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Assume the following table

Employee

EmployeeID           INT
FirstName            VARCHAR(50)
LastName             VARCHAR(50)
SupervisorEmployeeID INT
Salary               MONEY
HireDate             DATETIME
  1. How to show the number of employees hired per year for the last 5 years also include the average salary for employees hired in those years.

  2. How to show the number of employees hired per year for the last 5 years also include the average salary for employees hired in those years.

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2  
What have you tried so far? –  JoeFletch Aug 26 '13 at 16:21
    
SELECT COUNT(EmployeeID ) FROM Employee WHERE MONTHS_BETWEEN(getdate(), HireDate) <= 60; –  Milson Aug 26 '13 at 16:23
    
Are Q1 and Q2 supposed to be the same? –  Nicholas Post Aug 26 '13 at 16:30
    
Yes for correction :) –  Milson Aug 26 '13 at 16:33
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1 Answer

Checkout the DatePart function in SQL. It will break up and group dates based on the interval supplied (ie. day, month, year, etc.)

Sample:

SELECT
    DatePart(year,HireDate)
    ,Count(emplid)
    ,AVG(salary)
FROM Employee
WHERE DATEDIFF(YEAR, HireDate, GetDate) <= 4
GROUP BY DatePart(year,HireDate) 
ORDER BY DatePart(year,HireDate) asc
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is DatePart() is in-built function in MSSQL? @nicholas –  Milson Aug 26 '13 at 16:30
1  
Yes, it should be. –  Nicholas Post Aug 26 '13 at 16:31
    
don't <=4 only shows less than 4 years I need 5 years? –  Milson Aug 26 '13 at 16:34
    
Don't forget year 0, 0 (current year), 1 (last year), etc. This would show 5 years total (including current year). –  Nicholas Post Aug 26 '13 at 16:35
1  
You can also use YEAR(HireDate) instead of DatePart(year,HireDate)... –  bastos.sergio Aug 26 '13 at 16:36
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