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e.g. I defined an function which needs several input arguments, if some keyword arguments not being assigned, typically there be an TypeError message, but I want to change it, to output an NaN as the result, could it be done?

def myfunc( S0, K ,r....):
    if  S0 = NaN or .....:

How to do it? Much appreciated.

Edited:

def myfunc(a):
    return a / 2.5 + 5

print myfunc('whatever')

>python -u "bisectnewton.py"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "bisectnewton.py", line 6, in <module>
    print myfunc('whatever')
  File "bisectnewton.py", line 4, in myfunc
    return a / 2.5 + 5
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for /: 'str' and 'float'
>Exit code: 1

What I want is, the myfunc(a) only accpets an number as the input, if some other data type like a string = 'whatever' inputed, I don't want to just output an default error message, I want it to output something like return 'NaN' to tell others that the input should be an number.

Now I changed it to this, but still not working, btw, is none the same as NaN? I think they're different.

def myfunc(S0):
    if math.isnan(S0):
        return 'NaN'
    return a / 2.5 + 5

print myfunc('whatever')

>python -u "bisectnewton.py"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "bisectnewton.py", line 8, in <module>
    print myfunc('whatever')
  File "bisectnewton.py", line 4, in myfunc
    if math.isnan(S0):
TypeError: a float is required
>Exit code: 1

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
After answering, I realized that your question isn't completely clear. Could you provide a short (5-10 lines should be enough), complete program that runs and demonstrates the error you are seeing? Consider the guidelines in SSCCE.ORG for how to generate the program. –  Robᵩ Aug 26 '13 at 19:42
    
Use math.isnan function to check if S0 is a NaN. –  Bakuriu Aug 26 '13 at 19:43
    
No, None is not the same as NaN. –  Robᵩ Aug 26 '13 at 21:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can capture the TypeError and do whatever you want with it:

def myfunc(a):
  try:
    return a / 2.5 + 5
  except TypeError:
    return float('nan')

print myfunc('whatever')

The Python Tutorial has an excellent chapter on this subject.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it works! but it seems that whatever kind of typeError it will return a NaN, what if it's not because that the input data type is wrong, but due to other typeErrors? also, the tutorial is good! –  StayFoolish Aug 26 '13 at 20:07
def myfunc(S0 = None, K = None, r = None, ....):
    if S0 is None or K is None or r is None:
        return NaN
share|improve this answer

Yes, to generate a NaN you do float('nan'):

>>> import math
>> float('nan')
nan
>>> math.isnan(float('nan'))
True

So you can return float('nan') wherever you want to return the nan. I recommend you just raise the exception, though.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I prefer to raise the exception, too. Just the assignment requires so, and I will definitely ask my professor. –  StayFoolish Aug 26 '13 at 20:08

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