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This is going to be blatantly obvious to someone, but it is somehow eluding me. I am working with a gradle script and there is a portion similar to the following:

javascript.source {
     dev {
           buildSrc 'some/path'
           include '*.js'
           exclude '*.min.js'
     }
}

Now with this, I can modify it to something like:

javascript.source {
     dev {
           buildSrc 'some/path'
           buildSrc 'some/other/path'
           include '*.js'
           exclude '*.min.js'
     }
}

After which I call javascript.source.dev.files (this is a SourceSet underneath) and I get all the files in both directories.

Now what I would like to be able to do, is something like:

def srcs = ['some/path', 'some/other/path']

javascript.source {
    dev {
         buildSrc srcs
         include '*.js'
         exclude '*.min.js'
    }
}

However, that breaks horribly (An error message about converting from ArrayList to string being deprecated).

At any rate, my question is, what is the repeating of 'buildSrc' doing? What is the equivalent syntax to work with a list?

Thanks in advance!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not completely sure if I got your question right, but... Have you tried something like this?

def srcs = ['some/path', 'some/other/path']

javascript.source {
    dev {
        srcs.each { buildSrc it }            
        include '*.js'
        exclude '*.min.js'
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! That works great! So what do you call buildSrc in this case? It doesn't seem quite like a property to me, because otherwise it would be a list underneath and I could just set the list value. –  Myles Aug 26 '13 at 21:39
    
I can't be sure, as I don't know which specific Gradle plugin you use, but it seems to be a method (might be implemented as a dynamic method via missingMethod()/invokeMethod()). But it doesn't really matter. If it works with a string, you can invoke it in an iteration feeding a list of strings one by one. –  zagyi Aug 26 '13 at 21:50

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