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I want to write a method that creates a bunch of almost-duplicate records, just with one or two parameters changed. I'll make a form to control those parameters, I'm just wondering about how best to write the method, and where do keep it.

Presently in my document.rb I've written this:

def self.publish(brand, components, template)
  brand.users.each do |user|
    Document.create(:component_ids => components, :message => 'Message.', :template_id => template.id, :user_id => user.id)
  end
end

It doesn't feel right though. Is there a better way to do this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code is fine if your security model allows all these fields to be bulk assignable by mention in attr_accessible in the model. If it doesn't then you're better off using the block form of create. Also, if Document, Template and User are ActiveRecord instances, you should let Rails manage the details of ids.

def self.publish(brand, components, template)
  brand.users.each do |user|
    Document.create do |doc|
      doc.component_ids = components, 
      doc.message 'Message.', 
      doc.template = template, 
      doc.user = user
    end
  end
end

One final note is that component_ids must be serialized to store a list. This is probably a flaw in your model design. The better way is (probably) to specify Component belongs_to User and also User has_many Components. I.e. Component contains a foreign key to User. If it's necessary for a Component to belong also to many users, then you'll need either has_and_belongs_to_many or has_many ... through. The Rails guide on relations describes all this in more detail.

With the right relations set up, the code will become:

def self.publish(brand, components, template)
  brand.users.each do |user|
    Document.create do |doc|
      doc.components = components,  # Components is now a list of active records.
      doc.message 'Message.', 
      doc.template = template, 
      doc.user = user
    end
  end
end

The resulting SQL will get all the foreign keys and (if necessary) relation tables filled in correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion. As far as accessing form parameters goes, it seems like I should call that method from a controller action while saving the params from the form too. Does that sound right to you? –  CD-RUM Aug 27 '13 at 1:39
    
@emm Certainly having the function in a model and calling it from a controller makes sense. I'm not sure what you mean by "saving the params from the form". –  Gene Aug 27 '13 at 1:47
    
Your updated answer makes a lot of sense. By "params from the form" I meant that I want that method to combine some params[:document] from a form while use the publish(brand, components, template) options set in the controller. –  CD-RUM Aug 27 '13 at 1:53
    
@emm Okay. Good. The basic rule is to never give attr_accessible on any field that must be protected from setting by a form field in any part of the system whatsoever. Note in Rails 4 this problem is fixed by moving the accessibility permissions to controllers and the params class itself. –  Gene Aug 27 '13 at 2:01

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