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main .cpp

#include        "stdafx.h"
#include        "random_generator.h"


        int
main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
        cout.setf(ios::fixed);
        base_generator_type base_generator;
        int max = pow(10, 2);
        distribution_type dist(1, max);

        boost::variate_generator<base_generator_type&,
distribution_type > uni(base_generator, dist);
        for ( int i=0; i<10; i++ ) {
                //cout << random_number(2) << endl;
                cout << uni() << endl;
        }

        return EXIT_SUCCESS;

}                               /* ----------  end of function main  ---------- */

random_gemerator.h

#include        "stdafx.h"

#include        <boost/random.hpp>
#include        <boost/generator_iterator.hpp>

typedef boost::mt19937 base_generator_type;
typedef boost::lagged_fibonacci19937 fibo_generator_type;
typedef boost::uniform_int<> distribution_type;
typedef boost::variate_generator<fibo_generator_type&,
distribution_type> gen_type;

        int
random_number ( int bits )
{
        fibo_generator_type fibo_generator;
        int max = pow(10, bits);
        distribution_type dist(1, max);

        gen_type uni(fibo_generator, dist);
        return uni();

}               /* -----  end of function random_number  ----- */

stdafx.h

 #include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

every time I run it, it all generate the same number sequence

like 77, 33,5, 22 , ...

how to use boost:random correctly?


that is it. but maybe have a little problem, like the following:

it seems sound

get_seed(); for (;;) {cout << generate_random() << endl; } // is ok 

it genereate the same random number

int get_random() {get_seed();return generate_random();} for (;;) {cout << get_random() <<endl;}  // output the same random number yet
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4 Answers 4

if you want the sequence of random numbers to change every time you run your program, you need to change the random seed by initializing it with the current time for instance

you will find an example there, excerpt:

/*
 * Change seed to something else.
 *
 * Caveat: std::time(0) is not a very good truly-random seed.  When
 * called in rapid succession, it could return the same values, and
 * thus the same random number sequences could ensue.  If not the same
 * values are returned, the values differ only slightly in the
 * lowest bits.  A linear congruential generator with a small factor
 * wrapped in a uniform_smallint (see experiment) will produce the same
 * values for the first few iterations.   This is because uniform_smallint
 * takes only the highest bits of the generator, and the generator itself
 * needs a few iterations to spread the initial entropy from the lowest bits
 * to the whole state.
 */
generator.seed(static_cast<unsigned int>(std::time(0)));
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that is it. but maybe have a little problem, like the following: it seems sound get_seed(); for (;;) {cout << generate_random() << endl; } // is ok it genereate the same random number int get_random() {get_seed();return generate_random();} for (;;) {cout << get_random() <<endl;} // output the same random number yet –  mono Dec 9 '09 at 8:16
6  
I prefer initializing the PRNG to std::time(NULL) + getpid(). This makes sure that binaries executed one after the other, in rapid succession, have their PRNGs initialized differently. –  user1202136 Apr 3 '12 at 7:21
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You need to seed your random number generator so it doesn't start from the same place each time.

Depending on what you are doing with the numbers, you may need to put some thought into how you choose your seed value. If you need high quality randomness (if you are generating cryptographic keys and want them fairly secure), you will need a good seed value. If this were Posix, I would suggest /dev/random - but you look to be using Windows so I'm not sure what a good seed source would be.

But if you don't mind a predictable seed (for games, simulations, etc.), a quick and dirty seed is the current timestamp returned by time().

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Ya right. If the seed is the same, the generator will start with the same random number everytime –  A9S6 Dec 4 '09 at 7:50
    
that is it. but maybe have a little problem, like the following: it seems sound get_seed(); for (;;) {cout << generate_random() << endl; } // is ok it genereate the same random number int get_random() {get_seed();return generate_random();} for (;;) {cout << get_random() <<endl;} // output the same random number yet –  mono Dec 9 '09 at 8:15
    
generate a seed every time the function is called. vs. use the same seed every time which is the same seed? why I get the same random number sequence in the former way –  mono Dec 9 '09 at 14:34
    
See my comment on Chris for abstraction for high quality random source on Windows. –  Chinasaur Sep 22 '11 at 22:18
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If you are running on a 'nix system, you could always try something like this;

int getSeed()
{
    ifstream rand("/dev/urandom");
    char tmp[sizeof(int)];
    rand.read(tmp,sizeof(int));
    rand.close();
    int* number = reinterpret_cast<int*>(tmp);
    return (*number);
}

I'm guessing seeding the random number generator this way is faster than simply reading the /dev/urandom (or /dev/random) for all your random number needs.

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This is the right idea. Note that in newer versions of Boost at least, this is all abstracted for you by random_device. As a bonus, random_device should also be implemented on Windows. Unfortunately, if I understand correctly, it's not implemented on BSD, because the BSD /dev/urandom isn't really non-deterministic. So if you want Linux and Windows interoperability I guess you can use random_device and if you want Linux and BSD interoperability you can use the explicit read from /dev/urandom. If you want some other combination of interoperability I think you're on your own! –  Chinasaur Sep 22 '11 at 22:16
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You can use the boost::random::random_device class either as-is, or to seed your other generator.

You can get a one-off random number out of it with a simple:

boost::random::random_device()()

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It looks as though it returns a result of type unsigned int (I was wondering... so had to look it up). –  Craig McQueen Oct 16 '13 at 0:18
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