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I'm generating a PDF document using iTextSharp within an ASP .net application.

My users are opening the PDF on an iPad, and adding a signature [drawing], then e-mailing the signed document.

The signature looks right on the iPad, but once it's e-mailed, the signature gets rotated 90 degrees counter-clockwise. If I instead save to Acrobat online, the problem doesn't occur.

Rotated Signatures

Edit: I can't share the original pdfs, because they contain legal and financial info. I can share another test pdf we used that had the same problem. It wasn't generated by itext, but it seems to indicate that the problem is with the adobe iOS app, rather than the application that created it.

The e-mailed PDF (with rotated drawing)

The uploaded PDF from Acrobat.com (working as intended)

Other information:

Apple iPad 2 MC773LL/A Tablet (16GB, Wifi + AT&T 3G, Black) 2nd Generation iOS version: 6.0.1 (10A523) Adobe Reader version 11.0.0

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Please provide a sample pdfs. And also please be aware that while iOS has done pdf functionality built in, this functionality is quite limited. This, maybe the iOS component does not recognize rotation or similar effects. –  mkl Aug 26 '13 at 22:25
    
@mkl: Good point about the built-in functionality, but this is actually loaded in the Adobe PDF app. I was using its feature to add a signature (drawing), then flatten and email. –  Dale K Aug 27 '13 at 19:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In a nutshell

The e-mailed PDF is based on the uploaded PDF. The change is that the original document (the uploaded PDF) contains two annotations which in the changed document (the e-mailed PDF) have been flattened, i.e. stored in the page content instead.

Unfortunately the software doing that flattening simply appended commands for showing the annotation appearances to the page content ignoring the fact that the transformation matrix has been changed (rotated) in the already existing page content. Thus, the signatures are rotated, too, after form flattening.

Thus, the software doing this form flattening has to be repaired (simply appending to the content without considering that the transformation matrix might have been changed actually is a no-go!).

As a short term solution, though, (in case the software doing the flattening cannot be easily replaced) you might consider using base PDFs which do not use rotation for creating landscape PDFs.

In case of documents created with iText(Sharp) (which you mention in your question) this might mean using

new Document(new Rectangle(792, 612));

(cf the iText(Sharp) sample HelloWorldLandscape2.java / HelloWorldLandscape2.cs)

instead of

new Document(PageSize.LETTER.Rotate()));

(cf. the iText(Sharp) sample HelloWorldLandscape1.java / HelloWorldLandscape1.cs)

As explained in iText in Action — 2nd Edition,

there are subtle differences internally [which] will matter when you want to manipulate the PDF.

In detail

In the original PDF, the page dictionary references the signatures by means of annotations

3 0 obj
<<
  /Type/Page
  /Parent 2 0 R
  /MediaBox[ 0 0 612 792]
  /Rotate 270
  /Contents 5 0 R
  /Resources<</Font<</F1 4 0 R>>/ProcSet[/PDF/Text]>>
  /Annots 11 0 R
>>
endobj 
11 0 obj
[ 12 0 R 15 0 R 16 0 R 19 0 R]
endobj 

Objects 12 and 16 are the ink annotations referencing appearance streams in objects 14 and 18 respectively.

The content stream in object 5 sets

0.0000 -1.0000 1.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 cm

As you see, the page is rotated (/Rotate 270) and the content stream is rotated the other direction (0 -1 1 0 0 0 cm) to enable upright printing. The annotation appearance streams, though, are not subject to this back-rotation and, therefore, do that internally themselves.

In the flattened page it looks like this

3 0 obj
<<
  /Type/Page
  /Parent 2 0 R
  /MediaBox[ 0 0 612 792]
  /Rotate 270
  /Resources
  <<
    /Font<</F1 4 0 R>>
    /ProcSet[/PDF/Text]
    /XObject<</CprRpt2 14 0 R/CprRpt3 18 0 R>>
  >>
  /Annots 11 0 R
  /Contents[ 5 0 R 20 0 R]>>
endobj 
11 0 obj
[]
endobj 

And the content stream in object 20 contains

q 1 0 0 1 223.453 24.0703  cm /CprRpt2 Do Q 
q 1 0 0 1 410.246 59.9062  cm /CprRpt3 Do Q 

So, the annotations are removed (empty array in object 11) but the appearance streams of the Ink annotations are now directly included in the content stream itself (/CprRpt2 Do and /CprRpt3 Do defined to reference objects 14 and 18 in the Resources) instead.

Thus, these appearance streams now also are subject to the rotating transformation matrix from object 5 (0 -1 1 0 0 0 cm) as the stream 20 is after stream 5 in the content stream array [ 5 0 R 20 0 R]. They also (see above) counteract the page rotation themselves, though. In essence, therefore, the rotation for them now is counteracted twice and they are rotated the other way.

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This makes sense, and seems to work. To avoid hard-coding the values, I just created a new Rectangle using the height and width (reversed) of the previous rectangle, minus the rotation. –  Dale K Aug 28 '13 at 19:17
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Adobe Reader released an update (11.0.1) in mid-September 2013, which fixed this flaw. I still like mkl's fix to avoid rotations (why add complexity?), but for anyone viewing this, you shouldn't need to worry about it with the latest version of Adobe Reader for iOS.

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