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Sorry, just starting with node. This might be a very novice question.

Let's say I have some code which reads some files from a directory in the file system:

var fs = require('fs');

fs.readdir(__dirname + '/myfiles', function (err, files) {
    if (err) throw err;
    files.forEach(function (fileName) {
        fs.readFile(__dirname + '/myfiles/' + fileName, function (err, data) {
            if (err) throw err;
            console.log('finished reading file ' + fileName + ': ' + data);
            module.exports.files.push(data);
        });
    });
});

Note that all of this occurs asynchronously. Let's also say I have a Mocha test which executes this code:

describe('fileProvider', function () {
    describe('#files', function () {
        it.only('files array not empty', function () {
            assert(fileProvider.files.length > 0, 'files.length is zero');
        });
    });
});

The mocha test runs before the files are finished being read. I know this because I see the console.log statement after I see the little dot that indicates a mocha test being run (at least I think that is what is being indicated). Also, if I surround the assert with a setTimeout, the assert passes.

How should I structure my code so that I can ensure the async file operations are completed? Note that this is not just a problem with testing - I need the files to be loaded fully before I can do real work in my app as well.

I don't think the right answer is to read files synchronously, because that will block the Node request / response loop, right?

Bonus question:
Even if I put the assert in a setTimeout with a 0 timeout value, the test still passes. Is this because just putting it in a setTimeout kicks it to the end of the processing chain or something so the filesystem work finishes first?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You can implement a complete callback after all files have been read.

exports.files = [];
exports.initialize = initialize;

function initialize(callback) {
    var fs = require('fs');

    fs.readdir(__dirname + '/myfiles', function (err, files) {
        if (err) throw err;
        files.forEach(function (fileName) {
            fs.readFile(__dirname + '/myfiles/' + fileName, function (err, data) {
                if (err) throw err;
                console.log('finished reading file ' + fileName + ': ' + data);
                exports.files.push(data);
                if (exports.files.length == files.length) {
                    callback();
                }
            });
        });
}

You can call the file operation method by doing something like:

var f = require('./files.js');

if (f.files.length < 1) {
    console.log('initializing');
    f.initialize(function () { 
        console.log('After: ' + f.files.length);

        var another = require('./files.js');
        console.log('Another module: ' + another.files.length);
    });
}

EDIT: Since you want to only have to call this once, you could initialize it once when the application loads. According to Node.js documentation, modules are cached after the first time they are loaded. The two above examples have been edited as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm...okay I see what you're getting at. My hope was that I would have some module which loads the files which I could then just require('fileLoader') or whatever, and that would give me back the files. I have to use this in a bunch of places, and using a callback everywhere for it seems awkward. But yeah it would work. –  RationalGeek Aug 26 '13 at 20:09
    
@RationalGeek This is the way of things with node.js. It feels very awkward at first, but don't fight it. –  JohnnyHK Aug 26 '13 at 20:18
    
@RationalGeek, I understand what you mean. I've updated the answer with an alternative solution. I wouldn't do this synchronously, but I agree with JohnnyHK that doing it this way eventually feels better. –  making3 Aug 26 '13 at 20:39
    
Thanks guys. It seems pretty awkward to me even initializing at app start, because other modules won't be able to depend on the initialization being complete until an indeterminate time in the future. I will think more on this... –  RationalGeek Aug 27 '13 at 11:50

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