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Hi I'm trying to write a batch files that will search some directories and output a text file report with a list of files saved in the last day between a certain file size.

The files size part is no problem - but how to I parse the date and check it against todays date, and add it to the 'if' statement?

This is what I have so far:

@echo Report will open when complete
@echo Working
@echo off
setlocal
set "SEARCH_DIR=f:"
set "MIN_SIZE=1"
set "MAX_SIZE=300000"
set "REPORT=F:\Error_report.txt"

echo **************************************************** >> %REPORT%
echo File report %date% %time% >> %REPORT%
echo File size %MIN_SIZE% to %MAX_SIZE% >> %REPORT%
echo **************************************************** >> %REPORT%

echo File list: >> %REPORT%

for /R "%SEARCH_DIR%" %%F in (*) do (
   if exist "%%F" if %%~zF LSS %MAX_SIZE% if %%~zF GEQ %MIN_SIZE% echo %%F >> %REPORT%
)

@echo Done

START %REPORT%

I've tried adding if forfiles /d +1 to the if statement - but that doesn't work!

Any help would be appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

you can use GNU find for Windows for this:

 find * -size +1k -mtime -1
-size  n[c]
    The primary shall evaluate as true if the file size in bytes, divided by 512 and rounded up to the next integer, is n. If n is followed by the character 'c', the size shall be in bytes.
-atime  n
    The primary shall evaluate as true if the file access time subtracted from the initialization time, divided by 86400 (with any remainder discarded), is n.
-ctime  n
    The primary shall evaluate as true if the time of last change of file status information subtracted from the initialization time, divided by 86400 (with any remainder discarded), is n.
-mtime  n
    The primary shall evaluate as true if the file modification time subtracted from the initialization time, divided by 86400 (with any remainder discarded), is n.

OPERANDS

    The following operands shall be supported:

    The path operand is a pathname of a starting point in the directory hierarchy.

    The first argument that starts with a '-', or is a '!' or a '(', and all subsequent arguments shall be interpreted as an expression made up of the following primaries and operators. In the descriptions, wherever n is used as a primary argument, it shall be interpreted as a decimal integer optionally preceded by a plus ( '+' ) or minus ( '-' ) sign, as follows:

    +n
        More than n.
    n
        Exactly n.
    -n
        Less than n.


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I think PowerShell should be far more appropriate here:

function Get-ErrorReport {
  param(
    [string]$Path = 'F:\',
    [long]$MinSize = 1,
    [long]$MaxSize = 300000,
    [string]$OutputPath = 'F:\Error_report.txt'
  )

  Get-ChildItem -Recurse $Path |
    Where-Object {
      $_.Length -ge $MinSize -and
      $_.Length -le $MaxSize -and
      $_.LastWriteTime -gt (Get-Date).AddDays(-1)
    } |
    Select-Object -ExpandProperty FullName |
    Out-File $OutputPath

  Invoke-Item $OutputPath
}

To be called in various ways

Get-ErrorReport
Get-ErrorReport -MinSize 1KB -MaxSize 10MB
Get-ErrorReport -Path X:\ -OutputPath X:\report.txt
...
share|improve this answer

Why don't you directly use the find utility? You can do the filtering of files in a single call and wrap that in some text. An example:

find Documents/ -daystart -mtime "1" -size +1k

See the man page for details, also there are millions of examples out there in the internet.

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I suspect the OP is not on a (li)(u)nix box... –  rene Aug 26 '13 at 20:35
    
Sorry, actually I now realize this indeed looks like MS-Windoze (spotted the `F:\` notation). Then indeed such utilities are not available, sorry. Funny, that didn't even occur to me, nearly everyone here on SO uses Linux these days... –  arkascha Aug 26 '13 at 20:37
    
LOL...dream on... –  rene Aug 26 '13 at 20:41
    
What's linux?!!! –  user2719310 Aug 27 '13 at 7:54
    
Come on guys, what is the point in starting another OS war? I didn't spot that detail, since the OP didn't mention what system he uses. And in my experience most people here use Linux, at least for the questions I usually take a look at. Why is this so unthinkable? –  arkascha Aug 27 '13 at 9:11

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