Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm trying to serialize the following class into XML:

[XmlRoot("FCS_SET_SCH")]
public class DDCSendReceiveScheduleXml
{
    private const string TABLE_NAME = "DDCScheduler";

    [XmlElement("schedule",Order=1)]
    public List<ScheduleXml> ScheduleList { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("timetable",Order=2)]
    public List<TimeTableXml> TimeTableXmlList { get; set; }

    public DDCSendReceiveScheduleXml()
    {

    }
}

Order flag works if I were to serialize a single object each, but it doesn't seem to control the ordering on list.

This is how the XmlSerializer serializes the two lists at the moment:

<FCS_SET_SCH xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
   <schedule>...</schedule>
   <schedule>...</schedule>
   <timetable>...</timetable>
   <timetable>...</timetable>
</FCS_SET_SCH>

Is there any way I can control the serialization so that the above comes in this order?

<FCS_SET_SCH xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
   <schedule>...</schedule>
   <timetable>...</timetable>
   <schedule>...</schedule>
   <timetable>...</timetable>
</FCS_SET_SCH>
share|improve this question
1  
Why? Order of elements in XML shouldn't matter unless you're using a very restrictive parser. – D Stanley Aug 26 '13 at 17:15
    
@DStanley Precisely. This is for a parser on an embedded device that has it's own ridiculous rules on ordering of XML. – l46kok Aug 26 '13 at 17:16

You could use the ISerializable to Gain more control about the Serialization process. When you inplement the interface you can access the GetObjectData method

// Implement this method to serialize data. The method is called  
// on serialization. 
public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
{
    var smallest = (TimeTableXmlList.Count < ScheduleList.Count ?? TimeTableXmlList.Count : ScheduleList.Count )
    for(int x = 0; x < smallest; x++)
    {
        var time = TimeTableXmlList.ElementAt(x);
        var schedule = ScheduleList.ElementAt(x)
                // Use the AddValue method to specify serialized values.
        info.AddValue("timetable", time, typeof(TimeTableXml));
        info.AddValue("schedule", schedule , typeof(ScheduleXml));
    }
}

code example is untested

share|improve this answer
    
Ooh, I like this idea. – Haney Aug 26 '13 at 17:26
    
Nice to hear, but i'm not sure that his device think so too^^ that must he confirm.Of cause the example is not perfect because it just allow you to use the smaller list. He must edit it to fit for his purposes. And when he use this interface he MUST also implement the other parts of the Process!!! Very Impotent! – Venson Aug 26 '13 at 17:30
    
This is basically what I was looking for. For some reason, it's not working for me. I need to implement the interface on the class that's being serialized right? It doesn't seem to enter GetObjectData function when I call System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer.Serialize on my class. Am I missing something? [Edit: Ah nvm. XmlSerializer doesn't use that interface, I must use IXmlSerializable. I will give this a shot and see.] – l46kok Aug 26 '13 at 17:32
    
Try use the SoapFormatter. SOAP is based on XML. You must use a class that inhertes from IFormatter – Venson Aug 26 '13 at 17:35
    
Wow.. my god both solutions are killing me, I genuinely didn't think it'd be this difficult. I don't understand why I have to introduce a huge amount of code to just switch the order of xml written or add another dependency for that matter.. – l46kok Aug 26 '13 at 18:15

Represent the items as related, such as a List<KeyValuePair<ScheduleXml, TimeTableXml>> if you want the items to be paired.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

With the helpful answers and comments, I was eventually able to get the right solution. I'm posting what I did here to help others who face a similar problem.

The easy and proper way of doing this is to implement IXmlSerializable if you are using XmlSerializer to begin with.

[XmlRoot("FCS_SET_SCH")]
public class DDCSendReceiveScheduleXml : IXmlSerializable
{
     ...
    public XmlSchema GetSchema()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        Debug.Assert(ScheduleList.Count == TimeTableXmlList.Count, "ScheduleList and TimeTableXml Count isn't same");
        XmlSerializer scheduleSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ScheduleXml));
        XmlSerializer timeTableSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TimeTableXml));
        for (int i = 0; i < ScheduleList.Count; i++)
        {
            scheduleSerializer.Serialize(writer, ScheduleList[i]);
            timeTableSerializer.Serialize(writer, TimeTableXmlList[i]);
        }
    }

This produces the result I initially wanted. Of course, this assumes that you've got the two classes already marked for Xml Serialization.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.