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I see in C++ there are multiple ways to allocate and free data and I understand that when you call malloc you should call free and when you use the new operator you should pair with delete and it is a mistake to mix the two (e.g. Calling free() on something that was created with the new operator), but I'm not clear on when I should use malloc/ free and when I should use new/ delete in my real world programs.

If you're a C++ expert, please let me know any rules of thumb or conventions you follow in this regard.

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I'd just like to add a reminder that you cannot mix the two styles - that is, you cannot use new to create an object and then call free() on it, nor attempt to delete a block allocated by malloc(). Probably obvious to say it, but nonetheless... –  nsayer Oct 8 '08 at 19:53
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Good answers, all I have to add (that I haven't seen) is that new/delete calls the constructor/destructor for you, malloc/free does not. Just a difference worth mentioning. –  Bill K Oct 8 '08 at 20:07
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check edit history -- craziness going on with this question stackoverflow.com/revisions/184537/list –  Jeff Atwood Oct 8 '08 at 20:18
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Is it worth resetting the offensive count at this point? –  Mark Biek Oct 8 '08 at 20:21
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Wait, so was he editing his own question to include the offensive stuff? Maybe a new badge for multiple personality disorder? –  swilliams Oct 8 '08 at 21:23

14 Answers 14

Unless you are forced to use C, you should never use malloc. Always use new. If you need a big chunk of data just do something like:

char *pBuffer = new char[1024];

Be careful though this is not correct:

//This is incorrect - may delete only one element, may corrupt the heap, or worse...
delete pBuffer;

Instead you should do this when deleting an array of data:

//This deletes all items in the array
delete[] pBuffer;

The new keyword is the C++ way of doing it, and it will ensure that your type will have their constructor called. The new keyword is also more type safe whereas malloc is not typesafe at all.

The only way I could think that would be beneficial to use malloc would be if you needed to change the size of your buffer of data. The new keyword does not have an analogous way like realloc. The realloc function might be able to extend the size of a chunk of memory for you more efficiently.

It is worth mentioning that you cannot mix new/free and malloc/delete.

Note, some answers in this question are invalid.

int* p_scalar = new int(5);//Does not create 5 elements, but initializes to 5
int* p_array = new int[5];//Creates 5 elements
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With regard to calling delete foo when you should call delete []foo, some compilers will fix this automagically for you and not leak and other will only delete the first entry and leak. I had a few of these in some code and valgrind will find them for you. –  KPexEA Oct 8 '08 at 19:57
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If you do not use the correct delete the result is undefined. It's incorrect. The fact that it might get part of the thing right or work sometimes is just blind luck. –  Michael Burr Oct 8 '08 at 23:31
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@KPexEA: Even if some compilers might fix your mistakes, it's still wrong to make them in the first place :) Always use delete[] where appropriate. –  korona Oct 9 '08 at 8:33
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"Unless you are forced to use C, you should never use malloc. Always use new." Why? What is the win here? For objects we need construction, but for memory blocks, you clearly document two ways to make coding mistakes (the more easily caught () vs [] in new and the less easily caught mismatched array vs scaler new and delete). What is the motivation for using new/delete for blocks of raw memory? –  Ben Supnik Feb 11 '10 at 20:35
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Downvote for "Never use X!" without explaining why. –  immibis Feb 20 at 22:44

The short answer is: don't use malloc for C++ without a really good reason for doing so. malloc has a number of deficiencies when used with C++, which new was defined to overcome.

Deficiencies fixed by new for C++ code

  1. malloc is not typesafe in any meaningful way. In C++ you are required to cast the return from void*. This potentially introduces a lot of problems:

    #include <stdlib.h>
    
    struct foo {
      double d[5];
    }; 
    
    int main() {
      foo *f1 = malloc(1); // error, no cast
      foo *f2 = static_cast<foo*>(malloc(sizeof(foo)));
      foo *f3 = static_cast<foo*>(malloc(1)); // No error, bad
    }
    
  2. It's worse than that though. If the type in question is POD (plain old data) then you can semi-sensibly use malloc to allocate memory for it, as f2 does in the first example.

    It's not so obvious though if a type is POD. The fact that it's possible for a given type to change from POD to non-POD with no resulting compiler error and potentially very hard to debug problems is a significant factor. For example if someone (possibly another programmer, during maintenance, much later on were to make a change that caused foo to no longer be POD then no obvious error would appear at compile time as you'd hope, e.g.:

    struct foo {
      double d[5];
      virtual ~foo() { }
    };
    

    would make the malloc of f2 also become bad, without any obvious diagnostics. The example here is trivial, but it's possible to accidentally introduce non-PODness much further away (e.g. in a base class, by adding a non-POD member). If you have C++11/boost you can use is_pod to check that this assumption is correct and produce an error if it's not:

    #include <type_traits>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    
    foo *safe_foo_malloc() {
      static_assert(std::is_pod<foo>::value, "foo must be POD");
      return static_cast<foo*>(malloc(sizeof(foo)));
    }
    

    Although boost is unable to determine if a type is POD without C++11 or some other compiler extensions.

  3. malloc returns NULL if allocation fails. new will throw std::bad_alloc. The behaviour of later using a NULL pointer is undefined. An exception has clean semantics when it is thrown and it is thrown from the source of the error. Wrapping malloc with an appropriate test at every call seems tedious and error prone. (You only have to forget once to undo all that good work). An exception can be allowed to propagate to a level where a caller is able to sensibly process it, where as NULL is much harder to pass back meaningfully. We could extend our safe_foo_malloc function to throw an exception or exit the program or call some handler:

    #include <type_traits>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    
    void my_malloc_failed_handler();
    
    foo *safe_foo_malloc() {
      static_assert(std::is_pod<foo>::value, "foo must be POD");
      foo *mem = static_cast<foo*>(malloc(sizeof(foo)));
      if (!mem) {
         my_malloc_failed_handler();
         // or throw ...
      }
      return mem;
    }
    
  4. Fundamentally malloc is a C feature and new is a C++ feature. As a result malloc does not play nicely with constructors, it only looks at allocating a chunk of bytes. We could extend our safe_foo_malloc further to use placement new:

    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <new>
    
    void my_malloc_failed_handler();
    
    foo *safe_foo_malloc() {
      void *mem = malloc(sizeof(foo));
      if (!mem) {
         my_malloc_failed_handler();
         // or throw ...
      }
      return new (mem)foo();
    }
    
  5. Our safe_foo_malloc function isn't very generic - ideally we'd want something that can handle any type, not just foo. We can achieve this with templates and variadic templates for non-default constructors:

    #include <functional>
    #include <new>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    
    void my_malloc_failed_handler();
    
    template <typename T>
    struct alloc {
      template <typename ...Args>
      static T *safe_malloc(Args&&... args) {
        void *mem = malloc(sizeof(T));
        if (!mem) {
           my_malloc_failed_handler();
           // or throw ...
        }
        return new (mem)T(std::forward(args)...);
      }
    };
    

    Now though in fixing all the issues we identified so far we've practically reinvented the default new operator. If you're going to use malloc and placement new then you might as well just use new to begin with!

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It's too bad C++ made struct and class mean basically the same thing; I wonder if there would have been any problems with having struct be reserved for PODs and possibly having all class types be presumed to be non-PODs. Any types defined by code which predated the invention of C++ would necessarily be PODs, so I wouldn't think backward compatibility would be an issue there. Are there advantages to having non-PODs types declared as struct rather than class? –  supercat Feb 18 '13 at 16:15

From the C++ FQA Lite:

[16.4] Why should I use new instead of trustworthy old malloc()?

FAQ: new/delete call the constructor/destructor; new is type safe, malloc is not; new can be overridden by a class.

FQA: The virtues of new mentioned by the FAQ are not virtues, because constructors, destructors, and operator overloading are garbage (see what happens when you have no garbage collection?), and the type safety issue is really tiny here (normally you have to cast the void* returned by malloc to the right pointer type to assign it to a typed pointer variable, which may be annoying, but far from "unsafe").

Oh, and using trustworthy old malloc makes it possible to use the equally trustworthy & old realloc. Too bad we don't have a shiny new operator renew or something.

Still, new is not bad enough to justify a deviation from the common style used throughout a language, even when the language is C++. In particular, classes with non-trivial constructors will misbehave in fatal ways if you simply malloc the objects. So why not use new throughout the code? People rarely overload operator new, so it probably won't get in your way too much. And if they do overload new, you can always ask them to stop.

Sorry, I just couldn't resist. :)

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That is a riot! Thanks. –  dmckee Feb 10 '09 at 14:02

Always use new in C++. If you need a block of untyped memory, you can use operator new directly:

void *p = operator new(size);
   ...
operator delete(p);
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interesting, i always just allocated an array of unsigned char when i need a raw data buffer like this. –  Greg Rogers Oct 8 '08 at 19:57
    
Careful the semmantics should be like this: p_var = new type(initializer); Not size. –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 8 '08 at 20:04
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Not if you call operator new directly, then it takes the number of bytes to allocate as a parameter. –  Ferruccio Oct 8 '08 at 20:05
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Hrm not sure, I've never heard of this syntax. –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 8 '08 at 20:06
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The opposite of operator new is operator delete. It is not a well defined action to call delete on an expression with type void*. –  Charles Bailey Oct 8 '08 at 20:16

Use malloc and free only for allocating memory that is going to be managed by c-centric libraries and APIs. Use new and delete (and the [] variants) for everything that you control.

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Also notice that well written C library will hide malloc and free internally, this is how the C programmer should work. –  Dacav Aug 13 '10 at 18:26
    
@dmckee do you have an example of C++ using c-centric libraries by malloc and free? –  milesma Jul 31 '13 at 0:44

There is one big difference between malloc and new. malloc allocates memory. This is fine for C, because in C, a lump of memory is an object.

In C++, if you're not dealing with POD types (which are similar to C types) you must call a constructor on a memory location to actually have an object there. Non-POD types are very common in C++, as many C++ features make an object automatically non-POD.

new allocates memory and creates an object on that memory location. For non-POD types this means calling a constructor.

If you do something like this:

non_pod_type* p = (non_pod_type*) malloc(sizeof *p);

The pointer you obtain cannot be dereferenced because it does not point to an object. You'd need to call a constructor on it before you can use it (and this is done using placement new).

If, on the other hand, you do:

non_pod_type* p = new non_pod_type();

You get a pointer that is always valid, because new created an object.

Even for POD types, there's a significant difference between the two:

pod_type* p = (pod_type*) malloc(sizeof *p);
std::cout << p->foo;

This piece of code would print an unspecified value, because the POD objects created by malloc are not initialised.

With new, you could specify a constructor to call, and thus get a well defined value.

pod_type* p = new pod_type();
std::cout << p->foo; // prints 0

If you really want it, you can use use new to obtain uninitialised POD objects. See this other answer for more information on that.

Another difference is the behaviour upon failure. When it fails to allocate memory, malloc returns a null pointer, while new throws an exception.

The former requires you to test every pointer returned before using it, while the later will always produce valid pointers.

For these reasons, in C++ code you should use new, and not malloc. But even then, you should not use new "in the open", because it acquires resources you need to release later on. When you use new you should pass its result immediately into a resource managing class:

std::unique_ptr<T> p = std::unique_ptr<T>(new T()); // this won't leak
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There are a few things which new does that malloc doesn’t:

  1. new constructs the object by calling the constructor of that object
  2. new doesn’t require typecasting of allocated memory.
  3. It doesn’t require an amount of memory to be allocated, rather it requires a number of objects to be constructed.

So, if you use malloc, then you need to do above things explicitly, which is not always practical. Additionally, new can be overloaded but malloc can’t be.

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If you have C code you want to port over to C++, you might leave any malloc() calls in it. For any new C++ code, I'd recommend using new instead.

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If you work with data that doesn't need construction/destruction and requires reallocations (e.g., a large array of ints), then I believe malloc/free is a good choice as it gives you realloc, which is way faster than new-memcpy-delete (it is on my Linux box, but I guess this may be platform dependent). If you work with C++ objects that are not POD and require construction/destruction, then you must use the new and delete operators.

Anyway, I don't see why you shouldn't use both (provided that you free your malloced memory and delete objects allocated with new) if can take advantage of the speed boost (sometimes a significant one, if you're reallocing large arrays of POD) that realloc can give you.

Unless you need it though, you should stick to new/delete in C++.

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if you are using c++ then try to use new/delete instead of malloc/calloc as they are operator its self compared to malloc/calloc for them you used to include another header for that.so don't mix two different languages in single coding.their work is similar in every manner both allocates the memory dynamically from heap segment in hash table.

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The new and delete operators can operate on classes and structures, wheres malloc and free only work with blocks of memory that need to be cast.

Using new/delete will help to improve your code as you will not need to cast allocated memory to the required data structure.

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From a lower perspective, new will initialize all the memory before giving the memory whereas malloc will keep the original content of the memory.

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new does not in general initialize memory, although there are ways to make that happen: see stackoverflow.com/questions/2204176/… for one discussion about it. –  wjl Sep 30 '11 at 14:54

malloc() is used to dynamically assign memory in C while the same work is done by new() in c++. So you cannot mix coding conventions of 2 languages. It would be good if you asked for difference between calloc and malloc()

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You can (but almost always shouldn't) use malloc in C++. –  interjay Jul 26 '12 at 13:06
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You also missed the prime point that you should aim to avoid dynamic memory allocation, unless doing so through smart pointers. You are just setting your self up for pain other wise –  thecoshman Oct 11 '12 at 10:55

In the following scenario, we can't use new since it calls constructor.

class  B  {
private:
    B *ptr;
    int x;
public:
    B(int n)  {
        cout<<"B: ctr"<<endl;
        //ptr = new B;  //keep calling ctr, result is segmentation fault
        ptr = (B *)malloc(sizeof(B));
        x = n;
        ptr->x = n + 10;
    }
    ~B()  {
        //delete ptr;
        free(ptr);
        cout<<"B: dtr"<<endl;
    }
};
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