920
 1: 1323  [8, 19, 25, 35, 49, 59, 69, 76, 85, 99, 108, 119, 129, 139, 148, 156]
 2: 1323  [8, 16, 29, 39, 48, 59, 69, 77, 88, 95, 109, 119, 129, 138, 147, 153]
 3: 1323  [9, 16, 28, 39, 49, 58, 69, 79, 87, 96, 106, 115, 128, 138, 149, 157]
 4: 1323  [8, 17, 29, 36, 45, 58, 69, 78, 89, 99, 106, 119, 128, 135, 149, 158]
 5: 1323  [9, 16, 27, 34, 48, 57, 69, 79, 88, 99, 109, 119, 128, 139, 144, 158]
    spans= [(1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (
1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (
1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30), (
1, 30), (1, 30), (1, 30)]
nways(640) = 19144856039395888221416547336829636235610525
 1: 640  [7, 24, 27, 9, 30, 23, 30, 27, 28, 29, 2, 30, 28, 19, 7, 27, 10, 2, 21, 23, 24, 2
7, 24, 16, 29, 8, 13, 23, 2, 19, 27, 25]
 2: 640  [30, 2, 17, 28, 30, 16, 5, 1, 26, 24, 22, 19, 26, 16, 16, 30, 27, 15, 19, 30, 15,
 30, 22, 5, 30, 9, 13, 25, 19, 15, 30, 28]
 3: 640  [2, 24, 1, 23, 20, 5, 30, 22, 24, 19, 22, 9, 28, 29, 5, 24, 14, 30, 24, 16, 26, 2
1, 26, 20, 20, 19, 24, 29, 24, 8, 23, 29]
 4: 640  [7, 20, 16, 24, 22, 14, 28, 28, 26, 8, 21, 9, 22, 24, 28, 19, 5, 13, 9, 24, 25, 2
2, 29, 18, 20, 21, 17, 26, 30, 9, 26, 30]
share|improve this answer
    
It seems that there are some constraints in your solution? Like, the spans can not be arbitrary but must be descending in order by width? My problems need arbitrary spans. :( –  Orvar Korvar Sep 1 '13 at 22:14
    
Orvar, spans can be arbitrary but if they are out of width-order then results are returned out of order. There are half a dozen ways to deal with the problem. The simplest is to create a function that re-orders the result. –  jwpat7 Sep 1 '13 at 23:07

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