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I would like a responsive page which contains canvas elements inside a div. I should be able to simply wrap a canvas element inside another block element, and give that canvas a relative width. Although this method works in Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Opera, or course IE has to be the fly in the ointment! I'm not even trying versions older then IE9--this simple code example does not work as expected in IE9:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en-US">

    <head>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
        <title>Test IE9 Canvas Height</title>
        <style>
            body {
                margin: 0;
                padding: 0;
            }
            #container {
                position: relative;
                padding-top: 32%;
                background-color: #88f;
            }
            .instruments {
                position: absolute;
                bottom: 0%;
                width: 100%;
                padding-bottom: 16%;
                background-color: #8f8;
            }
            #circle {
                position: absolute;
                left: 42%;
                width: 16%;
            }
        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div id="container">
            <div class="instruments">
                <canvas id="circle"></canvas>
            </div>
        </div>
        <script>
            var canvas = document.getElementById("circle");
            var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

            // Default canvas is 300x150, so make it square
            canvas.height = canvas.width;

            ctx.beginPath();
            ctx.arc(canvas.width / 2, canvas.height / 2, canvas.width / 2, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
            ctx.fillStyle = "red";
            ctx.fill();
        </script>
    </body>

</html>

This simple page should render a blue block of height 32% of the body width, and then have another block in green overlapping the bottom 1/2. Inside the inner div is a canvas element which does not explicitly set the height and width--so that it can remain fluid for various window/body widths. The canvas should draw a round red circle, with the height completely contained within its containing div. Works great in every other browser except IE9 (and except IE10 too I think).

Even if I do specify a canvas size,

<canvas id="circle" width="300" height="300"></canvas>

it still doesn't work.

Is there something I am doing wrong, or is there a better method to achieve this goal? I do not want to style or code pixel or point sizes, and would prefer to avoid a javascript IE hack. Thank you

share|improve this question
    
If you want to resize the canvas without distortion, instead of CSS, use canvas.width and canvas.height in the resize event handler. If you must resize with CSS, resize the width and height by the same percentage. –  markE Aug 26 '13 at 20:19
    
I appreciate the tip, but I don't want a resize event handler. Sorry though, I did just try setting the css height to 100% and it worked on this simple example. Doing that did not work on my real page, so I now have to figure out the difference. I'll post a follow-up if the problem persists. –  Scotty Aug 26 '13 at 20:33
1  
FWIW, I think the behavior changed in IE11 to match the other browsers. –  EricLaw Aug 27 '13 at 4:17

1 Answer 1

Honestly your tone about IE being bad again makes me not want to help you all that much. Dial it down next time.

Your behavior here is kind of undefined, because canvass nature is to "stretch" their content and there is nothing in your code keeping your canvas square so no reason for it to scale evenly... You can see this for yourself by giving the canvas a background color... the short version is add:

height: 100%

to the canvas' css to make it work the way you want it to... hope this helps -ck


UPDATE:

I read your comment and you don't seem to understand that setting the canvas.width and canvas.height only changes the size of the internal "drawing surface" of the element. When you set the element's style (the default is auto) you are setting the display surface's dimensions. The problem that you are running into is that you are expecting the browser to preserve the canvass internal dimensions when one of it's style dimension members is set to auto and the other is not, like how it works with an img tag. Chrome & Firefox seem to behave this way. IE however is just letting your actual dimension come through, so in your case its as if you set the height to 300px. I'm not sure if there is a "spec correct" approach to this yet, but it seems like all implementations are converging on your preferred behavior.

Anyhow, the solution to your problem is to use an img tag since that tag will behave correctly and just use a data uri to get your canvas image into it:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en-US">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<title>Test IE9 Canvas Height</title>

<style>
    body {
      margin: 0;
      padding: 0;
    }

    #container {
      position: relative;
      padding-top: 32%;
      background-color: #88f;
    }

    .instruments {
      position: absolute;
      bottom: 0%;
      width: 100%;
      padding-bottom: 16%;
      background-color: #8f8;
    }

    #circle {
      position: absolute;
      left: 42%;
      width: 16%;
    }
</style>

</head>
<body>

<div id="container">
    <div class="instruments">
      <img id="circle" src=""/>
    </div>
</div>

<script>
    var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
    var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

    // Default canvas is 300x150, so make it square
    canvas.height = canvas.width = 300;  

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(canvas.width/2, canvas.height/2, canvas.width/2, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
    ctx.fillStyle = "red";
    ctx.fill();

    var img = document.getElementById('circle');
    img.src = canvas.toDataURL();
</script>

</body>

</html>

That will give you the effect you were looking for without need for any further hacks...

On a side note, your css technique of using padding to "size" an element with a percent is a little fragile (like all % based css techniques). If I were using a % based css layout, I would probably using something like this:

<style>
    html, body {
      margin: 0;
      padding: 0;
      height:100%;
    }

    #container {
      height: 33%;
      background-color: #88f;
    }

    .instruments {
      height:50%;
      background-color: #8f8;
      position:relative;
      top:50%;
    }

    #circle {
      display:block;
      margin:auto;
      width:auto;
      height:100%;
    }
</style>

you can see the full thing (with modified css) in action here: http://jsbin.com/ajoTUZA/2/quiet

I hope that this helps -ck

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, maybe fair, maybe not. The fact is that IE has been so terrible and caused so much pain in the past, and in this case, every single other browser works as expected. Also, in my code, I did actually set canvas.height = canvas.width. What I have discovered is that in IE9, even any absolute positioned containing block must explicitly set the height--so if the canvas is wrapped in a div, that div must set height to 100%. Therefore, you are correct, although if the canvas appears in another block, it too must set the height to 100%. So yes, there was tone, but it was not without merit. –  Scotty Aug 26 '13 at 21:07
    
@user2170218 setting the canvass dimensions isn't the same as setting them in css. canvas still has a normal canvas.style.width and canvas.style.height personally, I always set canvas.style.width = canvas.width + 'px'; and the same for height (after giving them numerical values) and I've never had a problem with any implementation. And we all know IE has been a pain in the past, but the rhetoric just makes you sound like some kind of fanboy or something... –  ckozl Aug 27 '13 at 12:51

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